Tag Archives: Museum of Visual Materials

FIRST FRIDAY REVIEW: AUGUST

For several months, I have wanted to visit the Museum of Visual Materials for their First Friday art receptions. My first impression was joy when I saw their sidewalk covered in fun chalk doodles. The smell of savory wine and cheese definitely peaked my senses. For someone who has never stepped into the building, I thought that the layout of the space helped me feel welcome to walk about and spark up conversation over the artwork by artist Isz.

Once I noticed my time was rapidly escaping me, I decided to move on to my next destination, the 8th and Railroad Center. Boy, was I surprised to find the chance to ride a mechanical bull!

 

After the sweet seduction of the delicious food trucks, I wandered into the Eastbank Gallery. They had some fun, new art displayed throughout the space. I can’t help, but take my time to gaze upon these diverse artist’s work.

On my way to the Washington Pavilion, I spotted one of the most artistic paintwork on a vehicle I have ever witnessed. I’d be telling myself lies if I said I wasn’t impressed. To be honest, I’m quite jealous and was considering doing the same to my own car.

Photographs by Hannah Wendt

As usual, the artists being held at the Pavilion always are enjoyably engaging and ever breathtaking!

A large crowd gathered in the Schultz Gallery for the opening reception of local artist, Anna Youngers.

 

 

 

Right outside Lucky’s stands Steve Bormes‘ sculpture, “School Spirit,” which is part of the Sculpture Walk. I try to take the long way around downtown just to see all of these wonderful sculptures as much as possible, even when driving to work.

Something that caught my eye inside Rehfeld‘s was a poster for the upcoming IPSO Gallery reception with Marc Wagner and Amy Jarding on August 11. I couldn’t resist taking a quick photo of the advertisement art. See you there!

There have only been a hand full of times that I’ve seen inside the Rehfeld’s Gallery. For me, each time seems to get richer as I explore the layout of artists.

 

Just a hop, skip, and jump away from Rehfeld’s is Vishnu Bunny and their Third Eye Gallery. Each month they host different artists, along with a different theme. All I can say is, you’ll want to go check them out!

With the night slipping away, I found myself getting my nightly caffeine crave. What a better situation having the downtown Coffea right next door to Vishnu… Yay, that means more art!

I am someone who is incredibly receptive of my surroundings. That amazing doughnut photograph by Amy really influenced me to go stop by Half Baked Cupcakes for some sweets. To my delight, I was able to see if Sara Bainter had put up any new pieces in their space!

Don’t forget, right outside The Phillips Diner and Woodgrain is usually some outstanding live music! I couldn’t believe my eyes when I saw crowds of folks gathering around the Dakota Snow truck giving away FREE shaved ice courtesy of National Bank. Cool! (Ha, get it?)

Even though I haven’t always been aware of all that First Friday has to offer, Downtown Sioux Falls continues to grow on me with each venture I take. Plus, I was able to look up into our bright, blue sky and watch some hot air balloons drift around town. Until next time fellows.

Photographs by Hannah Wendt

 

 

JERRY FOGG: AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW

“The Return”

Dan: Where are you from, Jerry?

Jerry: Well, I’m practically from here. I’ve been here since the 70’s. Initially, I grew up North, outside of Chamberlain, on Crow Creek reservation there.

And have you lived downtown here or-

Geez. Being the nomad I am, I’ve lived everywhere in this town.

Do you have a recollection of what downtown was like, art scene wise back in the day? Was it existent, nonexistent?

Pretty much nonexistent. I mean, back when I moved here, 41st St. was the end of town. There was nothing on that side of 41st St. I wasn’t really involved that much in the arts when I first moved here. It was mostly trial and survival tactics. Trying to pay bills and everything else, find work, and stay alive. As time went on, I have discovered that it’s come a long way, though, in its own right. Since the 70’s, there is a lot more involvement in art businesses, galleries, constructive people and such than there was back then. A lot of businesses are opening their doors, allowing artwork to come in and be presented.

I feel like if you are an artist and you wanted to go into a business years ago, you were almost kind of looked at like an oddball. It’s kind of like, you want to do what? You wanna put that where?Coffee shops have always been around, but within the last five, ten years with generation X and millennials that are hanging out at coffee shops…that’s how you conduct business, and also sell your business, too.

Exactly. It also gives the proprietor a little bit more of a draw to certain people who want to come and see artwork.

So, tell me, education wise, did you go to school for art, or is it kind of self-taught?

I went to school for art, but basically it still turned out to be self-taught. It always ended up that way. I was always rebellious. I’ve always wanted to do a certain style of art, a certain type of art. My mind was set on that. And when somebody else…an art teacher or somebody…was trying to teach me something else…“Oh, okay, alright.”

Native Soul: Jerry Fogg Tribal Art facebook page, 2017

So tell me, what drives you to create art? What inspires you?

My culture. Native American. I try to prove myself as…long ago I used to sing and dance as Native American to prove myself, and as I got older and moved into a bigger city where it wasn’t really that much of a genre anymore, I had to turn to something to still maintain that I am Native American. Just seemed like the artwork was, not the easiest, but the best way to do it because it brought forth the subject that I was trying to get across. Doing Native American oriented art, people look at it and say, “Wow, this guy’s Native American.” And when they see me, then it’s a whole different story. “You did this?” Blue eyed and light skin, they don’t think you’re Native. “We thought you’d be brown skin, with long brown hair.”

“Clear Blue Prairie” (12 x 16″) 2015

I can maybe hear it a little bit in the voice, though.

You never get rid of that accent.

How often do you create your art?

Not answering your question, I can say as much as possible. I do try to get stuff out there. Right now, the kind of artist I am, I’m working with storytelling. That storytelling from culture and legends and stories of our people…there’s so much of it, and I try to work with that as much as I can. But I also like to hop on the bandwagon of what’s going on right now.

The pipeline.

Exactly, the pipeline. And anything else that goes on. The land grabbing, or accomplishing certain spiritual feelings and ceremonies, and everything else that goes on. Like, Good Earth, Blood Run, that’s kind of going on right now. Hiawatha Indian Insane Asylum; I had to be part of that. That’s one of the big stories. Just things that go on today. I try to push that artwork out there, and get something done to represent that I am knowledgeable of it, and part of it.

“Snake in the River” 2012

Do you find that when you direct attention to events like that, do you feel like it brings more of the public eye to it?

Exactly. It’s me trying to put the word out. Like when they were trying to find funding for Blood Run, and buy the land and stuff, I was putting together pieces of art that people would come to see and talk about that, and I would tell them [about it]. And all of a sudden it came to be, “Get out the checkbook. If you aren’t going to buy my piece, donate to them, the purpose.” And it works! Unbelievably, it works.

So, kind of rolling along with creation stuff, do you have a favorite piece? Like when I take photographs, I think at the time that’s the best work I’ve done, then the next thing I do tends to be a little bit better than that. Do you kind of have a favorite?

Well, as an artist you’re always trying to make that ultimate piece. It’s never there, but you keep trying and trying. Just like a photographer, he’s looking for that ultimate shot. But yeah, I’ve gotten several pieces that I stand back, and I look at, and I hated to let go. But you got to. I wouldn’t be able to actually point my finger and say this one’s my best. In the majority of my personal experience, I’ve got a full amount that I really, really like. Still, at the back of my mind I’m hoping to come out with that one that blows them all away.

You’re always depending on the public, too. This piece I would say, personally, I like this piece so much, and not so many people like it. But this piece over here, I think is really, really blasé, and everybody likes it. So, you would almost have to consider that as your best piece that you’ve done, because it’s the most successful.

“Journey by Blue Moon” (13 x 5″) 2014

It’s an interesting perspective, too, because often what you perceive as your best work (that you put your heart and soul and blood and tears into) is met with very little reception. Then you put something else out, or somebody else comes along, and says that’s the greatest thing ever seen. And it’s kind of like, are we seeing the same thing? Kind of continuing along with favorites there, do you have a favorite art show?

Down the line, I’ve been to very great art shows. The one that I stick with that is dedicated to me, I feel, as much as I am to it is Augustana Artists of the Plains. It’s my go-to place. I’ve won four out of five years Best of Show. That’s just always been a good show for me. It’s gotten a good reputation out in the city. I have a lot of people who just wait to see what I’ve got up next year.

Talk of the town. That’s a good thing, actually.

Yeah, publicity is always a good thing. And followers are great. Just awesome.

I remember I heard a quote years ago that said, “Passion breeds followers.” So, do you have any favorite materials when it comes to creating art that you like to use?

Leather. Leather is my friend. And just old, traditional things that have been with my ancestors, my people, over many centuries. I try not to reproduce them in that direction, but utilize the image of them. I don’t use plastic. I don’t use fake this or imitation that. All my pictures have original things like bones, actual bone beads. Or if I do a tobacco tie, there’s actual tobacco in there, it’s not just a little rock. And I try to be straightforward that everything is real in my artwork. For instance, like this one here, they call the Pipeline the Black Snake. That’s actually a snake in there. That’s not a fake one, that’s an actual snake. It’s just the way that I am, I’m a stickler for that. If it was arrowheads, it wouldn’t be something that was mass-produced in a factory. It would be actual arrowheads that I’ve searched for, or were given by my people to use and things like that. It just seems like it makes the picture more unique in its own way, and original. Like I always say, every picture is one-of-a-kind. I don’t ever reproduce it.

“Buffalo Warrior Society” (7 x 10″) 2015

That’s the thing with art, as well, is that it’s too easy to replicate. Everybody wants a copy of something. Like a poster of the Statue of Liberty or something like that, it’s not the original. I’ve never understood, personally, the need for something that’s replicated over and over.

Well, like a dream catcher. Somebody makes 10,000 dream catchers in a year’s time. And they’re all the same dream catcher. You can go from your house down the block… “Oh, I’ve got one of those in my house! I’ve got one of them, too. The person down the block has one, too.”

I try to stipulate to where when you take this home and hang it on your wall, you aren’t going to go across town or across state and see the same thing hanging on someone else’s wall. It’s just one. That’s kind of what I pride myself in.

Do you have an inspirational quote that kind of gives you a little bit of fire to go out and create art? Or is there a mantra that you, perhaps, live by?

I always tell myself, if I can’t sell it, I’ll give it away. There’s many different people who get me flowing; their artwork, and stuff I’ve lived and learned from. There’s a lot of different people who have talked to me about certain things. But a quote…not really. Not really at all.

Native Soul: Jerry Fogg Tribal Art facebook page, 2017

Maybe, perhaps, a saying that you maybe say yourself or someone has said to you in years past.

I remember I was in a dart tournament a long time ago, and I can reframe this to art as being in a gallery or being in an art show. They interviewed me one time and asked, “Well, what do you think about all this?” And I just said, “Just proud to be here.” Win, lose, draw, whatever. Just proud to be here.

That’s incredible. Kind of going along with that, do you happen to have any advice for people who want to sell their artwork, or haven’t found a way to sell it?

To me, I can look at something that just makes your eyes cross, but it’s still art. No matter what you want to say about it. No matter if you hate it or you like it, or you love it, or you want to burn it, or whatever. It’s still art, because it comes from somebody trying to say something. I just tell people who are doing really great and beautiful art, you’ve got it, it’s there. Go out and flaunt it. And to those who kind of hold back, try to get your confidence up and go out there. You never know until you try.

“Headed for the Clearing” (32 x 18″) 2014

What do you find is, perhaps, the hardest part of being an artist?

The hardest part? I think the most difficult is having too many ideas. Too many ideas at once. Like right now, as you and me are sitting here, I got 60 pieces in my mind. I have materials and everything to finish them, and I’m just…gah, what do I do first? And finding the time to do it.  That’s one thing…you gotta just take a deep breath and settle down, and just start doing them. Slowly, even. A lot of times I get in my mind, I got to get all 60 of these done, and it just bugs me. It’s probably about the biggest brick wall I could run up against; trying to do too much at once. Sometimes some things don’t come out right when you’re trying to do that.

There’s a quote I heard years ago, and it was from the lead singer of Coldplay, Chris Martin. Chris was asked, “So, when you listen to your music do you hear flaws, do you hear things that you could have fixed?” He responds by saying, every time I listen to it there’s things that I hear that I wish that I could have done differently. And he goes, once you hand that album over to be finished, you’re done with it. Because I feel that as an artist, the longer you hold onto something…you go, I’ll tweak this, tweak that, and before you know it a month becomes a year and it’s not put out.

Exactly. You’re delaying yourself. One thing I’ve noticed in the city of Sioux Falls here, it really surprises me that when I go from one show that so many people have commented and seen what I got (and I hadn’t made anything different), and I take it and I place it over in another place in town…you’ve got a whole other mass of people who come in that have never seen it. What I’m trying to say is, to anybody that wants to go out there, never fret that what you have won’t go good over in other places. Everybody just doesn’t come over and see your work in town at one show. It happens everywhere.

So, we talked about the hardest thing about being an artist, but tell me, what’s one thing you love about being an artist?

Sitting back and looking at something you just created. It’s not overwhelming, but it does give a euphoria that you feel. Wow, I got this, I did this. And you put it out there, and people do appreciate it as much as you do. That’s what’s really good about it. It’s what makes you feel happy about it, when you think this is good I’ve made this, I’m happy with it. Then you go out and somebody else sees it, and expresses their feelings to you that they like it, too. It’s really good.

What do you love about Sioux Falls?

Sioux Falls is kind of a diverse town, and it’s getting more and more with every year. Like the arts, there’s a lot of people who like the arts; be it music, be it dance, be it orchestra, be it concerts…sports, that’s another one. So, there is a big draw to many outlets. And I think an artist does have a lot of places to present their art, and people come. Maybe 10 to 15 people…and you think that’s not very many…but you keep it up, and you show your stuff in 30 places and there’s been 15 at each. Add that up, you do the numbers, you got a good crowd going.

Or the word-of-mouth, too. Come check out this exhibit, or this piece.

Oh, yeah. And people respond, too, if you have a card or Facebook. You give it to them and you think, oh well they just took it, to heck with it. Then you see them. They do get on Facebook, and look at your stuff. They respond, which is great.

“Across the Universe” 2015

We talked about what you love about Sioux Falls, is there anything that you would do differently with the art community? Things maybe you would change?

What I would like to see done is…if they could possibly get the grant or the money for it somehow…is to build an enormous art center. And don’t make it way out-of-town; put it somewhere where people can get to it. Once it’s done have people run it to where it is Sioux Falls artists, and just have Sioux Falls artists in it.

For the people, by the people.

Yeah, for the people by the people. If you live five miles outside the city limits, sorry. Sorry, get your own.

And have that. And sell and get a percentage off of it to keep the building running. And put 40 artists in there…40, 50, 60 artists. They don’t have to have their whole collection in there. Three, four pieces a piece. They can switch them out, and everything else. Get the tracks really moving, and then get it really exposed to the public and stuff. I think that it would work for the simple reason that people do love the arts.

I mean, that could also double as a performing center for concerts, plays.

Oh, yeah. If it’s a big enough building. See, what I was trying to get away from is like Pavilion and other places, they have like two or three artists that are there for two, three months. Why not have 80 artists with five pieces a piece in there, and have it go permanently back and forth. Grow, or decrease, multiply.

Like a seasonal thing kind of, too.

Yeah. People can create new work, and bring it in, and have it advertised. A new work is at the Sioux Falls Arts…or what ever you want to call it. Keep it to artists who are active, and are still doing artwork right now as we speak.

Kind of wrapping things up here. Do you have any shows coming up?

I’m kind of booked up at least until August 2017.

 Oh, wow.

That’s kind of the way I feel I have to be, because if people say where’s your gallery…I can’t afford a gallery. I can’t afford a studio. I got to keep my artwork out there. The city of Sioux Falls is my studio. That’s what I figure, anyway, because it’s always out there somewhere.

I like that.

“Across the Universe” 2015

One thing I like to try to do is donate. There certain people who like to call me or contact me and want me to donate. I’m all for it. Behavioral health places, Muscular Dystrophy, Children’s Kidney hospital and stuff. I participate with them. I give as much as I can, because I know if I was in trouble…

Do you have any examples of giving someone something like that that has turned their life around or lifted their spirits?

I haven’t really done much for individual people. But Behavioral Health, when they had their auction out there, it was great. You actually see the people who are, not only out there bidding on your artwork, they are out there talking to doctors, psychiatrists and stuff about betterment. Certain cities need places like that, and they need artists and artwork to be a part of that. Music, whatever you have. It’s been successful as far as I know, because I get my foot in the door. It’s always good to donate a piece of artwork to an association that’s 10,000 employees.

You get good exposure.

You get your name out there.

That’s one of the hard projects that I have not really faced, yet. I would have to say within the four, maybe five state area is as far as I’ve gone. I’ve had tourists come through and say, you need to bring this stuff to the coast, or you got to bring this stuff down south. I had one guy, at a show here in town looking for a long time. He said I’m from Santa Fe, and they don’t have nothing like your stuff down there. “You got a bring your stuff down there, but before you do, add a couple zeroes.” All right, sure, sure.

I made a trip over to New York about two weeks ago to photograph a couple who is going to get married back in South Dakota. And you think…that’s a lot of work. But making that trip…you kind of tell people that I was willing to do this, I’m willing to do it again.

That’s one thing that always scares me half to death is taking out every penny I have, and going to a place like Los Angeles, and not selling a thing. But a lot of people say that’s a chance you have to take.

I mean if you’re kind of self analytical, sometimes doubter, maybe a little OCD kind of like me a little bit…it’s easier said than done.

Oh, yeah, it is. The thing of it is, one of these days I am going to take that chance. I’m going to load up and just head out for a month, and hopefully come back empty.

Talking about artwork, not pockets, right?

[laughter] Yeah. If you plan your trip to where you saved up for it, just call it a vacation. And if you sell anything, that’s just gravy.

“Wall Travelers”

Jerry’s work can be found on Facebook at Native Soul: Jerry Fogg Tribal Art.

ELEMENTS AND OTHER APRIL REVIEWS

ELEMENTS: WORK FROM USD’S SCULPTURE CULTURE
by Emma Johnson

Friday, April 14, I had the pleasure of witnessing something that doesn’t happen too often in the art world – an exhibit comprised entirely of student work. The show, titled Elements: work from USD’s Sculpture Culture, featured artworks from both undergraduate and graduate sculpture students at the University of South Dakota. The exciting display highlighted the array of mediums and techniques that USD sculpture students are utilizing in their art making.       -Emma

Close up of Mikayla Tuttle’s “Cairn,” 2105, wood and steel

Third year sculpture student Courtney LaVallie’s piece immediately caught my attention as it seemed to be floating in the corner of the room. The work, titled “Unraveling Universe and Her Tears,” appeared as nest of wood strips tangled into an impossible egg shape. Upon closer inspection an opening in the front of the “egg” revealed a web of beaded droplets inside. LaVallie said she is most drawn to sculpture because of its versatility – “I can use any material I want, anything I can find can be made into a piece of art.” LaVallie is primarily interested in processes such as wood carving and metal casting.

Liela Ghasempor, “Rage,” 2016, Stoneware clay

In addition to wood working, the exhibit featured pieces of cast iron as well as ceramic works, such as graduate student Amy Fill’s series of porcelain cups titled, “Dynasty”. These ironically elegant forms resemble tin cans covered in soft, rusty orange and blue flowers. “Dynasty” highlights sculpture’s ability to include countless mediums and techniques in order to create a three dimensional piece. Fill works consistently with found-objects, ready-mades, and industrial materials.

Amy Fill, “Dynasty,” Wood and salt-fired, slip cast porcelain, commercial stencils

A particularly charming piece was Beckett Smith’s “Silhouette”. This one-legged stool defied gravity in the center of the gallery, while its shadow (a thin piece of wood painted black and laid out on the floor) revealed all four legs! This work not only made some great art historical references (Duchamp anyone?), but added a sense of humor and whimsy to the exhibit.

Ben Powers, “Container,” 2017, wood

The back gallery at Exposure featured USD student, Leila Ghasempor’s solo show. Ghasempor was the winner of Exposure’s Solo Show award at the annual Stilwell Juried Art Show that occurred this past January. A quick look around the room made it quite evident why Ghasempor received this award. The artist chose to display a series of striking ceramic busts that she created last summer. Each face was carefully twisted and molded into fantastic facial expressions that reveal Ghasempor’s anti-war advocacy. Although her solo show contained only ceramic works, Ghasempor utilizes a number of mediums; one of which is performance. The piece that Ghasempor performed at the opening of her solo show further emphasized the anti-war theme that runs through much of her work.

Leila Ghasempor, “Terrified,” 2016, Stoneware clay

Students such as Cody Robinson (a senior sculptor) feel that Sculpture Culture is a term used to define the sense of community that sculpture students have formed with one another. Robinson has stated that he enjoys being a part of a group that he can share his ideas with.

Dani Backer, “Blanket,” 2016, wood

The Sculpture Culture show brought to light the sensational student work that all too often remains in the studio as opposed to the gallery. While this group of student artists agree upon the importance of Sculpture Culture, LaVallie has pointed out the importance and necessity of student-led exhibits. LaVallie believes these “are important for students because it gives [them] an opportunity to see [their] work outside of the studio.” Student-led shows also allow young artists to make necessary connections with their audience and other artists working in their community.

 

APRIL FIRST FRIDAY REVIEW 
by Hannah Wendt

With the days getting longer and the sunset guiding my footsteps, where do I go on April’s First Friday night? Downtown Sioux Falls!

Taking the hands of my 7-year-old sister and 4-year-old niece, our first destination is one of our top favorite places in Sioux Falls, the Washington Pavilion Visual Arts Center. March’s First Friday event hosted several new exhibits, so April’s was a continuation of most of the same works. However, twice visited is great for the younger, or the younger at heart, as the building continually offers a fun learning environment.

After our adventure cravings were filled by the Pavilion, we decided to walk (more like skip) across the street to the Sioux Falls Design Center. For the last while, popping into the Design Center to see what they are all about was on one of my priority lists. I led my two companions through the door, and, wowza, I’m glad the three of us stopped in during Free First Friday! They were demonstrating how to complete your own screen printing…with Easter designs on cards! We followed a helpful individual to a table set up with colored card stock, and already prepared screen printing boxes. The process of pulling a squeegee across an ink covered screen onto the paper underneath to produce something entirely new fascinated anyone inexperienced with printing. So, for my little sister and niece, it was the equivalent of finding a treasure chest in a never before discovered cave.

Eight-thirty rolled by, and signs of tiring feet, tiring eyes, and tiring minds appeared. Our First Friday trio called it a night. Moreover, it would be a challenge to contain our excitement for the fun that was set to be had the next morning. We looked forward to exploring new ways of doing origami at JAM Art and Supplies with local artist, Reina Okawa, who will be putting the origami pieces together into a full scale installation at the Washington Pavilion. Oh, what great things Sioux Falls is holding for us in the near future!

 

ARTability
by Tana Zwart

The Sioux Falls Mayor’s Disability Awareness Commission hosted their 7th annual ARTability reception at the Museum of Visual Materials on April First Friday. Roughly 60 local artists with disabilities displayed limitless creativity in a wide range of mediums; even needlepoint and macrame. Melodies from local flautist, Vicki Kerkvliet, provided ambience while over 130 guests enjoyed hors d’oeuvres, and perused the large exhibition.

The transforming and therapeutic nature of art seemed to be a prevalent, collective undertone. One artist noted a drastic evolution in her paintings from when she initially started creating. The angry stark blacks and piercing reds she described of her first works compared to the prominently more colorful, abstract pieces she had displayed that night, was a testament to an internal shift that can come from finding an outlet that fits.

The exhibition was a one-night event, as opposed to previous years where the art hung in the museum for a month prior to the reception. Many of the pieces were available for purchase, with all of the funds going directly back to the artist.

It would be wonderful to see more faces of the art community at next year’s event. Keep it on your radar. I promise, you won’t want to miss it!

 

 

FIRST FRIDAY REVIEW: FEBRUARY

Two for Fargo, please.” With tickets safely in my breast pocket, I leave the DTSF office and the Shriver Building to greet the morning’s piercing sky. Smiling, I think about my hopes for tonight: The Museum of Visual Materials for Tara Barney’s interactive art project, the Pavilion for art receptions, and the State Theatre’s showing of Fargo. Fargo. How appropriate; I realize I’m not at all dressed for this cold, so I stuff my hands in my pockets and run the block to the car. Glad I don’t live in Fargo…

Continue reading FIRST FRIDAY REVIEW: FEBRUARY

First Friday Review: February 5th, 2016

A rare moment of warmth in the South Dakota winter meant I really didn’t mind wandering around on this First Friday. And mild weather came with a mild schedule. I had plenty of time to linger at each place because I got an early start and only had a handful of haunts to hit up. So let me share what I found with you. Continue reading First Friday Review: February 5th, 2016

Making Sense Of It All: The Museum Of Visual Materials

As an artist, relationships with galleries, patrons, collectors, and the many other varieties of art enthusiasts become just as important, if not more so, than the created work itself. Creating art and showing it in a gallery space is not, in the least, simply about making money. Exhibiting works of art creates communication with the world outside of the studio. The artist and the gallerist share a certain level of involvement and appreciation with the art. –JAM blogger Jordan Thornton

Downtown Sioux Falls is rich with beautiful, historic architecture. One of the oldest buildings there is home to a non-profit by the name of The Museum of Visual Materials. A few days ago, I had the pleasure of interviewing Anna at the MoVM. Our morning was filled with hot coffee, a tour of the museum, and a conversation that shed light on the vision behind the museum.

The first question I had for Anna was not one that required much research, but ended up providing the majority of the information I was seeking to learn about the museum.

JAM: “Why is it called The Museum of Visual Materials?”

Anna: “The founder of the museum, Dr. Rose Faithe, named the museum after her uncle Dr. Mathew Faithe’s truck. He had labeled it the “Museum of Visual Materials” and drove around town showing the community the items he had collected throughout his many travels. She also wanted a place where the five senses could be explored.”

We then delved into the where and how of discovering the five senses throughout the museum.

museum-of-visual-materials-sioux-falls-artists-jam-art

Sight: The art gallery, the reason I had emailed Anna in the first place. The museum alternates artists every two months. Those interested in displaying their work Continue reading Making Sense Of It All: The Museum Of Visual Materials

Around and About Sioux Falls – “Native Spirit Showing”

Jerry Fogg Show Reception

Museum of Visual Materials

500 N. Main Avenue, Sioux Falls

Friday, September 12, 5:30-7:30

Exhibit runs until October 30

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Looking for something to do this Friday? There is a reception for Jerry Fogg at the Museum of Visual Materials that would definitely be worth your time. He is a regular customer of mine at Mathison’s, and I’ve worked with him for the past few years. Admission is free and there is complimentary Continue reading Around and About Sioux Falls – “Native Spirit Showing”