Tag Archives: classes

7 Reasons to “Make Art Your Business”

The “Make Art Your Business” class series this January and February is still open for registration! The sessions, led by Claudia Dail, are designed to help artists learn business basics, and consequently make their art business a success.  Not sure exactly what “business basics” can help you with? Well, we’ve compiled a list of seven reasons why taking the classes would be a great start to the new year for you and your business. Take a look!

  1. It’s All About You! While each of the classes focus on you, the first session in particular is all about you; it focuses on your goals and vision for making your art a business. If you don’t know what your goals are just yet, don’t worry – that’s what the class is for. It will help you decide what you want your niche to be and how to set goals and reach them.
  2. Build Your Strengths, Strengthen Your Weaknesses. The classes also help you find your personal strengths and weaknesses in running a business. Knowing where you excel and where you need to focus more energy to succeed is an important skill to learn for this process, and builds on the goals you develop for yourself and your art.
  3. Confidence Building. Along with developing your goals and strengths, the workshops offer opportunities to hone your skills. Not your artistic skills (you’ve already got those!), but the skills you need to market yourself. 
  4. Safe Practice Space. As a business person, you’ll need to learn to pitch yourself and business. The workshop offers a place to practice and develop this pitch without too much pressure.
  5. Learn About the Sioux Falls Art Community. Since you’ll be learning to pitch yourself, you’ll need to know about the community you’re pitching to. That means learning about the Sioux Falls art scene and making connections with other artists. The classes offer both of these, and help you discover where and how to access your niche community.
  6. Build Relationships with Other Artists. Speaking of the Sioux Falls art community, attending the workshops will connect you with other artists. Connections are important, and building relationships with other people in the art community helps make those connections.
  7. Learn to Value Your Art Competitively. The last session in the series helps you learn how to put a price on your work. You’ll learn about perceived value and how to register your art, along with learning how to keep records and reports.

And finally, in Claudia’s own words:  “It is up to each individual to decide how engaged they want to be. Those who go for it come away with far more than what transpires in the classroom.”

What are you waiting for???

REGISTER HERE! Deadline is January 8. Space is limited.

 

AN EDUCATOR INTERVIEW: MERCEDES MALTESE

As a fellow employee of the Washington Pavilion, I have had the chance to meet Mercedes before interviewing her for JAM’s Educator Interview. We meet regularly at the Pavilion to go over future lesson plans, and she is there to help other teachers understand the more artistic processes with children. Mercedes leaves quite the great impression! She’s wonderful at creating a fantastic learning experience, even with adults. She especially cares enough to make sure every child understands, and is having fun with the projects. It was amazing to have that student to teacher base impression of her before sitting down and chatting.

-Hannah

Clay Castles camp. In the first one Mercedes about to load a student’s castle into the kiln.

Where/what do you teach and what ages? 

I teach at the Washington Pavilion, ages pre-k through seniors. I teach drawing, painting sculpture and ceramics. I teach outreach to youth at risk at Juvenile detention center, Multicultural Center, Bowden Youth Center, and other afterschool programs funded by grants in the Action Arts and Science Program (AASP).
I teach private lessons, home school lessons, art smarts (primarily school field trips to the Pavilion) OLLI classes, and pottery classes like ‘Wine on the Wheel’.

Clay castle

What inspired you to begin your teaching career? Was the goal always teaching?

I knew I wanted to be an art teacher in 3rd grade. I had great art teachers in middle and high school that encouraged me to stay in the arts. Lori Boldt, Maureen Kaul and Sara Winterscheidt to name a few.

Is there a specific rule of thumb, style, or method that you like to follow when you teach?

Practice every day! Work those art muscles! Step out of one’s comfort zone. If one always draws the same thing, they’ll get really great at drawing that thing. One should try to draw other things, too! For example, I try to push people away from the classic “corner sunshine” composition and ask them if there is another way to put the sun in their picture. In my opinion, art is 90% problem solving and 10% skill.

8-9 year old students working in the Rogers Clay studio at the Pavilion.

What are your favorite aspects about teaching?

Watching the self-discovery, and winning the students over. Sometimes they come into the room and see the project we will be working on, and the first thing out of their mouth is, “We’re making that? I can’t do that.” Then when class is over they are usually pretty impressed with themselves. 

Paper strip sculpture from a sculpture class with Mercedes.

Is there anything that you would want to change about teaching?

Not now. I taught in the public school system for a few years in Georgia, and grading art for 600 students was a challenge. I also felt I didn’t get to know my students very well. Now I teach in an informal setting at the Pavilion where there are no grades; only learning and exploration and discovery without pressure to make the grade. My students are in my classes because they choose to be, and that feels awesome!

Would you give us a glimpse into your hobbies and interests? What are some of your favorite pass times?

My 15 year old daughter and I like to sing and play a few instruments. I like to play in my garden and I love to feed people delicious food. I do Henna tattoos as a side business, When I get a chance to do art for myself, I like to make drums out of clay and cover them with goat skin. Then I do custom Henna designs on the skins of the drums.

Dr. Seuss style landscapes created by JDC students, through the AASP program for earth day.

Thinking about the future, what is a larger-than-life goal that you might have?

I would love to travel the world. I was able to visit Europe for the first time last year. Ireland was such a grand experience that it wet my appetite for more traveling.

Are you part of, or are you planning any big events with the public?

Well, we do a lot of outreach through the Pavilion at special events like the Pride Festival, Down Town Riverfest and Jazz Fest. It’s usually easy to find our table. Just look for all the kids having fun!

Mercedes teaching the wheel.

Can anyone sign up for classes with you?

Yes. Anyone. You’ll find most of the classes I teach at Washingtonpavilion.org. I’ve done private and semi-private lessons with students from 4 to 94.

Using three words how would you describe yourself and style of teaching?
Passionate, creative and FUN!

Mercedes teaching the wheel, time to paint.

 

Mercedes creating a henna design.

ANNOUNCEMENT: JAM Art and Supplies will be having Mercedes Maltese create henna body art both July and August First Fridays 7-8:30 pm. We’ll be open late till 9 pm.

Henna done by Mercedes.
Henna done by Mercedes.

5 Ways to Support JAM Art and Supplies

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The JAM Creative Reuse Store would not be happening if it wasn’t for you. Over the past few months, we’ve met some incredible artists and creatives in the art community – you know who you are. We’ve loved collaborating with you and meeting you, hearing your stories and needs. Plus, we love showing you off. Continue reading 5 Ways to Support JAM Art and Supplies

5 Reasons the JAM Creative Reuse Store will benefit Sioux Falls

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This is it. The final countdown is upon us. The JAM Creative Reuse Store will be opening in Exposure Gallery in Sioux Falls this Friday. We invite you to attend the First Friday events around Sioux Falls on Friday as well as to stop by and see us! To countdown to our big day, we will be serving up a series of posts this week to let you know what JAM is REALLY all about. Below are five reasons why the JAM Creative Reuse Store will benefit Sioux Falls and the Sioux Falls creative community: Continue reading 5 Reasons the JAM Creative Reuse Store will benefit Sioux Falls

Making Sense Of It All: The Museum Of Visual Materials

As an artist, relationships with galleries, patrons, collectors, and the many other varieties of art enthusiasts become just as important, if not more so, than the created work itself. Creating art and showing it in a gallery space is not, in the least, simply about making money. Exhibiting works of art creates communication with the world outside of the studio. The artist and the gallerist share a certain level of involvement and appreciation with the art. –JAM blogger Jordan Thornton

Downtown Sioux Falls is rich with beautiful, historic architecture. One of the oldest buildings there is home to a non-profit by the name of The Museum of Visual Materials. A few days ago, I had the pleasure of interviewing Anna at the MoVM. Our morning was filled with hot coffee, a tour of the museum, and a conversation that shed light on the vision behind the museum.

The first question I had for Anna was not one that required much research, but ended up providing the majority of the information I was seeking to learn about the museum.

JAM: “Why is it called The Museum of Visual Materials?”

Anna: “The founder of the museum, Dr. Rose Faithe, named the museum after her uncle Dr. Mathew Faithe’s truck. He had labeled it the “Museum of Visual Materials” and drove around town showing the community the items he had collected throughout his many travels. She also wanted a place where the five senses could be explored.”

We then delved into the where and how of discovering the five senses throughout the museum.

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Sight: The art gallery, the reason I had emailed Anna in the first place. The museum alternates artists every two months. Those interested in displaying their work Continue reading Making Sense Of It All: The Museum Of Visual Materials