Tag Archives: Steve Bormes

RUG AND RELIC

With some foot-tapping folk music playing, I had the chance to go into Rug & Relic to interview Steve and Tove Bormes. The time spent speaking with the Bormes was incredibly informing and entertaining! Right away when you walk through the doors, they make you feel welcome. It’s almost as if I was chatting with some long time friends that I hadn’t spoken to or seen for years, but still have such a fun connection with them. Even in conversation, they play off of each other’s strengths and make each other better. You can see they take humble pride in their work with Turkish art, and the local and regional artists displayed in the building. It’s clear that they are personable people that love to take the time to chat with anyone about what they love: art. I encourage anyone to stop by to take a longer look into the fantastic pieces presented here, or even just to ask some questions.     -Hannah

Continue reading RUG AND RELIC

FIRST FRIDAY REVIEW: OCTOBER

I greatly admire those who love fall. I try really hard to get into the spirit of the season. There are certainly things I can appreciate: the yummy coffee drinks and hot cocoa, the pretty colors of the leaves, and after a difficult few months, a welcomed sense of change. But in all honesty, the shortening days and dropping temperatures get to me. And on a chilly, dark October First Friday, I didn’t venture outside of the Washington Pavilion. Even so, the Pavilion was bursting with life, and lots of new and intriguing exhibits to be explored!

Shearing the Shepherd by Walter Portz

This exhibit was really hard for me to write about. Why? Because it was so intense, deeply intimate, and above all, raw. Part of me even questioned if I should be writing about it at all. Of course, one could argue that all art is deeply intimate. Art is self-expression in the truest sense, so what makes this exhibit any different? Shearing the Shepherd is a vulnerable and truthful portrayal of a man’s grief for the loss of his father. The artist uses audio-visual media to bring his experiences of grief to life in a way that is crude and authentic. Standing and viewing this exhibit, I felt like I was crashing a private wake. As someone who lost a parent at a young age, and recently lost a close grandparent, this art felt deeply familiar to me. This exhibit will be different for everyone who views it because everyone has had different experiences with grief. For me, I was deeply uncomfortable. I felt it in my bones, and I cried. And above all, it was a healing experience for me, to see something that I could relate to so genuinely. No matter how grief has or hasn’t touched your life, I think everyone can get something from visiting this deep, and important exhibit.

Deep Sea Imaginarium by Steve Bormes

Stepping into the Deep Sea Imaginarium by Steve Bormes is like entering a cross between an alien universe, and a child’s fantasy world. Bormes spent two years sculpting 101 alienesque fish from old objects and lights. Light plays an integral part in this exhibit. Multicolored lights set the scene in this underwater world, and the fish themselves glow from within: reds, greens, blues and purples. Of his work, Bormes says, “I combine light with objects born of mid-century engineering to create pieces that celebrate the inventions of the past, and transcend a static presentation of antiques and found objects.” He goes on to add, “Every decision I make as an artist is dictated by light.” Bormes is not simply an artist, though, but a story-teller. For each fish he sculpted, he also created humorously fitting common and scientific names for the “species,” as well as whimsical poems that reveal something about what each species is like. Deep Sea Imaginarium is where art meets the fantastical, the whimsical, the downright weird. It’s marvelous.

Unity, A Balancing Act by Terry Mulkey

Terry Mulkey creates art that is both easy to look at, and rich in meaning. He works layer by layer using abstract forms and simple, limited color to achieve a sense of balance. “Drawing upon impulses both unconscious and calculated,” he says in his artist statement, “I move and alter lines and fields of color, acting and reacting to forms until the composition expresses a state of harmony.” The shapes and colors balance each other out, giving them a feel that is peaceful and almost zen. Even the way that the compositions are arranged in the gallery seems to have been chosen so as to balance the colors and tones on each wall. His works are all very bold in their plainness, yet delicate in their simplicity. They seem almost paradoxical by nature, a true testament to the harmony that Mulkey was able to achieve.

Along with a full slate of new exhibits at the Pavilion, downtown was buzzing with the annual Art and Wine Walk, as well as Sioux Falls Design Week projects.

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Steve Bormes
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Visual Artist Lacey Lee
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Urban Archeology
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Urban Archeology
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Jordan Thornton at CH Patisserie
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Vishnu Bunny
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Mark Romanowski at Vishnu Bunny
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Kelsey Benson at Coffea

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Hanley

 

 

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LAURA JEWELL – AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW

LAURA-JEWELL-FEATUREDWhat does home mean? Is it where you were raised? Where you are now? Even if you’ve never left, there is that special gut feeling that just tells you… you are here. You are home. The sanctity of that word blankets many attachments to the notion. That creaky second stair on your family’s porch, the soft nape of your mother’s neck, the warm smell of the wood burning tool you were given as a child. Anything can be home, if it is home to you. Laura Jewell recognizes the importance of knowing your home, and understanding your roots.

 Laura is the kind of person that makes you want to close your eyes and smile. She has a captivating, almost magical quality to her that is effortlessly translated into her artwork. Her most recent series, Rural Superstitions and Astrology, focuses on different lessons she has taken from Old Farmer’s Almanacs. In approaching these lessons, Jewell has had the opportunity to reconnect to her roots as a country girl from rural Kansas, and find re-purpose in the activities of her youth. I feel privileged to have had the opportunity to hear her words, and am happy to share them with you. Please read on, and reflect on the lessons that you’ve learned, and the home that you hold dear.  -Amy

What is the path that has led you to where you are today?

I’ve been interested in art since I can remember. I grew up in the country, in Kansas, and my first art set was a wood burning tool, which I thought was the coolest. I did 4H and did the arts and crafts, did that in high school. Then when I went to college I tried some different things, like Agriculture Business. I just wasn’t into the math part of things, so I started taking art classes and went from there. I moved up here and finished school at USD,  and just kept going I guess.

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Were you attending school in Kansas before USD? What was your major?

Yes, I have a BFA in printmaking.

Did you have mentors, or anyone that helped you through the schooling process?

I had a lot of really fantastic professors. I took a couple of classes from Continue reading LAURA JEWELL – AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW

Around and About – Studio 301

Studio 301 at the Washington Pavilion Visual Arts Center

10AM – 5PM Live Art Making

10:15AM Story time with Hector Curriel in the Children’s Studio

6PM – 9PM Art Reception and Celebration

8PM Live Music with Thomas Hentges of Burlap Wolf King

Studio 301 started off as an idea in 2010 by Justin Schleep and TJ Donovan. Originally called “Take the Day,” this event is a one-of-a-kind experience in Sioux Falls. At this yearly art making event, artists set up studio spaces and create while being watched and interacting with the public. Many artists have stayed committed to the growth and change through the years of the event. It has become a networking event for visitors and artists alike, making it truly an art & community extravaganza.

The Visual Arts Center worked with and listened to local artists while planning this year’s event.  Two artists were contacted to be liaisons for the Visual Arts Center: Jeff Ballard and Michelle St. Vrain. Their job was to Continue reading Around and About – Studio 301

First Friday Review – October 3rd

The sweaters, tall boots, and scarves came out this past Friday. Trekking around Sioux Falls in the blustery, cold weather was a sharp reminder of what is in store for the upcoming months. Luckily, I had the wonderful Jana Anderson accompany me as we wove our way through the streets of downtown Sioux Falls. We hit as many places as we could for the First Friday event of October, absorbing art and happily participating in the Art and Wine walk.

Did I mention that I love First Fridays? How great is it that the community chooses to promote art and the downtown small business world every month? Attend more than one of these and you’ll be sure to see some of the same smiling faces, people who eagerly support this re-occuring event. Without these people, this wonderful evening wouldn’t be happening.

Take a peek below to read about the venues, the artists and the experience of spending a few minutes at as many places as we could.

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The first stop of the night was at Exposure on North Philips. The big Art Show sign points you Continue reading First Friday Review – October 3rd

STEVE BORMES: AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW

STEVE-B-FEATUREDSteve Bormes is cool. Or, in nomenclature more appropriate to that of Bormes, you could say that he is groovy… and pretty damn good at it too. Bormes is one half of the husband-wife team that own the beautifully curated Rug and Relic, located at 8th and Railroad Center. But do not be deceived–there is more to the man behind the rugs, and he has a heck of a story on how he got there.
Walking around Rug and Relic, a person would have to be somewhat of a dolt to not notice the intriguing sculptures speckled about the store, providing patrons with the occasional doll arm or antique car part. Large wooden bowls made into lights, antique kitchen appliances adorned aside the muted fists of discarded dolls, endless subtleties to the human anatomy… these are just some of what makes Bormes’ work so inspiring. He creates with the practicality of science and symmetry, and finds a way to seamlessly marry that with nostalgic remnants of his childhood, keeping his work alluringly curious. He was a delight to visit with, and Sioux Falls is lucky to have such a not-so-secret gem. Stay groovy, Steve. ~Amy
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What is the path that has led you to where you are today?

Man, I’ve been one of those guys my whole life, that when I needed something, I would Continue reading STEVE BORMES: AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW