Tag Archives: painting class

KRISTINE REINER: AN INSPIRED INTERVIEW

Our final Inspired Interview finds us with local graphic designer, and mixed media artist, Kristine Reiner. Read up, and be sure to keep her on your radar!

Describe to us what type of work you do, and what your preferred mediums are.

I really prefer to reuse stuff around me. I’ve actually just called it mixed media. I paint with roses, mainly. I went to school for graphic design. I received an abundant amount of roses, and I didn’t know what to do with them, so I started painting with them.

So when did you start?

I had one art class my whole high school career. I was from a really small town. My senior year they cancelled my art class…all art classes. They cancelled them, and cut funding. I didn’t know what to go to school for, so I just chose graphic design. I’ve never really painted or done anything like that. 2012 was really when I started painting and experimenting.

How has your work evolved over time?

In high school, my confidence level wasn’t up, and there were all these other stunning artists who make things picture perfect. I was like, I’m never going to be that good. That’s why I leant towards abstract, just seeing how I progress each series I do. It’s funny cause I’m not trying, but my improvements are there. I can’t really gauge it.

Bikini – 2019

Were there any factors that led you to where you are today?

Absolutely. I didn’t really know why I was so attracted to art. I’ve kind of had a rough childhood. I was looking for a hobby, and I was creative, but I hadn’t really gotten to that point where I knew how to use it. I realized in college that creating art was therapeutic, and I started using my art to bring awareness to sexual and domestic violence around town. I’ve actually donated to a few shows, and volunteered and helped, and all other sorts of stuff. It’s actually really cool. Art is too crazy, and it’s such a easy way to open an awkward conversation.
I do graphic design for a living. Selling paintings is harder, but I had one good show.

What usually inspires you to create your work?

My emotions mainly. If I really stressed out and cranky, that’s the time to create. It’s so weird. It’s hard to describe it. I can just tell if I haven’t painted in a while. I kind of get an itch.

Do you do paint every week or so?
I do so many different things. I make lip balm, I make dog bandanas, and other stuff because of my ADD. But sometimes I get in the spur of it. I think my last series, within the matter of 2 days, I made like 12 paintings. It’s just kind of when you are in the flow, you are in the flow.

How long does it typically take you to complete a project?

Well, the one behind you took like probably two weeks. But I’ve gotten a lot quicker, because I’ve gotten a lot more comfortable with my style. So, I would say a day tops, unless I hate it. Well, that’s not true, I’ve been fighting with one downstairs, that’s been months. It’s all about my mood.

Do you have anything you want to work on in the future? Any skills you would like to develop over time that you have not yet done?

I would love to actually get where I’ve completed one or two works a week. Where I try to challenge myself, that way I don’t get so creatively blocked.

Does it happen often where you are in a funk?

It does, but I’ll do something else, and then I’ll come back to it.

K -2018

How has Sioux Falls influenced your work? What are your thoughts on the art community in Sioux Falls?

Sioux Falls has been absolutely amazing…just sharing my work and meeting other artists. The community is so tight knit – so close and so helpful. I guess a lot of artists have competitors and people like that, and I’ve never even experienced that.

They are just helpful and nice. You can call them up and say like, “Hey, this really fricken sucks.” They can give you some tips, and they just get it.

The Road Ahead – 2018

Have you been here your whole life?

Basically, I grew up in a small town like 30 minutes away.

P -2018

How did you get know about JAM?

Was in a media class at USF here in town. I needed to volunteer at some art thing for my degree, and JAM was just starting. They were in of the little studio rooms at the time. So, I got to watch that whole progression. It’s so crazy.

CHX RMN – 2019

What advice would you give to anyone starting out as an artist?
Don’t give up. Keep trying. Someone in the world somewhere is going to love what you make. It may you take you years to find them, but somebody will.

Wings – 2019
Took 8 white roses to complete, and has a few hidden “Easter eggs,” like the Sasquatch in the bottom right hand corner. Reiner likes to keep her commissions free and personal. The couple she made this for played into their inside joke of the husband being a ‘Sasquatch.’

Where do you showcase your art?

Usually downtown. I’ve been in a few banks and museums. Just kind of event-type of things to raise awareness for nonprofits. As far as current projects go, I’m just working on some commissions, and getting ready for a show coming up later this spring. I don’t have any more information on that however. I do have a piece in the “Finding Our Voices” traveling show. It was just at the Third Eye Gallery. The show aims to bring awareness to sexual and domestic abuse. It’s all survivor-led, and will be at a new location in Sioux Falls soon.

I recently started leading painting classes, as well. The next one is at Full Circle Book Co-op on March 23.

h. 2019

FIND KRISTINE:

Website: kristinereiner.com
Facebook: @Kristinesartwork 
Instagram: @kristinesartwork

FIRST DATE IDEAS FOR ART LOVERS: TRY A PAINTING CLASS

by Lucy Chambers
JAM Contributing Writer

Art is one of the most historic forms of human interaction and a popular pastime among many. In fact, studies from Harvard’s Women’s Health Watch show that creating visual art can reduce the effects of stress, promote relaxation, and even improve emotional resilience. Couples can re-discover the power of creativity through painting canvases and promote discussion. So, no matter how good you are at it, painting can allow you to test your partner’s artistic side and see how well you both interact to new experiences. Here’s why taking a painting class makes the perfect first date for art lovers.

Create A Fun, Stress-Free Zone

Remember those awkward moments where you sat in silence on a previous date? In a world focused on social media, people tend to get distracted by their digital conversations rather than their actual date. With a painting class, you won’t have to worry thinking about what to say next. In fact, there is no time for awkwardness. Between the time you spend on listening to the guide and following instructions, painting your canvas, and sipping wine, there will be plenty of time to discuss your artwork, laugh with each other, and enjoy your time spent together.

Set the Tone for Your Relationship

The first date sets the tone for the rest of the relationship. According to the University of Texas, studies reveal that men and women evaluate potential partners through face-to-face context. Humans focus on how that person behaves and makes them feel in person that cannot be felt in cyberspace. Whether it is a good experience or even a disaster, how we create first impressions are vital to meeting someone new.

Show Off Your Creativity

Taking a painting class allows you to express your creativity and artistic side. It allows you to create something together and show off your skills. Not to mention, you will both achieve a sense of accomplishment when the artwork is actually finished. So, whether you or your partner enjoy art, this thoughtful experience will provide the perfect opportunity to learn something new about them and yourself.

Lastly, nothing makes a great “first” date as much as having fun while you try something new. Whether it is your first time or the hundredth time you’ve painted, taking your date to an art class will become a fresh new experience the both of you can remember and enjoy.

 

Lucy Chambers is a professional freelance writer with many years experience across a variety of sectors. She made the move to freelancing from a stressful corporate job, and loves the work-life balance it offers her.