Tag Archives: mixed media

KRISTINE REINER: AN INSPIRED INTERVIEW

Our final Inspired Interview finds us with local graphic designer, and mixed media artist, Kristine Reiner. Read up, and be sure to keep her on your radar!

Describe to us what type of work you do, and what your preferred mediums are.

I really prefer to reuse stuff around me. I’ve actually just called it mixed media. I paint with roses, mainly. I went to school for graphic design. I received an abundant amount of roses, and I didn’t know what to do with them, so I started painting with them.

So when did you start?

I had one art class my whole high school career. I was from a really small town. My senior year they cancelled my art class…all art classes. They cancelled them, and cut funding. I didn’t know what to go to school for, so I just chose graphic design. I’ve never really painted or done anything like that. 2012 was really when I started painting and experimenting.

How has your work evolved over time?

In high school, my confidence level wasn’t up, and there were all these other stunning artists who make things picture perfect. I was like, I’m never going to be that good. That’s why I leant towards abstract, just seeing how I progress each series I do. It’s funny cause I’m not trying, but my improvements are there. I can’t really gauge it.

Bikini – 2019

Were there any factors that led you to where you are today?

Absolutely. I didn’t really know why I was so attracted to art. I’ve kind of had a rough childhood. I was looking for a hobby, and I was creative, but I hadn’t really gotten to that point where I knew how to use it. I realized in college that creating art was therapeutic, and I started using my art to bring awareness to sexual and domestic violence around town. I’ve actually donated to a few shows, and volunteered and helped, and all other sorts of stuff. It’s actually really cool. Art is too crazy, and it’s such a easy way to open an awkward conversation.
I do graphic design for a living. Selling paintings is harder, but I had one good show.

What usually inspires you to create your work?

My emotions mainly. If I really stressed out and cranky, that’s the time to create. It’s so weird. It’s hard to describe it. I can just tell if I haven’t painted in a while. I kind of get an itch.

Do you do paint every week or so?
I do so many different things. I make lip balm, I make dog bandanas, and other stuff because of my ADD. But sometimes I get in the spur of it. I think my last series, within the matter of 2 days, I made like 12 paintings. It’s just kind of when you are in the flow, you are in the flow.

How long does it typically take you to complete a project?

Well, the one behind you took like probably two weeks. But I’ve gotten a lot quicker, because I’ve gotten a lot more comfortable with my style. So, I would say a day tops, unless I hate it. Well, that’s not true, I’ve been fighting with one downstairs, that’s been months. It’s all about my mood.

Do you have anything you want to work on in the future? Any skills you would like to develop over time that you have not yet done?

I would love to actually get where I’ve completed one or two works a week. Where I try to challenge myself, that way I don’t get so creatively blocked.

Does it happen often where you are in a funk?

It does, but I’ll do something else, and then I’ll come back to it.

K -2018

How has Sioux Falls influenced your work? What are your thoughts on the art community in Sioux Falls?

Sioux Falls has been absolutely amazing…just sharing my work and meeting other artists. The community is so tight knit – so close and so helpful. I guess a lot of artists have competitors and people like that, and I’ve never even experienced that.

They are just helpful and nice. You can call them up and say like, “Hey, this really fricken sucks.” They can give you some tips, and they just get it.

The Road Ahead – 2018

Have you been here your whole life?

Basically, I grew up in a small town like 30 minutes away.

P -2018

How did you get know about JAM?

Was in a media class at USF here in town. I needed to volunteer at some art thing for my degree, and JAM was just starting. They were in of the little studio rooms at the time. So, I got to watch that whole progression. It’s so crazy.

CHX RMN – 2019

What advice would you give to anyone starting out as an artist?
Don’t give up. Keep trying. Someone in the world somewhere is going to love what you make. It may you take you years to find them, but somebody will.

Wings – 2019
Took 8 white roses to complete, and has a few hidden “Easter eggs,” like the Sasquatch in the bottom right hand corner. Reiner likes to keep her commissions free and personal. The couple she made this for played into their inside joke of the husband being a ‘Sasquatch.’

Where do you showcase your art?

Usually downtown. I’ve been in a few banks and museums. Just kind of event-type of things to raise awareness for nonprofits. As far as current projects go, I’m just working on some commissions, and getting ready for a show coming up later this spring. I don’t have any more information on that however. I do have a piece in the “Finding Our Voices” traveling show. It was just at the Third Eye Gallery. The show aims to bring awareness to sexual and domestic abuse. It’s all survivor-led, and will be at a new location in Sioux Falls soon.

I recently started leading painting classes, as well. The next one is at Full Circle Book Co-op on March 23.

h. 2019

FIND KRISTINE:

Website: kristinereiner.com
Facebook: @Kristinesartwork 
Instagram: @kristinesartwork

ADAM BEILKE: AN INSPIRED INTERVIEW

This college student, and Sioux Falls native, has art in his bones. Say “hey,” to Adam Beilke!

Describe to us what type of work you do, and what your preferred mediums are:

So, I’m kind of like mixed-media. I like making a lot of digital stuff, because I’m a Graphic Design student. I like doing that, but I also respect the art of traditional acrylic painting, so I do a lot of that, too. Just, like, all across the board.

Do you go to college then?

I’m a second year at Southeast Tech, and it’s only a 2 year degree.

How long have you been doing your specific medium? How has your work evolved over time?

Digital probably 3 years, and then painting I’ve been doing since high school.

I’m always looking at new artists and new styles, so I’m always getting inspired by different stuff…getting new ideas. I think I have a better understanding of what I want to make as time goes on.

Who are your favorite artists?

Off the top of my head, Keith Herring, the 80s artist. I like his simplicity. I like a lot of famous stuff like Picasso and Andy Warhol.

Some other favorite artists include Keith Haring, Alex Grey, Adam Jones, Craig Gleason, Sidney Howard, Nick Guenzler, Karnn Bhullar, Allie Craig and Merritt Cates.

There’s some cool local art, I just can’t think of any local artists off the top of my head.

Were there any factors that led you to where you are today?

I was just always interested in art in high school. Ever since I got out, I’ve been trying to book art exhibits and stuff. So, I’m always continuing it and practicing it.

Do you display your art anywhere?

In the process of making new pieces for my second art exhibit with my friend, Sam Babcock. He and I have known each other since middle school and he was the first person I reached out to about a collaborative show. He and I rented out gallery space at the Museum of Visual Materials this past spring. That was my first art show. We’re going to have another one in the summer. I plan to also work with some other local artists sometime in the near future.

What usually inspires you to create your work?

Usually other peoples stuff. It depends. I kind of have to be in the mood for it. If I have an idea, I have to act on it, and I never know when it’ll hit me. So, it kind of just varies.

How long does it typically take you to complete a project?

Usually, it can only be a couple hours if I’m just sitting down and working on it. But painting, it can be like hours on end. That stuff takes like a long time.

Do you have anything you want to work on in the future? 

I am currently trying to create and develop a clothing brand called “Viable Psyche.” This brand will serve as a way to tie in my passion for clothes-making, along with my design and art compositions. The name and logo represent growth and functionality between the mind, soul, or spirit, yet I encourage people to find their own meaning within its style. As of now, it doesn’t have an official website, but I do have a temporary artist shop using Threadless. I hope to be able to fund and launch a more independent website in the future as the brand (hopefully) grows. I’m selling shirts at Last Stop CD Shop, and also a record store downtown, as well.

Any skills you would like to develop over time that you have not yet done?

In the art world, maybe watercolor. I’m awful at watercolor, but my dad’s really good at it. I’ve never gotten to master that. I’m always retracing over my mistakes and stuff. I don’t know…I think there’s always a lot of stuff you can do with digital art. People are always creating new things and trying to figure out new technical stuff, and finding new techniques all the time.

So, you said your dad does watercolor painting. Does that inspire you?

Yeah, it’s weird because I’ve been drawing since I can remember. My mom’s also an art teacher at Lincoln High School. It just seemed right.

I find that my purest form of inspiration comes from listening to music. Artists tend to rely on looking at what other people are making, which can be a vital way to keep on top of trends and styles, but using music can be a great tool in coming up with my ideas. My CD and Spotify collection span across many genres, causing different emotions and thoughts to transfer upon listening. There’s nothing better than being able to tune out and start from scratch using only the creative influences of audio.

How has Sioux Falls influenced your work? 

I really like the culture here. I’ve been to a ton of exhibits at the Washington Pavilion. I think downtown has a cool creative scene. I think we all kind of inspire each other a bit.

What are your thoughts on the art community here?

Pretty cool. I like them. Like I said, I can’t name any local artists off the top of my head, but seeing stuff that’s around, it’s cool that we’re adapting to new styles and stuff.

What advice would you give to anyone starting out as an artist?

My advice would be not to try too hard. Being yourself is the most genuine thing you can do when it comes to being an artist. You don’t have to make a canvas. Draw whatever’s on the top of your head. Starting out with just a sketchbook, you can get as many ideas out as possible, then you can kind of pick and choose projects. Just starting out with a sketchpad and being original, drawing to have fun – those are the most important things I can recommend.

STORE: www.viablepsyche.threadless.com

INSTAGRAM: @viablepsyche

FACEBOOK: @viablepsyche

FIRST FRIDAY REVIEW: DECEMBER

This First Friday had some special gallery events at Rehfeld’s, the Washington Pavilion, and Eastbank. Rehfeld’s and Eastbank each hosted a show that focused on smaller size with a variety of artist participants. If you’re looking for a smaller piece of art, this is the time to go get it! The Pavilion had two newer exhibits, plus the “South Dakota Governor’s 7th Biennial Art Exhibition.” These places are all showing a great variety of art this month, and each location has a wide array of different styles, materials, and conceptual art.

Drawn to the Darkroom

Heidi Draley McFall        Visual Arts Center Jerstad Gallery (2nd Floor)

Opened October 21, Drawn to the Darkroom features photorealistic portraits of people in the throes of emotion. Starting with 35mm film, Draley McFall’s images start as photos, but are recreated as portraits with added layers of texture, a kind of homage to the imperfections of darkroom developing. All of the images on display are black and white, but striking.

A line on the artist’s statement for the gallery

The Tiramisu Diaries

Connie Herring                     Visual Arts Center Shultz Gallery (3rd Floor)

Guest artist Connie Herring is back at the Visual Arts Center showcasing a project 20 years in the making. The Tiramisu Diaries, in her words, is a project about friendship, eating together, and companionship. This is her fifth or sixth installation of the project, most of which were on a much larger scale. Connie makes her own paper, does the binding, and dyes the ribbons in coffee. The result is an almost tangible (but please don’t touch!) texture that leaps off the installation and into the minds of passerby. A photo collage of various places Herring and friends have eaten tiramisu accompanies the installation, and brings life to the stories she has to go with the project.

Connie talks to some visitors about her work.

South Dakota Governor’s 7th Biennial Art Exhibition

Various Artists                    Visual Arts Center Everist Gallery (3rd Floor)

The Governor’s Biennial features an array of sculpture and canvas work with an impressive use of colors and subject matter. The whole gallery was filled with these pieces of art, and offered some surprises around the corners.

8×8

Various Artists                     Rehfeld’s Art and Framing (10th and Phillips)

8×8 is exactly what it sounds like, a showcase of art 8 inches by 8 inches wide. Various artists, 8 to be exact, created small-scale paintings and mixed media on canvas to sell for $88. The wall that displayed these pieces already had several stickers marking sold paintings by the time I got there at 6:45. The other art around the room was by the same artists participating in 8×8 and perhaps a few others.

The “8×8” wall
Edges of the 8x8s, some canvas, some wood, some other media
A particularly creative 8×8

Postcard Art

Various Artists                                 Eastbank Art Gallery (8th and Railroad)

Eastbank’s size-driven show featured art approximately the size of a postcard from around 20 artists. Larger art was on display as well, but the postcards were the feature of the night. Artists were milling about and talking to patrons as they browsed through the carts. There was a little something for everyone in this show, ranging from wildlife portraits to caricaturish fantasy.  

ANOTHER SHOW WORTH NOTING:

The Naughty List                          Third Eye Gallery at Vishnu

Art made for giving! 20+ artists, pieces $100 or less. All art is buy and go. Take what you want off the wall and give the gift of local art. The show and opportunity to purchase runs all month. There are paintings, jewerlry, sculpture, photography and more more more.

REINA OKAWA: AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW

 

Marc Wagner

Reina Okawa has an eye about her. There is an attention to detail, and an alertness to fluidity in her work. She credits her methods to inspiration from her Japanese roots, and her childhood in Venezuela. Using a variety of material, she creates bright, playful compositions, abstractions from nature in a mixed media context. Her work pulls a person in, each layer possessing lovely detail, intricacies feeling like tiny little secrets between the viewer and the piece. Reina’s work is thoughtful, a direct reflection of her personality, a warmth emanating from an unassuming soul. It was a pleasure to hear her thoughts, and even more so to share them. Never change, friend. You are a treasure. ~Amy

Continue reading REINA OKAWA: AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW

Around and About Sioux Falls – “Native Spirit Showing”

Jerry Fogg Show Reception

Museum of Visual Materials

500 N. Main Avenue, Sioux Falls

Friday, September 12, 5:30-7:30

Exhibit runs until October 30

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Looking for something to do this Friday? There is a reception for Jerry Fogg at the Museum of Visual Materials that would definitely be worth your time. He is a regular customer of mine at Mathison’s, and I’ve worked with him for the past few years. Admission is free and there is complimentary Continue reading Around and About Sioux Falls – “Native Spirit Showing”