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ART STUDENTS CREATE STEAMROLLER PRINTS

Though the wind may have been a minor nuisance, it was a beautiful, sunny day to create art outdoors on Thursday, October 12. For the first time ever, in a parking lot on the campus of Augustana, a dozen art students and 2 faculty collaborated with Myrl & Roy’s Paving in Sioux Falls to create large-scale prints using a steamroller.

Working in teams, students spent months prior preparing their 4-by-8-foot fiberboards, utilizing everything from traditional hand-carving tools to electric routers in order to create a relief. The surfaces were inked, covered with material, paper, carpet, a board, then pressed by the steamroller to create the print. The pressure of the steamroller was crucial for image transfer.

Part of the challenge was to find fabric large enough to print on.  While many students used bedsheets, some were able to find fabric large enough. One group used a piece of satin that printed very well. Another group decided to quilt together pieces of fabric so that the colors coordinated with parts of the image in order to create a color-blocked, screen printed feel. It turned out fantastic!

Photo courtesy of Senior Art Student Katie Munson

Students found that designs with more detail, though beautiful, tended to be more difficult to image than those with less intricate carvings.

Approximately 50 large-scale prints were created in five hours. Some of them are currently hanging in the atrium of the humanities building at Augie through the end of the semester. Be sure to check them out!

Photo courtesy of Senior Art Student Katie Munson

Faculty:

  • Chad Nelson
  • Lindsay Twa

Augustana Students:

  • Colter Benson
  • Breanna Burklund
  • Taisya  Gowlovech
  • Hannah  Grapevine
  • Nora Strom
  • Lotte Solvang
  • Ajla Sundstrom
  • Ella Ng
  • Wyatt Dickson
  • Katlin Munson

Iowa State Students:

  • Caleb Henkelman
  • Jordan Luckow

Volunteer Spotlight: Sara Bainter

The Volunteer Spotlight is a new series here on the JAM blog and I am a new blogger, so it’s a perfect match. You may be asking yourself what is the Volunteer Spotlight? Well, let me tell you. Each month we will pick one of the wonderful volunteers here at JAM and ask them many different questions about volunteering, their lives and any projects they’re excited about and want to share with us.

Ideally, I want to sit down face-to-face with my interviewee over a hot cup of tea, unfortunately for my first interview that wasn’t exactly how it went. Our busy schedules kept us apart, but email brought us together.  Say hello to the wonderful artist and poet, Sara Bainter, whom I have the pleasure of volunteering with at JAM.

Here it goes…

Shanda: How long have you been a volunteer at JAM? And why did you get involved?

Sara: I officially started volunteering January 2017? I started getting involved because I knew it would be a great place to volunteer and give back to a community that I felt like had already given so much to me artistically and otherwise since I moved here in March 2016.

What is the best part for you about volunteering at JAM?

The best part is getting to see all of the people who are shocked at the low price of their craft or art supplies, and are going home to create! I also love watching people’s reactions as they leave Exposure Gallery. It’s just a great feeling to experience it first hand.

What do you do at JAM?

I goof off or doodle a huge percentage of the time, and sometimes I put donations out like I’m supposed to. I like to help with Weird Art Wednesdays when I can. I love watching people of all ages come in and use art supplies for free for two hours while we work on creating projects together!

What would you tell someone who is thinking about volunteering at JAM?

You will be so appreciated and needed! Please help. (laughs out loud)

What is your art background?

I feel like that’s a very long story that maybe I should write. But it starts with me being very bored, isolated and lonely in Winner, South Dakota.

What project are you currently working on that you are really excited about?

Right now I’m in the middle of moving and turning my bedroom into an art installation to facilitate more dreaming and imagining.

You have a book coming out soon, tell us a little about that.

Campfire Poetry is the paraphrased journey of heartbreak, devastation and hope, which I illustrated with various mixed media. There is a guest illustration by Christopher Reistroffer! My intention is to give creative control of the lyrics to many different bands and see what comes out of those ideas and performances!

You have beautiful illustration in your book. What came first to you, the paintings or the words?

Thank you! The words definitely came first. It seems like suddenly poetry bled from every pore and I didn’t know when it would stop.

What emotions will be triggered while reading your book?

I’m hoping some people will feel empathy. Maybe others will feel like they are not the only ones with these experiences. I want hope to be a big part of the Campfire Poetry experience.

What was the most challenging part of writing this book? And what was the most rewarding part?

The challenging part of writing is in experiencing conflict worthy of inspiring others. I don’t think I have to talk specifically about what I went through, but I do have to talk about falling down and getting back up in the unique way that I did. I felt like I had no other choice than to write this book, and once it started coming together, I felt a deep responsibility to share it with others in hopes that it will help them.

How does it feel to finally have it done and in your hands?

I really only have had access to the only copy of the proof, and even though I had to change and fix a lot of things, it woke me up and I felt an even deeper responsibility to get the book into the hands of the right people.

Where and when can we buy your book?

The first copies of campfire poetry get here on November 6th. It will be available on Amazon.com. Just search Campfire Poetry or Sara Bainter… or stop me in the street and demand a copy because I will have some on me when they come out!

 

If you would like to volunteer at JAM our next hour-long training session will be Monday October 30th from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m. Must be 18 years old to volunteer alone, but under 18 can volunteer with a parent! You can find more info here.

An Evening of Art, Architecture and Community

with keynote by Dale Lamphere
AIA South Dakota
Thursday, September 14, 2017 from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM (CDT)
Sioux Falls, SD
TICKETS HERE

Renowned sculptor and South Dakota artist laureate Dale Lamphere will give a free, public presentation as part of a celebration of art, architecture and community on Thursday, Sept. 14 in Sioux Falls.

An Evening of Art, Architecture and Community is sponsored by Architecture Incorporated and presented by the American Institute of Architects (AIA) South Dakota and the Great Plains chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA). The event begins at 7 p.m. at the Best Western Plus Ramkota Hotel on 3200 W. Maple St., with tickets available to the public at no charge.

AIA South Dakota will also recognize SDSU alumnus and business leader Jerry Lohr of J. Lohr Vineyards and Wines for his unparalleled support of the SDSU Department of Architecture.

Lamphere sculpted the breathtaking Dignity Statue that perches atop a bluff overlooking the Missouri River in Chamberlain and has been further immortalized in specialty state license plates. Lamphere has also been commissioned to build the Arc of Dreams, a massive stainless steel sculpture that will span the Big Sioux River in downtown Sioux Falls.

Lamphere will give a solo keynote presentation and take questions from the audience. An Evening of Art, Architecture and Community will also feature a brief panel on how art and architecture intermingle to shape community that will include:

Panelist: Dan Pitera, FAIA, executive director of the Detroit Collaborative Design Center and recipient of the coveted Whitney Young Award.
Panelist: Tanya Olson, ASLA, PLA, principal/owner at Tallgrass Landscape Architecture in Custer.
Panelist: Tim Barry, artist and managing partner of Hot Shops Art Center in Omaha.
Panelist: Kristine Bjerke, AIA, principal architect of Architecture Incorporated in Rapid City
Panelist: Dale Lamphere, South Dakota artist laureate, sculptor, owner of Lamphere Studio near Sturgis and founding board member of Arts South Dakota.
Moderator: Patri Acevedo, AIA, CPHC, vice president/present-elect of AIA South Dakota and market leader with JLG Architects in Rapid City.

FIRST FRIDAY REVIEW: SEPTEMBER

Despite the rain earlier in the day, September’s First Friday was a popular place to be. This month, I visited the events at the Washington Pavilion, Rehfeld’s Gallery, Third Eye Gallery at Vishnu, Exposure Gallery, and the Block Party at 8th and Railroad. Talking to the artists at most of the galleries and learning about their work was a treat! The events were all family friendly and worth a trip downtown to see.

~Rachel

“Cracked Open” the Pavilion

Emily Stokes poses next to one of her pieces.

Introduced by Sarah Odens, the Assistant Curator of the VAC, and Jason Folkerts, the Director of the VAC, Emily Stokes appeared to talk about her new exhibition “Cracked Open.” Stokes was very open about her work and life, while telling the crowd her approach to art and her process. Though the gathering only included 18 people, Stokes embraced the intimate atmosphere and opened the floor to questions. She answered inquiries about printmaking, her storytelling, the process she uses and the inspiration for most of her art.

Stokes’ work in the Contemporary Gallery is a compilation of her box and printmaking work that encompasses her style well. The larger pieces on the wall have a simplicity and brightness to them that immediately attracts the eye. The work featured in the gallery is inspired by the differences between small towns and the contrast of living in different places. She explained that this exhibition is somewhat of a new venture for her, and the box concept in some of the pieces came from a desire to change things up a bit.

“I always think of Monet and his haystacks,” Stokes says. “The boxes became a way to kind of unify ideas.”

This exhibition was the first time for Stokes to see her bright work against a dark wall, an experience she excitedly shared with the audience. “It’s taken me awhile to get comfortable with color,” she said.

Her current project is one similar to the boxes, but branches out into more organically shaped creations. She has also been working with screen printing, though her favorite style is still drawing with a ballpoint pen.

As part of First Friday, the Pavilion had a scavenger hunt for children that included pieces in Stokes’ exhibition. Families came in and out of the gallery throughout the talk, producing a lively atmosphere. The unusually shaped pieces and familiar images are a great opportunity to expose kids to art they will understand.

Every side of Stokes’ art has something to it, and the three-dimensional features keep visitors on their toes throughout the exhibit. With the warm colors and farm life images, Stokes has produced a relatable and inspiring exhibition. Director Jason Folkerts said it best: “[She] does a good job of inheriting the Midwest.”

Also at the Pavilion is the “Above the Fold” exhibit with featured origami from nine artists. This exhibit is amazing and has some larger than life pieces that will delight children and adults alike!

Karen Kinder at Rehfeld’s Gallery

Karen Kinder poses next to her favorite animal: sheep.

Walking into Rehfeld’s I was greeted immediately by the new owner, Matt Jorgenson. He was exceptionally polite and helpful in my search for Karen Kinder, the artist of the reception at the gallery that night. The gallery itself was very open and the floor plan well-suited to the foot traffic of a busy First Friday reception. With over 30 artists’ work on display, I was worried I would not be able to identify Kinder’s work. Boy was I wrong! The gallery had set her pieces centrally, and my eyes were drawn immediately to her work.

While walking through the gallery, there was a noticeably different feel from the modern vibe of the Contemporary Gallery at the Pavilion. Rehfeld’s had a warmer and more at-home feel to it. There were children about from the moment I walked in, but much more subdued than the ones at the scavenger hunt. Kinder’s work added to this calmer vibe,  featuring farm and field landscapes with sheep and cattle.

Kinder had many friends and acquaintances visiting with her throughout my time at the gallery. When I finally got a chance to talk to her, the explanations of her work were as warm as the paintings themselves. “Color is just fun!” She said.

Kinder loves color, especially purple, and contrast is extremely important in her work. She also explained that sheep are her favorite animal to paint, though she appreciates the “angularity” of cows as well.

Kinder’s work is well worth a trip to Rehfeld’s, and a great fit for the family or date night. The warmth and farm-grown feel of her oil paintings are inviting and capture the essence of farm life in South Dakota.

Shiny, Happy People at Vishnu Bunny/Third Eye Gallery

Anna Glenski, Morgan Bentley, Hannah Wendt, Dustin Marie, Tyler Breske, Trista White Dove, and The Art of Lemmons were featured in Third Eye Gallery’s latest show. Unfortunately, I did not stay long enough to hear the music from Bodega Sushi and Granola featured that night. The artists put together an amazing array of art in different mediums. The work on display included everything from sculpture to charcoal drawings on newsprint.

The artwork in this gallery presented a different side to modern art that the previous exhibitions influenced by farm life could not achieve. The neons and saturated colors of pop culture icons filled the walls of the galleries, and mixed media pieces with global influence found their place there as well. Though the exhibition was listed as a family event, there were a few pieces present that included nudity or more adult themes that some families might want to avoid.

While many artists presented more abstract concepts, common themes throughout the exhibition were human forms, or parts of them, and pop culture references like Pokémon and the Joker. Along with the many brightly colored pieces, there were quite a few black and white or monochromatic pieces, as well. Some artists had a theme while others simply displayed a selection of their varying works. The variety of work displayed was a refreshing change of pace from the previous galleries I visited, though each gallery had its own charms.

Bonus Feature! Our own Hannah Wendt was featured at this exhibition. She also had work at my next stop–the 5th Annual Tallgrass Recovery Art Show.

Tallgrass 5th Annual Recovery Art Show

The last gallery stop on my First Friday tour was the busiest yet. Held at Exposure Gallery, the Tallgrass Recovery Art Show features the artwork of people who have been affected by addiction. On Facebook the gallery said, “Art is a medium for healing and we’re happy that we can help bring attention to the work that Tallgrass does each year in a small way.”

This show featured paintings, sculptures, and a few found-art style pieces. Most notable in the two room show were the larger-than-life sculpture of a man made of branches, and the fabric draped painted sign. A voting box sat next to the entryway of the gallery, and several visitors stopped to voice their opinion during my time at the show.

Many of the paintings featured words, quotes or the artist’s own thoughts on addiction. Another common motif throughout the show contrasted bright color with black and white or shades of gray. Subjects for the paintings and sculpture ranged from abstract to depictions of people. Though touching is not allowed, many pieces in the show make you want to reach out and feel their different textures and layers. This sort of tactile yearning was a unique experience among the gallery shows that night.

Some of the art in this show may be disturbing to younger audiences, but overall I would consider it family friendly. The pieces came from artists of different age ranges, and the perspectives were as varied as the artists themselves. The pieces in the show draw the audiences in, and simultaneously push them away. This show truly encompasses the different sides of addiction and recovery for an audience who may not have experience with the situation.

I ended the night at the 8th and Railroad Block Party. I didn’t stay long, but it was busy and the music was interesting! The band I heard was a blues group that included a didgeridoo and harmonica in their songs. First Friday was a hit, and there are lots of great new art shows to go see this month. I highly recommend all of the places I stopped at!

First Friday Review: April 3, 2015

Forget favorite colors or holidays. This printmaker has a favorite day of the month. I’m sure by now you may have guessed, that day is First Friday. A day when the creative souls of our humble midwestern city gather en masse to celebrate one another’s work. And I must say, April showered us with a darn fun Friday.

I began my art seeking adventures at Prairie Berry Winery, where I stumbled upon a themed group exhibition called “The Art of the Colloquialism.” The titles of the works sure didn’t “beat around the bush” in alluding to the communicative theme of the works, with headlines like “Six Ways Till Sunday” by Collette Gesinger and a stunning “Take Five” in oil by Steve Randall.

I then meandered onward to check out the newly missing wall between JAM Art & Supplies and Exposure Gallery & Studios. That’s right folks! These two wonderful supporters of local artists now share one, big Continue reading First Friday Review: April 3, 2015

MICHELLE ST. VRAIN – AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW

MichelleStVrainCoverAs children, it is not unusual to find fascination with animals. These creatures are a source to relate to, innocent beings living through the dichotomy of coexistence with man. To me, it makes sense to be drawn to the innocence and wonder of just… being. Children hold this magical quality to them, this ability to approach life with unbridled awe. Life has hopefully not begun to teach it’s hard lessons, to discern one’s path. In the end, we are all drinking the same water, breathing the same air. One should not be so quick to discern the hierarchy of existence.

I wish I had known Michelle St. Vrain as a child. I imagine her exploring through the dense trees of Kentucky, followed by a small body of animals; bunnies hopping at her feet, butterflies flitting above her hair in a blurry crown. This is a delightful image to hold in my mind, but I am quick to point out that Michelle is not some dainty maiden traipsing in the woods with Bambi. She is a strong-willed and mindful soul, and uses her personal beliefs as a point of exploration in her work. Michelle fosters a deep compassion for all living creatures, and continuously develops that connection. Using images of animals, or at least parts of them, she creates moments of interaction with these creatures in their various forms. Instead of focusing on the variance of our existence with the animal kingdom, she finds a refreshing unity in the disparity, and I find that to be just lovely. ~Amy

Continue reading MICHELLE ST. VRAIN – AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW

Jammin’: Initial Gut Reactions

blog-post_initial-gut-reaction

Hello! This is my first post for JAM (be gentle). Jammin’ will be re-occurring theme of my personal insights and opinions about my behind-the-scenes experiences with JAM. – Katie Farritor

When Jess messaged me in March, asking if we could meet up at a coffee shop and chat about the possibility of me joining the non-profit board for JAM Art and Supplies, I had little insight as to what this meeting might actually churn into life.

It was a meeting that fed my creative starvation. A meeting that Continue reading Jammin’: Initial Gut Reactions

Shaine Schroeder and the Art of Instagratification

Shaine Schroeder knows how to work. Since I moved back to Sioux Falls after college, and even more so in entering the area’s art scene, his name is one that I have noticed has often come to attention. His art is visible in galleries, restaurants, the walls in countless friends’ houses, and even a school. Schroeder has made a reputation for himself, and it is one of perseverance and versatility.

shaine-1

This past weekend, he did something particularly interesting. Using Continue reading Shaine Schroeder and the Art of Instagratification

Ear to the Ground – 7/18/14

Artful Noise : Dave Hickey – Romancing the Looky Loos

An essay on spectators and participants

[Photo: Nick Zinner, courtesy of the Anastasia Gallery]

I LUV Dave Hickey, one of the most interesting art critics out there. He quit writing art criticism in 2012 which is a great loss to us all. This essay is from the book Air Guitar, which Continue reading Ear to the Ground – 7/18/14