Tag Archives: Sculpture

June 2015 First Friday Review

Hello, I’m Sharon! I’m filling in here on the JAM blog for the first time to do a Downtown Sioux Falls First Friday review for June 5th. I was able to make it to four different art receptions that evening, but there were many, many more than that going on. The weather was perfect and downtown was absolutely bustling and buzzing with people!
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My first stop was at the Sioux Falls Design Center for Pikachu Night. I mean, PechaKucha Night. PechaKucha isn’t nearly as mysterious as it sounds, though I still can’t pronounce it correctly. It’s a simple presentation format where 20 images are shown, each for 20 seconds, while the speaker talks about the images as they go by.

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I made it just as the second speaker, Allyson Bousema, was starting. It was standing-room only and I could barely get in the door! Allyson was speaking about her new business, Prints & Repeat, a printing company focused on the unique needs of artists.

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An Ear to the Ground #22

[Charlie Immer – Melt]

Advice from the Master: Critic and Sage Hal Foster

A great back and forth between notable contributors and Hal Foster from Interview Magazine.

” If it’s not critical, it’s not criticism; it’s just commentary or opinion. That doesn’t mean criticism has to be negative in the sense of pejorative; in fact, it can be affirmative if its negativity is clarifying—explosions clear the air! I don’t write to be pejorative or positive in any case; that never motivates me. What gets me going is to grasp the new thing—an idea, an affect, some mix of the two—that a work expresses but doesn’t articulate. ”     – Hal Foster

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MARC WAGNER – AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW

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As artists, sometimes it feels like we’re paddling upstream. All of the work we do for one piece, or one show might give us very little return. We could easily turn into existentialists, banging our heads against the walls, and wondering what the next step is. Most of the time the answer is simple: make work every day and then get out there and show your work again and again. Marc Wagner can attest to that. He recommends it.

Marc is an important ingredient to the Sioux Falls art scene soup. Chipper, inspirational, and knowledgeable only begins to describe Marc, but I encourage you to get to know him; seek him out and spend some time around him because when I do, I’m better for it.~Jess

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An Ear to the Ground #17

New Short Fiction: The Alaska of Giants and Gods by Dave Eggers

The New Yorker

The New Yorker has published a new short story by Dave Eggers, who wrote A Heart Breaking Work of Staggering Genius, and more recently A Hologram for the King as well as the founder of Mcsweeny’s an independent publishing company and Believer Magazine.

Most of Dave Eggers endeavors are brilliant and come from a place of Continue reading An Ear to the Ground #17

STEVE BORMES: AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW

STEVE-B-FEATUREDSteve Bormes is cool. Or, in nomenclature more appropriate to that of Bormes, you could say that he is groovy… and pretty damn good at it too. Bormes is one half of the husband-wife team that own the beautifully curated Rug and Relic, located at 8th and Railroad Center. But do not be deceived–there is more to the man behind the rugs, and he has a heck of a story on how he got there.
Walking around Rug and Relic, a person would have to be somewhat of a dolt to not notice the intriguing sculptures speckled about the store, providing patrons with the occasional doll arm or antique car part. Large wooden bowls made into lights, antique kitchen appliances adorned aside the muted fists of discarded dolls, endless subtleties to the human anatomy… these are just some of what makes Bormes’ work so inspiring. He creates with the practicality of science and symmetry, and finds a way to seamlessly marry that with nostalgic remnants of his childhood, keeping his work alluringly curious. He was a delight to visit with, and Sioux Falls is lucky to have such a not-so-secret gem. Stay groovy, Steve. ~Amy
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What is the path that has led you to where you are today?

Man, I’ve been one of those guys my whole life, that when I needed something, I would Continue reading STEVE BORMES: AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW

David Lethcoe: An Inspired Interview

 

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I once had a tae kwon do coach tell me that when you’re out there on the mat, you want your performance to inspire people. Your performance should look effortless, but high energy. It should be fun, so that people think, “I want to do that, I want to start practicing tae kwon do.” David Lethcoe does this with his sculptures; his creations are fun and carry a lot of energy and he makes me want to create. But Dave isn’t performing or just acting inspired. He knows how to stay inspired; you have to keep learning different things. When you keep learning you don’t have to think out every step–your subconscious can work out the problems that your mind creates. You just need to keep it simple.
Some people intuitively know how simple the world can be. That doesn’t mean they’re simple people. With Dave, it’s just the opposite. He has theory, art history, and new art movements all rolling through his head, fighting for his attention, when deep down he knows that just looking at the sky will suffice. It takes courage to admit that your subconscious can solve problems better than your ego can. Dave’s approach to life is romantic. I am a romantic—that’s probably why I became an artist. I like the idea of working in your studio, having your whole day to just clear your mind and cut materials. To me, when Dave tells us about a day in his studio, it is inspiring and encouraging. Keep things simple. Learn so your mind can stay fresh, and every now and then, look up at the sky. ~Jess 

JAM: What is the path that has led you to where you are today?

Dave: I’ve always wanted to be an artist since I was young. I drew all the time and played outside. I didn’t have any artists in the family, but my older brother drew as well. I always thought he was good, and I wanted to be as good as him. After a while, he got to point where he didn’t draw any more and I kept doing it. When you’re in elementary school, art kind of makes you the cool kid because everyone wants to see what you’re doing. I would compete with another kid in the class by trying to outdraw him. We were Continue reading David Lethcoe: An Inspired Interview

Adam Goodge: An Inspiring Interview

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Sometimes there is a thoughtfulness in a person that is immediately apparent through their approach to a conversation, and the things that they share with you. It may serve as a reminder to others of the beauty in subtlety and the strength in purpose. In this interview, we had the opportunity to talk to one of those people. 

Adam Goodge is a printmaker living in Sioux Falls, that focuses primarily on screen printing, and producing clean images with somewhat politically driven messages. He welcomed us to his home to view his studio and a collection of his works. Goodge chatted with us about the importance of detail in producing a good print, how to create a powerful message with a visually pleasing piece, and what happens when you use a plasma cutter to take apart an engine. -Amy

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Steve Larson: An Inspiring Interview

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So often in our youth we forget how indiscernible time has a way of becoming. The moments that we experience in our early adulthood may become mere sentences or moments of hardly recalled time. It is hard to imagine the future, and sometimes even more so the past. To give us some perspective on the transitory nature of both art and life, JAM met with artist Steve Larson at his home in Sioux Falls. He is a former Lutheran minister and social worker that did not begin to create art until he was in his forties. Larson spoke to us about the importance of being open to inspiration, and finding it through fostering a will to keep yourself in constant creative motion. He shared with us his rock collection, past paintings, and his most current 3D constructions. Most importantly, Larson pointed out to us to never consider things to be final, as in our lives, it’s not where you’re at—it’s where you are. -Amy

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