Tag Archives: art

RUG AND RELIC

With some foot-tapping folk music playing, I had the chance to go into Rug & Relic to interview Steve and Tove Bormes. The time spent speaking with the Bormes was incredibly informing and entertaining! Right away when you walk through the doors, they make you feel welcome. It’s almost as if I was chatting with some long time friends that I hadn’t spoken to or seen for years, but still have such a fun connection with them. Even in conversation, they play off of each other’s strengths and make each other better. You can see they take humble pride in their work with Turkish art, and the local and regional artists displayed in the building. It’s clear that they are personable people that love to take the time to chat with anyone about what they love: art. I encourage anyone to stop by to take a longer look into the fantastic pieces presented here, or even just to ask some questions.     -Hannah

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Erin Nguyen: Art Educator

A morning bell rings at Roosevelt High School, and outside a room in the deepest recess of the C Wing of visual and performing arts, Erin Nguyen waits smiling outside her ceramics classroom. As the high-schoolers file in, I note that it’s only the second week of a new semester, and Erin is able to greet each of her students by name.

Known as “Miss Winn,” to her students, Erin lives in Sioux Falls with her husband, Dan. She has ten years of teaching experience, and has spent the last two working her “dream job” at Roosevelt. Consummately expressive with her face and her words, Erin laughs easily and speaks at a leisurely pace, drawing out the vowels of certain words, turning her conversation into a kind of melody.

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PIPER FINE ART GALLERY

A little bit off the First Friday beaten path, right on what might be considered the cusp of downtown, sits a real gem. Nestled on the corner of 27th and Minnesota is Piper Custom Framing and Fine Art Gallery.  As a custom frame shop foremost, it’s possible that it might not even be on your radar as a gallery to stop in and visit. Living only a few blocks north, I have driven past the storefront countless times. Each time curiously eyeing it. Done the same? Save yourself prolonged wonderment. Go in.

The gallery is cozy, and full of carefully selected, beautiful art from Midwest artists – print to sculpture and everything in-between. Not only that, the framing selection makes Hobby Lobby’s wall o’ frame look like a cheap floozy, and the staff are incredibly welcoming, experienced and wonderful to talk to. They welcome local artists with open arms, and are always willing to sit down and have a chat with them.

You can feel that this is a place where quality, and the individual customer experience is the top priority. They care immensely about what they do, and that passion shows the minute you walk in the door. Reaffirming, once again, that there is really nothing better than small business, and really nothing better than buying local art.

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FIRST FRIDAY REVIEW: AUGUST

I’ve lived in Sioux Falls for three years now, but this was the first time that anyone in my family had been to a First Friday. While my dad enjoyed a couple of beers outside Stogeez Cigar Lounge, I explored all of the great art. At the end of the evening, we both remarked that we’d never seen so much diversity in Sioux Falls all in one place. It was beautiful to see.

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POST PILGRIM GALLERY

Before adjectives started rolling, my immediate thought upon walking into Post Pilgrim Art Gallery was, sweeeeeet. The gallery space has an edgy, clean, raw, industrial, underground feel. A caliber all its own, with prime Native art, and a badass logo to boot. (Gah, I love that logo.)

After introducing myself, and complementing Jennifer White [Post Pilgrim’s curator and owner] on the space, she was quick to show me what she had been up to already that morning. She laid 4 paintings out on the floor next to her easel. It wasn’t quite 10 o’clock. The only thing I had managed to complete by that point in the morning were a few strokes of eyeliner. One thing was immediately clear, this chick had hustle. Not only that, she had a passion that sparked a fire in her belly, and ignited her entire being. I knew I was going to love doing this interview.

Located in the lower level of Last Stop CD Shop on East 10th Street, Post Pilgrim Art Gallery’s mission is to celebrate Native heritage with the work of established and emerging Native artists. It’s filling a void Sioux Falls desperately needs filled, and with its grand opening just this past April, it has a bright future ahead. I’m excited to see where White takes it. Continue reading POST PILGRIM GALLERY

Let’s Celebrate Jordan Thornton’s Artist Residency

Landing an artist residency is a big deal. So when an artist does, it’s cause for celebration.

One of JAM’s favorite artists, Jordan Thornton, has “nailed” down her first artist residency!

It happens to be in Vermont, and there happen to be fees and costs that come along with that, so the Sioux Falls community has the awesome chance to help Jordan in her journey.

But before I get to that, here’s a little more information about Jordan.

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She’s a printmaker with a deeply-rooted love of nature, which you can easily see in her work. Handpulled and hand-printed woodcut prints, often displayed in shadowboxes (that she usually makes herself) are her forte.

Jordan describes her current work as having a focus “on plant imagery, primarily the roots. The visual part of these pieces is of the physical plant, while the thought behind the work focuses on our own roots: what holds us to a place, a person, a pursuit.”

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If that’s not enough info about her craft, check out our Inspired Interview of Jordan.

She’s been honing her craft for years. And she’s also been applying for residencies for years. And then the Vermont Studio Center in Johnson, VT offered her an artist-in-residence spot for the upcoming month of August.

Here’s the catch: getting to Vermont isn’t free.

So that’s where you come in.

Jordan’s got a Kickstarter campaign that’ll cover the remainder of her residency fee and travel costs. But, most importantly, this campaign puts her art into the hands of the people investing in it.

To kick off the campaign, Coffea Downtown is hosting a launch party which doubles as the artist reception for Jordan’s three month show at Coffea. The party’s going down on May 6th from 6-8pm.

If you can’t be there to high five her and join the fun in person, you can still join the fun online:

First Friday Review: April

I have been living in Sioux Falls for about two years now, and am humbled to admit this was the first time I have really been able to fully take advantage of a First Friday. Like Dylan eloquently put in last month’s review, “If you have not been downtown on a First Friday, you are seriously not tasting the heart of Sioux Falls.”

I have tasted, and it is good.

For being April, it was an unseasonably cold evening. Whiskey promised to warm my bones at the end of the night, but not before beholding some of Sioux Falls’ finest. Here is a little recap of some of the happenings.

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Sherri Sherard: Art Educator

Art teachers are blessed in Sioux Falls, said Sherri Sherard, art educator at Edison Middle School. They are given leeway, and are able to be creative in how they teach and in what they teach.

That creative allowance shows in the array of tools and materials that line Sherard’s art supply room shelves. Students in her classroom are able to experience a wide range of artistic trades and crafts. Like many art educators know, not every student is going to be an artist. However, as Sherard notes, at least they gain the experience and process of creating certain things, like using a loom to weave. Sherard’s lessons are not just a practice in technique, they are woven with culture and history. 

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Megan Boschee: Art Educator

Eugene Field A+ Elementary School is a unique place. It is South Dakota’s first A+ school, and is the only one in Sioux Falls. With A+ standing for “Arts Plus Academics,” arts integration and collaboration are two of the four pillars of the A+ program. The classroom teachers and arts teachers collaborate to ensure that the curriculum is taught through the arts, and the arts taught through the curriculum. It is a creative environment for unique learning. With 80% open enrollment, an arts-oriented education is exactly why students enroll, and exactly what draws educators like Megan Boschee.

Originally from Watertown, Boschee received her arts education degree from Northern State University in Aberdeen. Her first two years of teaching consisted of traveling from school to school teaching art in Sioux Falls. When a more rooted position opened up at Eugene Field, Boschee knew if she did not at least apply, she would regret it. A firm believer that students learn in different ways that need to be accommodated, she was compelled by the idea of a school that focused on arts integration and incorporated Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences. She was elated when she was offered the position, and has been at home there, in her own classroom, for the last 6 years.

Boschee is also no stranger to JAM. She and JAM’s Jess Johnson met when Johnson presented at a teacher in-service. After hearing how JAM could support classroom education, Boschee got in contact with Johnson about presenting at Eugene Field’s Multiple Intelligence Day (MI Day, for short). So far, JAM has presented on creative reuse for two of those events, and has become a student favorite. In fact, some of you may remember the interactive shoebox installation at Art Maze. That was a product of last December’s MI Day. Boschee’s students were thrilled to have the opportunity to be featured in a professional art show.

Another fantastic way Boschee exposes her students to the life of a professional artist is by allowing them to pick and publish their own art on an online portfolio. It is something she has trained nearly all of her students, K-5, to do on an iPad. Pretty phenomenal. Prior to receiving five additional iPads last month, by applying for grant funding through the Sioux Falls Education Foundation, Boschee’s classroom shared only one iPad (yet, still managed to publish around 1,000 pieces). Receiving five additional devices has immensely accelerated students’ ability to publish work in portfolios on Artsonia (1,000 pieces alone since January).

Artsonia is an online student art museum that allows parents/individuals to view and purchase children’s artwork. Funds generated through the site help purchase art supplies for Boschee’s classroom. Check out the rad work of future local Sioux Falls artists here.

Aside from watching musical theater, hanging out with friends and family, watching movies and listening to podcasts, Boschee also enjoys creating her own art. As an artist, she draws inspiration from graphic design, particularly magazine ads, window displays, and billboards. Her artistic focus is largely mosaics, which is apparent in nearly every surface of her house. While it is a creative release that she mainly does for herself, she hopes to market and sell her work in the future.       -TNZ

 Meet Megan Boschee.

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What led you to teach?
My mom is an art teacher, as well. When I was growing up, I was convinced that I was not an artist and that it was my mom’s thing, but not mine. I enjoyed art as a child, but it was never my focus. During my senior year of high school I took a few art classes that I figured would be “easy” electives and I completely fell in love with creating. I actually had a moment in my painting class where I was working on a project and I was so focused that the bell rang for dismissal and I hadn’t even noticed. I remember thinking that if I loved art that much it should definitely be what I do professionally.

What do you hope to teach to your students?
I hope to give my students an exposure to many art styles and techniques, so that they are able to be creative and are filled with a belief that great art can be created in many ways. I also hope that my students develop the courage to continue creating throughout their life. Most of all, I hope that my students will see that art is everywhere they look, and not just in museums or galleries.

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Tell me about your teaching style.
I am strict on procedures, but open to variety. My students know what I expect of them when it comes to taking care of the materials and maintaining order in the classroom. I don’t have a lot of rules (my only rule is “Do your job”), but we practice everything. Every material that is introduced comes with procedures that we review.
While creating, my students know that I will support their artistic choices. I encourage them to try something new, even if it means their project won’t turn out the way they hoped. I’m looking for individual results and not cookie cutter perfection.

What is your favorite medium to teach?
I love to teach painting—especially watercolor. It is a very friendly medium for my young students, and most of my students feel successful with it.

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Student art can be found everywhere in the halls of Eugene Field, particularly in designated galleries, complete with gallery lighting.

What is the most important thing you teach your students?
That art is everywhere. Everything that they touch had an artist involved. Living your life can be a very artistic experience when you view the world in this way.

Who are your favorite artists?
I love Andy Warhol—the way that he took such simple objects and created interesting images. The whole pop art movement is fun and my students love learning about it. I’m also a huge fan of graphic design. I find it very inspiring. Advertisements are my favorite part of magazines.

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If you weren’t an art teacher, what would you do? What is your dream job?
Growing up, I always wanted to be a hair stylist.

What type of art do you personally enjoying making? Crafts?
I paint (acrylic and watercolor) and I create glass mosaics—usually functional pieces like tables.

What keeps you teaching?
Creating is crucial to living a happy life. My job allows me to guide young people toward a life of creating. Teaching provides me with a secure income, a schedule that allows me to spend time with my family and most of all it allows me to create every day.

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How would you like to be remembered?
I hope I will be remembered in a positive way…beyond that I don’t have any specific wishes about my memory. I always tell my students that they get to create a story for their art, and then the viewer can create their own story about it. I would apply that same idea to how people remember me. They can have their own story. I just hope it is a positive one.

 

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3 Non-Monetary Ways You Can Support the Sweet Art Show

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The Sweet Art Show is the annual fundraiser for our nonprofit. It fuels our organization throughout the year. Money raised from this event is critical to the success of JAM, but that does not mean we do not appreciate everything else our friends do to support us. Here are 3 great non-monetary ways to get involved with JAM!

  1. Get social for us. Share the event on Facebook. Invite your friends. Like our Sweet Art Show posts. Comment and encourage. There is this thing with social media called “going viral” and the more views we get for our show, the more our event will be seen by a newer audience through the complicated Facebook algorithms. Science? Maybe.
  2. Donate your time. We are always looking for volunteers for the show. From greeting people, to taking free will donations, to setting up and tearing down, there are so many hands needed to make the Sweet Art Show successful. It is actually really fun, and you meet some great people and new friends.
  3. Donate a skill. The Sweet Art Show takes quite a few talents to make the show successful. Are you a pro on the phones? We would love to get some volunteers to call out for corporate sponsor donations. Are you great at writing? We are always looking for bloggers to write posts for us (like this one). Are you a social media whiz? We would love to have live-tweeting commentary throughout the show.

JAM would not be where we are today without volunteering and donations, and most importantly, the belief in our cause from so many people in this community. We are truly grateful for everything this community has done for us over the past year and a half. We look forward to the show and what the rest of 2016 will bring! See you at the show on February 12, from 5:30 – 8:30 p.m., at the Icon Event Hall + Lounge.

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