Tag Archives: JAM Art and Supplies

FIRST FRIDAY: AN ARTIST’S PERSPECTIVE BEHIND THE SCENES

September’s First Friday was filled with new experiences and new friendships. I challenged myself this month by doing as many different and exciting things as I could. Having my artwork present in two separate group art shows, while simultaneously displaying quality, was a big part of that challenge. 

My First Friday morning began with appearing on KELOLAND News to chat about the 5th Annual Tallgrass Recovery Art Show at Exposure Gallery, along with artists Betsy Ashworth and Joan Zephier. Personally, this wasn’t a first time being interviewed about my artwork, but it was a first having it air on television. As nerve-wracking as it was to piece together what I’d say to KELO, it was all worth it. Being able to have the chance to speak about a powerfully impacting exhibition is well worth any amount of nerves. I’m so thankful for Joan and everyone involved with the show.

“Here’s something you could do tonight. #Repost @mattholsen
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The 5th Annual Tallgrass Recovery Art Show is tonight from 5-9 at Exposure Gallery. A preview of the amazing pieces coming up on KELOLAND News. #kelonews” -KELOLAND on Instagram.

The most surprising thing was the intense amount of people that showed up just for this healing event. I’m, at times, the type of person that would rather stay home and resist any chance to interact with people. Then there are special times that I’m able to move into a healthier mood that pushes me to meet folks and reach out. The reception was an incredibly eventful first.

A fun, interactive aspect to the exhibit is the People’s Choice Award. Attendees were asked to cast their vote before they left. With the pieces being displayed the entire month of September, I hope you have a chance to stop by to look around.

I enjoy seeing written, story-like pieces beside a visual artwork. It’s even more powerful when the viewer gets a written accompaniment to help lead their thinking, and walk them down a path of interpretation. I like to look for little body cues as viewers take in my work, as well. When someone is reading what I’ve placed before them, and they realize how it fits with everything else they’re seeing, that’s one of my favorite moments. It’s almost like an electric connection is sparked inside their eyes. Witnessing people light up with a specific passion for any artwork is a treat.

At 7:00 p.m. I had to hop, skip, and jump over to Vishnu Bunny Tattoo for the other group show I took part in this month. This show served as an introduction to local artists that the community may not have known about otherwise.

Both Exposure and Third Eye Gallery at Vishnu are constantly brainstorming new topics and themes for artists to submit and present on. Keep your eyes peeled for calls for art. A great resource is our very own Call For Art page on JAM’s website!

I’m not a fan of bland artist statements. I like to give information in a more engaging and fun way. The “theme” of my work displayed at Vishnu is similar to a timeline with missing chunks. So, I decided to make my statement more of a funky story to follow along with. I noticed that during the night, I had to point this fact out to folks. Most of whom I chatted with had never heard of an artist statement that didn’t just state the obvious facts.

For those of you reading who are wondering how to get your work into galleries, just keep going. Connect. Keep pushing. Keep meeting people. Keep working on your art. Keep taking in constructive criticism. Keep positive. What more is there to say?
www.patreon.com/HannahWendt

www.HannahWendt.com

JOHN NELSON: ART EDUCATOR

The sun smiling down upon Sioux Falls, unmuffled by clouds, I leisurely walk into the East Bank Art Gallery. Instantly enchanted by the creative expressions of local artists hung from wall to wall, I am warmly greeted by John Nelson; a man modest in stature but enormous in personality and compassion. I am surprised to find that he is a free-spirited, easy going guy, with a contagious smile that never seems to leave his face. He pulls out two chairs, hand-painted with bright colors and complemented with delightful flowers. Treating me as an old friend, we chat for a while before I get around to interviewing him.  – Patrick

[Photos by Rachel Polan, Sketch Crawl 2017.]

Continue reading JOHN NELSON: ART EDUCATOR

FIRST FRIDAY REVIEW: JULY

The first weekend in July may have set a record downtown. From events, to people traffic, to motorcycles; everywhere you went there was something to enjoy, a crowd of people enjoying it, and virtually nowhere to park. Like most summer weekends, you have to pick and choose what to do, but July First Friday proved to be a roided out rendition of Sophie’s Choice. No matter what you picked, you likely still felt like you were missing out on 10 other things. Some, to be never experienced again, like Art Maze II. It was arguably the busiest  of all time that downtown has ever been. A couple of our bloggers caught merely a sliver.

ART MAZE II
With all of the outstanding events occurring Downtown Sioux Falls on July’s first Friday, I certainly hope everyone was able to hop down and enjoy the festivities! One of such events was the Art Maze II, which happened during the First Friday and Saturday. For those two nights, 30+ local artists, including myself and JAM, come together to create an aMAZEing event full of art installations, performances, murals, henna body designs, interactive spaces, lemonade stands for a cause, food trucks, and more!
As you walked through the spaces, you teleported into a world of extraordinary imagination. The truth is, even photographs couldn’t quite capture the excitement one experienced throughout event. For me, being one of the artists and witnessing the transformation of the entire space, I was filled with a surreal sensation. I still am unable to pin just what that feeling was…a pride in my city and its accomplishments, an excitement for everyone involved, watching and engaging with folks throwing confetti in my interactive installation, seeing such happy expressions on their faces. Maybe it was what the possibilities could be for the future…Art Maze III? Perhaps just an all-encompasing, epic feeling. Rock on Sioux Falls.
Hannah
 
EASTBANK BLOCK PARTY
As the sun bent behind high-rising buildings, guitar chords jumped out of large rectangular speakers and danced along the open air. Erik Koskinen and his band just began there 2-hour-long set. Erik told timeless tales of American life through the eyes of a hard working, Michigan born man. The concoction of Erik’s folk rock, mixed with the community of the crowd in the art and cultural hub of Sioux Falls, made for the perfect end to an exciting and fun-filled First Friday.
-Pat

YOU CAN STILL CHECK OUT THESE OTHER NOTABLE ART SHOWS THROUGH THE MONTH OF JULY

CIGARETTE MONEY @ THIRD EYE GALLERY
Visual artist include:
Solomon Carlson – Sioux Falls SD
Derek Meier – Minneapolis MN
Kimberlynn Jo Floren – Sioux Fall SD
Angela Meyer – Minneapolis MN
Derek Meier
Image via Vishnu Bunny on Facebook
Solomon Carlson
Image via Vishnu Bunny on Facebook


CHAD NELSON AND TRAVIS HINTON @ REHFELD’S
Travis Hinton is a ceramicist. Chad Nelson, a printmaker.

MELANIE RATZLAFF @ SIOUX FALLS ARTS COUNCIL
Melanie Ratzlaff’s artwork includes unconventional materials such as VHS tapes, pop cans, and recycled paper to create artwork that is a contemporary interpretation of her Lakota heritage. In this specific body of work, one will find references to pop culture & female identity. Melanie’s work has made its way to homes in South Dakota, Washington, and Arizona.
Melanie Ratzlaff
Image via Sioux Falls Arts Council website

AN EDUCATOR INTERVIEW: MERCEDES MALTESE

As a fellow employee of the Washington Pavilion, I have had the chance to meet Mercedes before interviewing her for JAM’s Educator Interview. We meet regularly at the Pavilion to go over future lesson plans, and she is there to help other teachers understand the more artistic processes with children. Mercedes leaves quite the great impression! She’s wonderful at creating a fantastic learning experience, even with adults. She especially cares enough to make sure every child understands, and is having fun with the projects. It was amazing to have that student to teacher base impression of her before sitting down and chatting.

-Hannah

Clay Castles camp. In the first one Mercedes about to load a student’s castle into the kiln.

Where/what do you teach and what ages? 

I teach at the Washington Pavilion, ages pre-k through seniors. I teach drawing, painting sculpture and ceramics. I teach outreach to youth at risk at Juvenile detention center, Multicultural Center, Bowden Youth Center, and other afterschool programs funded by grants in the Action Arts and Science Program (AASP).
I teach private lessons, home school lessons, art smarts (primarily school field trips to the Pavilion) OLLI classes, and pottery classes like ‘Wine on the Wheel’.

Clay castle

What inspired you to begin your teaching career? Was the goal always teaching?

I knew I wanted to be an art teacher in 3rd grade. I had great art teachers in middle and high school that encouraged me to stay in the arts. Lori Boldt, Maureen Kaul and Sara Winterscheidt to name a few.

Is there a specific rule of thumb, style, or method that you like to follow when you teach?

Practice every day! Work those art muscles! Step out of one’s comfort zone. If one always draws the same thing, they’ll get really great at drawing that thing. One should try to draw other things, too! For example, I try to push people away from the classic “corner sunshine” composition and ask them if there is another way to put the sun in their picture. In my opinion, art is 90% problem solving and 10% skill.

8-9 year old students working in the Rogers Clay studio at the Pavilion.

What are your favorite aspects about teaching?

Watching the self-discovery, and winning the students over. Sometimes they come into the room and see the project we will be working on, and the first thing out of their mouth is, “We’re making that? I can’t do that.” Then when class is over they are usually pretty impressed with themselves. 

Paper strip sculpture from a sculpture class with Mercedes.

Is there anything that you would want to change about teaching?

Not now. I taught in the public school system for a few years in Georgia, and grading art for 600 students was a challenge. I also felt I didn’t get to know my students very well. Now I teach in an informal setting at the Pavilion where there are no grades; only learning and exploration and discovery without pressure to make the grade. My students are in my classes because they choose to be, and that feels awesome!

Would you give us a glimpse into your hobbies and interests? What are some of your favorite pass times?

My 15 year old daughter and I like to sing and play a few instruments. I like to play in my garden and I love to feed people delicious food. I do Henna tattoos as a side business, When I get a chance to do art for myself, I like to make drums out of clay and cover them with goat skin. Then I do custom Henna designs on the skins of the drums.

Dr. Seuss style landscapes created by JDC students, through the AASP program for earth day.

Thinking about the future, what is a larger-than-life goal that you might have?

I would love to travel the world. I was able to visit Europe for the first time last year. Ireland was such a grand experience that it wet my appetite for more traveling.

Are you part of, or are you planning any big events with the public?

Well, we do a lot of outreach through the Pavilion at special events like the Pride Festival, Down Town Riverfest and Jazz Fest. It’s usually easy to find our table. Just look for all the kids having fun!

Mercedes teaching the wheel.

Can anyone sign up for classes with you?

Yes. Anyone. You’ll find most of the classes I teach at Washingtonpavilion.org. I’ve done private and semi-private lessons with students from 4 to 94.

Using three words how would you describe yourself and style of teaching?
Passionate, creative and FUN!

Mercedes teaching the wheel, time to paint.

 

Mercedes creating a henna design.

ANNOUNCEMENT: JAM Art and Supplies will be having Mercedes Maltese create henna body art both July and August First Fridays 7-8:30 pm. We’ll be open late till 9 pm.

Henna done by Mercedes.
Henna done by Mercedes.

First Friday Review: December

With a piece of downtown missing, and in the aftermath of road closures and some temporary business closings, a rescheduled First Friday hoped to draw people back to the area, spread cheer, as well as raise funds for the families affected by the building collapse.

Countless times over the last week people have commented how Sioux Falls is like a small town community in a big city. I can definitely attest to that, as someone who grew up in a town of 1000. The way people show up for each other, give to those in need, and work together is pretty fantastic; living downtown feels like home.

The art community seems to reflect that in ways, as well. So many creative minds work hard to make opportunities for each other, and work together to advocate for local art. It is really growing and developing into an amazing and unique scene. It is exciting to be around, and watch happen.

Seriously. Get out and experience a First Friday, attend some of the excellent events we have year round, and really see the beautiful things that come out of where we live. And as someone who hates winter more than you, don’t let the weather be an excuse.

Support small businesses, support local, support art.

Continue reading First Friday Review: December

Megan Boschee: Art Educator

Eugene Field A+ Elementary School is a unique place. It is South Dakota’s first A+ school, and is the only one in Sioux Falls. With A+ standing for “Arts Plus Academics,” arts integration and collaboration are two of the four pillars of the A+ program. The classroom teachers and arts teachers collaborate to ensure that the curriculum is taught through the arts, and the arts taught through the curriculum. It is a creative environment for unique learning. With 80% open enrollment, an arts-oriented education is exactly why students enroll, and exactly what draws educators like Megan Boschee.

Originally from Watertown, Boschee received her arts education degree from Northern State University in Aberdeen. Her first two years of teaching consisted of traveling from school to school teaching art in Sioux Falls. When a more rooted position opened up at Eugene Field, Boschee knew if she did not at least apply, she would regret it. A firm believer that students learn in different ways that need to be accommodated, she was compelled by the idea of a school that focused on arts integration and incorporated Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences. She was elated when she was offered the position, and has been at home there, in her own classroom, for the last 6 years.

Boschee is also no stranger to JAM. She and JAM’s Jess Johnson met when Johnson presented at a teacher in-service. After hearing how JAM could support classroom education, Boschee got in contact with Johnson about presenting at Eugene Field’s Multiple Intelligence Day (MI Day, for short). So far, JAM has presented on creative reuse for two of those events, and has become a student favorite. In fact, some of you may remember the interactive shoebox installation at Art Maze. That was a product of last December’s MI Day. Boschee’s students were thrilled to have the opportunity to be featured in a professional art show.

Another fantastic way Boschee exposes her students to the life of a professional artist is by allowing them to pick and publish their own art on an online portfolio. It is something she has trained nearly all of her students, K-5, to do on an iPad. Pretty phenomenal. Prior to receiving five additional iPads last month, by applying for grant funding through the Sioux Falls Education Foundation, Boschee’s classroom shared only one iPad (yet, still managed to publish around 1,000 pieces). Receiving five additional devices has immensely accelerated students’ ability to publish work in portfolios on Artsonia (1,000 pieces alone since January).

Artsonia is an online student art museum that allows parents/individuals to view and purchase children’s artwork. Funds generated through the site help purchase art supplies for Boschee’s classroom. Check out the rad work of future local Sioux Falls artists here.

Aside from watching musical theater, hanging out with friends and family, watching movies and listening to podcasts, Boschee also enjoys creating her own art. As an artist, she draws inspiration from graphic design, particularly magazine ads, window displays, and billboards. Her artistic focus is largely mosaics, which is apparent in nearly every surface of her house. While it is a creative release that she mainly does for herself, she hopes to market and sell her work in the future.       -TNZ

 Meet Megan Boschee.

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What led you to teach?
My mom is an art teacher, as well. When I was growing up, I was convinced that I was not an artist and that it was my mom’s thing, but not mine. I enjoyed art as a child, but it was never my focus. During my senior year of high school I took a few art classes that I figured would be “easy” electives and I completely fell in love with creating. I actually had a moment in my painting class where I was working on a project and I was so focused that the bell rang for dismissal and I hadn’t even noticed. I remember thinking that if I loved art that much it should definitely be what I do professionally.

What do you hope to teach to your students?
I hope to give my students an exposure to many art styles and techniques, so that they are able to be creative and are filled with a belief that great art can be created in many ways. I also hope that my students develop the courage to continue creating throughout their life. Most of all, I hope that my students will see that art is everywhere they look, and not just in museums or galleries.

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Tell me about your teaching style.
I am strict on procedures, but open to variety. My students know what I expect of them when it comes to taking care of the materials and maintaining order in the classroom. I don’t have a lot of rules (my only rule is “Do your job”), but we practice everything. Every material that is introduced comes with procedures that we review.
While creating, my students know that I will support their artistic choices. I encourage them to try something new, even if it means their project won’t turn out the way they hoped. I’m looking for individual results and not cookie cutter perfection.

What is your favorite medium to teach?
I love to teach painting—especially watercolor. It is a very friendly medium for my young students, and most of my students feel successful with it.

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Student art can be found everywhere in the halls of Eugene Field, particularly in designated galleries, complete with gallery lighting.

What is the most important thing you teach your students?
That art is everywhere. Everything that they touch had an artist involved. Living your life can be a very artistic experience when you view the world in this way.

Who are your favorite artists?
I love Andy Warhol—the way that he took such simple objects and created interesting images. The whole pop art movement is fun and my students love learning about it. I’m also a huge fan of graphic design. I find it very inspiring. Advertisements are my favorite part of magazines.

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If you weren’t an art teacher, what would you do? What is your dream job?
Growing up, I always wanted to be a hair stylist.

What type of art do you personally enjoying making? Crafts?
I paint (acrylic and watercolor) and I create glass mosaics—usually functional pieces like tables.

What keeps you teaching?
Creating is crucial to living a happy life. My job allows me to guide young people toward a life of creating. Teaching provides me with a secure income, a schedule that allows me to spend time with my family and most of all it allows me to create every day.

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How would you like to be remembered?
I hope I will be remembered in a positive way…beyond that I don’t have any specific wishes about my memory. I always tell my students that they get to create a story for their art, and then the viewer can create their own story about it. I would apply that same idea to how people remember me. They can have their own story. I just hope it is a positive one.

 

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3 Non-Monetary Ways You Can Support the Sweet Art Show

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The Sweet Art Show is the annual fundraiser for our nonprofit. It fuels our organization throughout the year. Money raised from this event is critical to the success of JAM, but that does not mean we do not appreciate everything else our friends do to support us. Here are 3 great non-monetary ways to get involved with JAM!

  1. Get social for us. Share the event on Facebook. Invite your friends. Like our Sweet Art Show posts. Comment and encourage. There is this thing with social media called “going viral” and the more views we get for our show, the more our event will be seen by a newer audience through the complicated Facebook algorithms. Science? Maybe.
  2. Donate your time. We are always looking for volunteers for the show. From greeting people, to taking free will donations, to setting up and tearing down, there are so many hands needed to make the Sweet Art Show successful. It is actually really fun, and you meet some great people and new friends.
  3. Donate a skill. The Sweet Art Show takes quite a few talents to make the show successful. Are you a pro on the phones? We would love to get some volunteers to call out for corporate sponsor donations. Are you great at writing? We are always looking for bloggers to write posts for us (like this one). Are you a social media whiz? We would love to have live-tweeting commentary throughout the show.

JAM would not be where we are today without volunteering and donations, and most importantly, the belief in our cause from so many people in this community. We are truly grateful for everything this community has done for us over the past year and a half. We look forward to the show and what the rest of 2016 will bring! See you at the show on February 12, from 5:30 – 8:30 p.m., at the Icon Event Hall + Lounge.

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5 Reasons You Should Bring Your Kids to the Sweet Art Show

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Can’t find a sitter so you can come out and support the Sweet Art Show? Excellent. Bring them along!

  1. Kids are our favorite. For real. We love kids. Teaching kids in our group classes, private lessons, and seeing their eyes light up when their little, creative minds get to spinning – there is nothing like it. We love kids. We would love to see yours at the Sweet Art Show.
  2. It is a kid-friendly event. We want families to attend. We are serving ice cream for everyone from little to big. There will also be some tasty snacks to munch on, as well. There is something for everyone (including adult beverages for mom and dad).
  3. It is winter, and activities for kids are hard to find sometimes. So, bundle up the family and get out of the house to support a great cause.
  4. There is a kid activity table. Let your child’s imagination run wild with the arts and crafts table we will have set up for them to play at. Socialize with friends and let your little ones have fun.
  5. Let them experience an art show. Have you ever taken your kids to an art show? This would be a fantastic opportunity to show them how to admire and appreciate art, as well as meet the people who created the art.

The Sweet Art Show is the annual fundraiser for our nonprofit. It fuels our organization throughout the year. Money raised from this event is critical to the success of JAM. We look forward to seeing you at the show on February 12 from 5:30 – 8:30 p.m. at Icon Event Hall + Lounge.

JAM-Profile-Signature_Katie

3 Reasons Teachers Should Attend the Sweet Art Show

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The Sweet Art Show is the annual fundraiser for our nonprofit. It fuels our organization throughout the year. Money raised from this event is critical to the success of JAM.

Teachers are one of our primary customers at the JAM store. We love helping teachers find what they need, inspire projects or provide ideas for classrooms and students! Are you a teacher? Here are 5 great reasons to come out and support the event!

  1. JAM is here for your classroom needs. JAM’s primary purpose is to offer deeply discounted art and craft supplies to anyone and everyone. From markers and crayons, to drawing pads to old frames to fabric, the store is filled to the brim with items you could be using in your classroom for decorations, projects, crafts, or even to stock up on extra supplies for student’s that don’t have any.
  2. JAM is here for your students. If you do not know about JAM, your students may not either. Many kids in the Sioux Falls School District have a hard time paying for lunch, let alone art supplies. Promote JAM in your classroom! Let your students and student’s  parents know where they can get quality art supplies that do not break the bank.
  3. Other teachers will be there. Every year, we interview teachers in our Art Educator Interview series. (Know of someone who should be featured? Contact us!) We love hearing what teachers have to say about art in our community and classrooms. Mingle with other art supporters and bounce creative ideas off of each other.

We look forward to seeing you at the show on February 12 from 5:30 – 8:30 p.m. at the Icon Event Hall + Lounge.

JAM-Profile-Signature_Katie

5 Reasons to Attend the Sweet Art Show

 

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The Sweet Art Show is the annual fundraiser for our nonprofit. It fuels our organization throughout the year. Money raised from this event is critical to the success of JAM! Here are 5 great reasons to be there.

  1. You have never even heard of JAM Art and Supplies. Great! This is the perfect opportunity to see what our nonprofit is all about. Mingle with artists. Admire artwork. Bid on raffle prizes.
  2. You like ice cream. Who doesn’t? I happen to love ice cream and the gourmet ice cream bar served at the Sweet Art Show is unlike any sundae bar you will ever experience.
  3. You need kid-friendly events and activities to attend. It’s hard to find things to do in the winter. This event is perfect! We want kids to tag along! Not only do we have some snacks and sweets to munch on, but we also have a kid’s activity table for them to play at.
  4. You love supporting the arts. JAM is committed to creating a thriving art community in Sioux Falls. With interviews of artists, children’s art classes, private art lessons, deeply discounted art supplies in the store and even yoga for toddlers, JAM is whole-heartedly striving to provide more and more opportunities for you (and your kids) to be involved in the arts in Sioux Falls.
  5. You love social gatherings. Awesome! There will be tons of people at the event. Make it a girl’s night out with a pit stop at the show, bring your family or pop in by yourself. You’ll be sure to see someone you know, or at least walk away having met some of the finest art enthusiasts in Sioux Falls!

The Sweet Art Show is truly a laid-back event. A free will donation will be taken at the door. We look forward to seeing all of your sweet faces at the show on February 12 from 5:30 – 8:30 p.m. at the Icon Event Hall + Lounge.

JAM-Profile-Signature_Katie