Tag Archives: Steve Bormes

Photo Tour: Ka-Chunk

On Friday, November 10, we had the opportunity to attend a local, one-of-a-kind vending machine art show at Ipso Gallery called “Ka-Chunk.” Both the prizes, as well as the machines were created by an assemblage of 30+ local artists. The engineer of Steve Bormes‘ dispenser even made the effort to create a wheelchair-friendly push button, a refreshing consideration! So impressed.

Tokens sold out not quite an hour into the evening. Prepared for the demand, the gallery had a collection of Fresh Produce limited edition swag to keep the vending going. It was a packed house from start to finish, and plenty for people of all ages. Here’s a little photo tour of the creative machines and prizes artists came up with for the night! 

FIRST FRIDAY REVIEW: NOVEMBER

This month I stopped by shows at Eastbank, Rug & Relic, and the Washington Pavilion. No new shows at the Pavilion this month, but all of the great activities for kids still happened. There were so many artists talking about their work at Eastbank, I spent most of my time there. The variety of work made fewer stops on my route doable, but I highly recommend stopping by some other locations as well. The Museum of Visual Materials and Rehfeld’s were two stops I had on my list. See more art shows on the Sioux Falls Arts Council webpage.            -Rachel

RUG & RELIC

This First Friday, Rug & Relic hosted a one-night-only feature show of over 150 pieces from Chris Vance. Vance’s work plays on familiar cartoon-like styles and bright colors to bring his work to life. Pieces like “Peanut Butter” take a more abstract turn, but use the same colors and curvy lines as his other styles. Other work on display at Rug & Relic included light sculptures from Steve Bormes, and paintings from other area artists.

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The first artist talk of the evening came from John Kolb. His art style is influenced heavily by his Christian roots. Kolb joked that the goal of one of the pieces on display was to see how many different ways he could do a cross. His pieces focus on shapes in a more abstract approach. He feels that sometimes he gets “locked into” greens and blues occasionally. Using a layering technique with his colors, Kolb’s pieces can get up to 5 coats of paint. He has around 5 pieces on display at Eastbank .

Linda Ackland-Kolb gave the second talk of the night, presenting and describing her pastel-painted beeswax works of art. Her pieces, though small, take a lot of work to get right. She fielded questions about the framing process as well, which is delicate since she does not use sealant to set her pieces. The work on display at Eastbank is a series of vessels and some fashion inspired pieces. Linda plans to branch into more clothing inspired pieces next.

Warren Arends ventured from on-canvas art into stonework and jewelery. His work started as a hobby, but now Arends has two students in soldering. He turns colorful stones from all different countries and continents into pendants and rings. His business, Arends Agates, custom makes every piece for individual requests.

Scott Chleborad was another featured artist at Eastbank. His work combines painting and photography that results in often psychedelic landscapes. Chleborad’s talk was short and to the point, with a few anecdotes about his process. His work with light and contrast makes his work unique and beautiful.

All of the artists’ work at Eastbank is worth a trip to 8th and Railroad to see. More than just these four artists have work on display, and the work they brought is just as exciting. Next First Friday, Eastbank will be doing a “postcard sale” of local art, so be sure to check out the current work on display before then.

 

FIRST FRIDAY REVIEW: AUGUST

For several months, I have wanted to visit the Museum of Visual Materials for their First Friday art receptions. My first impression was joy when I saw their sidewalk covered in fun chalk doodles. The smell of savory wine and cheese definitely peaked my senses. For someone who has never stepped into the building, I thought that the layout of the space helped me feel welcome to walk about and spark up conversation over the artwork by artist Isz.

Once I noticed my time was rapidly escaping me, I decided to move on to my next destination, the 8th and Railroad Center. Boy, was I surprised to find the chance to ride a mechanical bull!

 

After the sweet seduction of the delicious food trucks, I wandered into the Eastbank Gallery. They had some fun, new art displayed throughout the space. I can’t help, but take my time to gaze upon these diverse artist’s work.

On my way to the Washington Pavilion, I spotted one of the most artistic paintwork on a vehicle I have ever witnessed. I’d be telling myself lies if I said I wasn’t impressed. To be honest, I’m quite jealous and was considering doing the same to my own car.

Photographs by Hannah Wendt

As usual, the artists being held at the Pavilion always are enjoyably engaging and ever breathtaking!

A large crowd gathered in the Schultz Gallery for the opening reception of local artist, Anna Youngers.

 

 

 

Right outside Lucky’s stands Steve Bormes‘ sculpture, “School Spirit,” which is part of the Sculpture Walk. I try to take the long way around downtown just to see all of these wonderful sculptures as much as possible, even when driving to work.

Something that caught my eye inside Rehfeld‘s was a poster for the upcoming IPSO Gallery reception with Marc Wagner and Amy Jarding on August 11. I couldn’t resist taking a quick photo of the advertisement art. See you there!

There have only been a hand full of times that I’ve seen inside the Rehfeld’s Gallery. For me, each time seems to get richer as I explore the layout of artists.

 

Just a hop, skip, and jump away from Rehfeld’s is Vishnu Bunny and their Third Eye Gallery. Each month they host different artists, along with a different theme. All I can say is, you’ll want to go check them out!

With the night slipping away, I found myself getting my nightly caffeine crave. What a better situation having the downtown Coffea right next door to Vishnu… Yay, that means more art!

I am someone who is incredibly receptive of my surroundings. That amazing doughnut photograph by Amy really influenced me to go stop by Half Baked Cupcakes for some sweets. To my delight, I was able to see if Sara Bainter had put up any new pieces in their space!

Don’t forget, right outside The Phillips Diner and Woodgrain is usually some outstanding live music! I couldn’t believe my eyes when I saw crowds of folks gathering around the Dakota Snow truck giving away FREE shaved ice courtesy of National Bank. Cool! (Ha, get it?)

Even though I haven’t always been aware of all that First Friday has to offer, Downtown Sioux Falls continues to grow on me with each venture I take. Plus, I was able to look up into our bright, blue sky and watch some hot air balloons drift around town. Until next time fellows.

Photographs by Hannah Wendt

 

 

FIRST FRIDAY REVIEW: JUNE

Every Friday I have the fortunate schedule of getting off work by 5:00, which for a workaholic like myself, that extra time always poses a problem: what am I to do for the next several hours? Never fear, my friends! Downtown Sioux Falls presented, yet another wonderful evening filled with that spectacular, creative scene.

First up was the 8th and Railroad Center for a “funtastic” time at a block party!

 

This being my first stop, I arrived as the beginning acts were playing. When I noticed the presence of several food trucks, I wanted to kick myself for eating dinner before coming…darn!

Well, nonetheless, the show must go on even without trying the amazing foods. Right as I had walked into Eastbank Art Gallery, my spirits were lifted to see such a variety of work being displayed! From jewelry, to watercolor paintings and a painted female figure! Boy, and don’t forget the wonderful sculptures, and vibrant paintings of what our beloved, classy Sioux Falls looked in previous times.

As much as I wanted to stay the entire night for the later bands to play, I had to leave the block party to head up Phillips Avenue. To my surprise, there was a band playing right outside Woodgrain! My second destination was Half Baked Cupcakes to check out what new creations artist, Sara Bainter, has allowed us public to behold.

Now, walking south on Phillips, I directed myself to the New New show happening at Vishnu Bunny Tattoo.

Later that night, Angie Hosh (a personal favorite) was scheduled to play, however, I later found that I wouldn’t be able to see them. Luckily, my dear artist friend, Maddee Ophelia, had attended! Yes!

Through my time spent at Vishnu, I saw MANY incredible works. With the walls brimming with art, it was hard for me to pick a few to show closer up. I must say, these pieces by Sasha McDowell and Emilie Nettinga were some of my favorites. So, you’ll just have to make a hop down to check out the rest and decide which speak to you the most!

Happy 2nd birthday, Unglued!

I enjoy roaming the collections of locally made work for sale at Unglued; it always brings a smile to my face. Good thing I was already smiling because there was a sparkling photo booth to take pictures in for their celebration! Not to mention, Scratchpad Tees had their first experience in its new location for First Friday. To them, I declare a warm summery welcome!

On my way to peak into the local authors signing event, I couldn’t resist stopping to appreciate Steve Bormes sculpture “School Spirit,” which is part of the Sculpture Walk.

The night had gone by fast, so I took a few skips east on 10th Street to Last Stop CD Shop, or more specifically, the Post Pilgrim Gallery.

Another personal favorite is J. White’s work. In addition, there was a large quilted rug placed in the center of the space. The details in these pieces continually blow me away. (Seriously, go check ’em out!)

Not only was there gorgeous visual artwork presented at Post Pilgrim, but the White Wall Sessions were jamming out with their featured artists! You’ve got to love having the chance to look at some inspiring art alongside with the head bobbin’ preforming arts. What fun!

First Friday, you were a great one, once again! See you next time.

-Hannah

RUG AND RELIC

With some foot-tapping folk music playing, I had the chance to go into Rug & Relic to interview Steve and Tove Bormes. The time spent speaking with the Bormes was incredibly informing and entertaining! Right away when you walk through the doors, they make you feel welcome. It’s almost as if I was chatting with some long time friends that I hadn’t spoken to or seen for years, but still have such a fun connection with them. Even in conversation, they play off of each other’s strengths and make each other better. You can see they take humble pride in their work with Turkish art, and the local and regional artists displayed in the building. It’s clear that they are personable people that love to take the time to chat with anyone about what they love: art. I encourage anyone to stop by to take a longer look into the fantastic pieces presented here, or even just to ask some questions.     -Hannah

Continue reading RUG AND RELIC

FIRST FRIDAY REVIEW: OCTOBER

I greatly admire those who love fall. I try really hard to get into the spirit of the season. There are certainly things I can appreciate: the yummy coffee drinks and hot cocoa, the pretty colors of the leaves, and after a difficult few months, a welcomed sense of change. But in all honesty, the shortening days and dropping temperatures get to me. And on a chilly, dark October First Friday, I didn’t venture outside of the Washington Pavilion. Even so, the Pavilion was bursting with life, and lots of new and intriguing exhibits to be explored!

Shearing the Shepherd by Walter Portz

This exhibit was really hard for me to write about. Why? Because it was so intense, deeply intimate, and above all, raw. Part of me even questioned if I should be writing about it at all. Of course, one could argue that all art is deeply intimate. Art is self-expression in the truest sense, so what makes this exhibit any different? Shearing the Shepherd is a vulnerable and truthful portrayal of a man’s grief for the loss of his father. The artist uses audio-visual media to bring his experiences of grief to life in a way that is crude and authentic. Standing and viewing this exhibit, I felt like I was crashing a private wake. As someone who lost a parent at a young age, and recently lost a close grandparent, this art felt deeply familiar to me. This exhibit will be different for everyone who views it because everyone has had different experiences with grief. For me, I was deeply uncomfortable. I felt it in my bones, and I cried. And above all, it was a healing experience for me, to see something that I could relate to so genuinely. No matter how grief has or hasn’t touched your life, I think everyone can get something from visiting this deep, and important exhibit.

Deep Sea Imaginarium by Steve Bormes

Stepping into the Deep Sea Imaginarium by Steve Bormes is like entering a cross between an alien universe, and a child’s fantasy world. Bormes spent two years sculpting 101 alienesque fish from old objects and lights. Light plays an integral part in this exhibit. Multicolored lights set the scene in this underwater world, and the fish themselves glow from within: reds, greens, blues and purples. Of his work, Bormes says, “I combine light with objects born of mid-century engineering to create pieces that celebrate the inventions of the past, and transcend a static presentation of antiques and found objects.” He goes on to add, “Every decision I make as an artist is dictated by light.” Bormes is not simply an artist, though, but a story-teller. For each fish he sculpted, he also created humorously fitting common and scientific names for the “species,” as well as whimsical poems that reveal something about what each species is like. Deep Sea Imaginarium is where art meets the fantastical, the whimsical, the downright weird. It’s marvelous.

Unity, A Balancing Act by Terry Mulkey

Terry Mulkey creates art that is both easy to look at, and rich in meaning. He works layer by layer using abstract forms and simple, limited color to achieve a sense of balance. “Drawing upon impulses both unconscious and calculated,” he says in his artist statement, “I move and alter lines and fields of color, acting and reacting to forms until the composition expresses a state of harmony.” The shapes and colors balance each other out, giving them a feel that is peaceful and almost zen. Even the way that the compositions are arranged in the gallery seems to have been chosen so as to balance the colors and tones on each wall. His works are all very bold in their plainness, yet delicate in their simplicity. They seem almost paradoxical by nature, a true testament to the harmony that Mulkey was able to achieve.

Along with a full slate of new exhibits at the Pavilion, downtown was buzzing with the annual Art and Wine Walk, as well as Sioux Falls Design Week projects.

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Steve Bormes
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Visual Artist Lacey Lee
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Urban Archeology
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Jordan Thornton at CH Patisserie
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Vishnu Bunny
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Mark Romanowski at Vishnu Bunny
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Kelsey Benson at Coffea

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Hanley

 

 

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LAURA JEWELL – AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW

LAURA-JEWELL-FEATUREDWhat does home mean? Is it where you were raised? Where you are now? Even if you’ve never left, there is that special gut feeling that just tells you… you are here. You are home. The sanctity of that word blankets many attachments to the notion. That creaky second stair on your family’s porch, the soft nape of your mother’s neck, the warm smell of the wood burning tool you were given as a child. Anything can be home, if it is home to you. Laura Jewell recognizes the importance of knowing your home, and understanding your roots.

 Laura is the kind of person that makes you want to close your eyes and smile. She has a captivating, almost magical quality to her that is effortlessly translated into her artwork. Her most recent series, Rural Superstitions and Astrology, focuses on different lessons she has taken from Old Farmer’s Almanacs. In approaching these lessons, Jewell has had the opportunity to reconnect to her roots as a country girl from rural Kansas, and find re-purpose in the activities of her youth. I feel privileged to have had the opportunity to hear her words, and am happy to share them with you. Please read on, and reflect on the lessons that you’ve learned, and the home that you hold dear.  -Amy

What is the path that has led you to where you are today?

I’ve been interested in art since I can remember. I grew up in the country, in Kansas, and my first art set was a wood burning tool, which I thought was the coolest. I did 4H and did the arts and crafts, did that in high school. Then when I went to college I tried some different things, like Agriculture Business. I just wasn’t into the math part of things, so I started taking art classes and went from there. I moved up here and finished school at USD,  and just kept going I guess.

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Were you attending school in Kansas before USD? What was your major?

Yes, I have a BFA in printmaking.

Did you have mentors, or anyone that helped you through the schooling process?

I had a lot of really fantastic professors. I took a couple of classes from Continue reading LAURA JEWELL – AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW

Around and About – Studio 301

Studio 301 at the Washington Pavilion Visual Arts Center

10AM – 5PM Live Art Making

10:15AM Story time with Hector Curriel in the Children’s Studio

6PM – 9PM Art Reception and Celebration

8PM Live Music with Thomas Hentges of Burlap Wolf King

Studio 301 started off as an idea in 2010 by Justin Schleep and TJ Donovan. Originally called “Take the Day,” this event is a one-of-a-kind experience in Sioux Falls. At this yearly art making event, artists set up studio spaces and create while being watched and interacting with the public. Many artists have stayed committed to the growth and change through the years of the event. It has become a networking event for visitors and artists alike, making it truly an art & community extravaganza.

The Visual Arts Center worked with and listened to local artists while planning this year’s event.  Two artists were contacted to be liaisons for the Visual Arts Center: Jeff Ballard and Michelle St. Vrain. Their job was to Continue reading Around and About – Studio 301

First Friday Review – October 3rd

The sweaters, tall boots, and scarves came out this past Friday. Trekking around Sioux Falls in the blustery, cold weather was a sharp reminder of what is in store for the upcoming months. Luckily, I had the wonderful Jana Anderson accompany me as we wove our way through the streets of downtown Sioux Falls. We hit as many places as we could for the First Friday event of October, absorbing art and happily participating in the Art and Wine walk.

Did I mention that I love First Fridays? How great is it that the community chooses to promote art and the downtown small business world every month? Attend more than one of these and you’ll be sure to see some of the same smiling faces, people who eagerly support this re-occuring event. Without these people, this wonderful evening wouldn’t be happening.

Take a peek below to read about the venues, the artists and the experience of spending a few minutes at as many places as we could.

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The first stop of the night was at Exposure on North Philips. The big Art Show sign points you Continue reading First Friday Review – October 3rd

STEVE BORMES: AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW

STEVE-B-FEATUREDSteve Bormes is cool. Or, in nomenclature more appropriate to that of Bormes, you could say that he is groovy… and pretty damn good at it too. Bormes is one half of the husband-wife team that own the beautifully curated Rug and Relic, located at 8th and Railroad Center. But do not be deceived–there is more to the man behind the rugs, and he has a heck of a story on how he got there.
Walking around Rug and Relic, a person would have to be somewhat of a dolt to not notice the intriguing sculptures speckled about the store, providing patrons with the occasional doll arm or antique car part. Large wooden bowls made into lights, antique kitchen appliances adorned aside the muted fists of discarded dolls, endless subtleties to the human anatomy… these are just some of what makes Bormes’ work so inspiring. He creates with the practicality of science and symmetry, and finds a way to seamlessly marry that with nostalgic remnants of his childhood, keeping his work alluringly curious. He was a delight to visit with, and Sioux Falls is lucky to have such a not-so-secret gem. Stay groovy, Steve. ~Amy
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What is the path that has led you to where you are today?

Man, I’ve been one of those guys my whole life, that when I needed something, I would Continue reading STEVE BORMES: AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW