Category Archives: Uncategorized

FIRST FRIDAY REVIEW: OCTOBER

This month, First Friday featured a slew of artists participating in the Art and Wine Walk. Most locations had the artists inside their shops, so the looming threat of a downpour was no concern. The rain held off just long enough for the outdoor locations to show off their craft. Instead of going to every single stop on the walk, since there were so many great artists there, I picked the “You don’t see that everyday!” locations.  ~Rachel

Rebekah Scott Designs at Atoley Spa

She learned how to sew in 4-H as a child. Then, one Christmas as a “poor newlywed,” Rebekah Scott realized she did not have to buy gifts. Family and friends received handmade gifts that year, and Rebekah realized that she could start a business with her craft and still raise a family. Thirteen years later, she is still making purses. Her website, shoprsd.com, is based on an interactive system that lets visitors pick designs and see different fabrics on the item they choose. Her wares on display at Atoley Spa had something to please everyone; a variety of styles, colors and patterns were available with more on her site.

Nathan Rueckert at A League of Your Own

“America At The Seams” is Nathan Ruecker’s latest and largest work, and also the name of his soon to be released book. For almost two decades he has worked with old tattered baseballs, turning them into various forms of art. He makes everything from keychains to crosses. Nathan got his inspiration after the September 11th attacks, and he played baseball in college. His work has expanded from the original idea of American flags and really taken off over the years. He works with baseballs because the sport is still “America’s favorite pastime,” and keeps the game close. See more of his work on his website.

“America at the Seams”

Swen’s Reclaimed Wares at Say Anything Jewelry

Mike Swenson brought his reclaimed wood art pieces to his sister’s shop for First Friday, along with some of his tools. Mike kayaks on the rivers, and his state carvings are often inspired by these rivers; he can take the less interesting shapes of some states and make them dynamic by carving in the rivers that run through them. Most of the wood Mike uses comes from barns or pallets, and all of it is reclaimed. Find the Minnesota native on Snapchat to see in progress works at swenmn, or see his shop on Etsy to buy his art.

Mike’s tool set up at Say Anything

Amy Jarding Weaving at Coffea

Amy Jarding, co-founder of JAM and a weaver for three years, set up shop at Coffea on Friday night. Mostly self taught through YouTube videos, Amy creates vibrant and stylish woven pieces in many sizes. Her large works immediately catch the eye in the space, and the hanging accents add color to the ambience. She uses new and used yarn on her frame loom, and sometimes even found objects. Follow her on Instagram or Facebook to see more of her work with weaving and other artistic endeavors.

Parklet Design Competition at Sioux Falls Design Center

South Dakota State University students of all grades submitted sculpture ideas for the Sioux Falls Design Center Parklet Design Competition this Friday. Six student groups were selected to take over parking spots near the 11th and Phillips intersection and set up their designs that passerby could vote on with tokens provided. Designs included a wide spectrum of ideas influenced by pop culture and nature. An interactive game made of balloons and complete with slingshot was compiled by a group including student Walker Kropenske. He said the piece was fairly simple and based on the game Angry Birds.  “What’s That Sound” inspired by Blue Man Group and Pinterest crafts was put together by a group of four including Rachael Selberg. She said her group wanted to create an interactive experience for children and adults too. “Feathers,” a social media positivity campaign that passerby were able to add to (#WhatMakesMeFly), was created by Liz and Angela. They were hoping to spread positive energy on social media in Sioux Falls. A stained glass house inspired Jaylee, Gaby and Samuel for their cellophane built tent. Unfortunately, the sun did not come out much to make their piece shine they way they hoped. “Palisades Pavilion” was created by Kyle Franta and Thomas Schneider, inspired by Palisades State Park and a pit stop for those attending the parklet event. All of the sculptures were large enough to fill their parking spots and draw passerby in. Learn more about the Sioux Falls Design Center and their upcoming competitions on their website.

“Palisades Pavilion”
Liz and Angela with “Feathers”
Angry Birds Interactive
“What’s That Sound?”

CFA: FERNSON ON 8TH GALLERY

  • Fernson is soliciting submissions for a small exhibit of artwork to be hung at Fernson on 8th, located in eastbank of downtown Sioux Falls.
  • Submission is free, and will be selected by the Fernson team.
  • This form has no deadline – artists will be selected as needed.
  • Exhibits last between 3 and 6 months.
  • You have the option of hosting a reception at the beginning or end of your exhibit.
  • Contact mitch@fernson.com with any questions.

SUBMISSION FORM

CFA: 38th Annual Artists of the Plains Art Show & Sale

The Center for Western Studies at Augustana University is now accepting artists’ applications for the 38th Annual Artists of the Plains Art Show & Sale to be held February 16-18, 2018, at the Hilton Garden Inn in downtown Sioux Falls.

We are excited to schedule this year’s show in conjunction with the National Pheasant Fest & Quail Classic, the nation’s largest upland hunting and conservation event. More than 20,000 people attend the annual trade show which is expected to bring thousands of people to Sioux Falls this year — crowds eager to buy beautiful artwork!

The Artists of the Plains Show is selective, featuring around two dozen professional artists each year with an eye toward including new talent. Given the high volume of potential patrons the Pheasant Fest & Quail Classic promises, we anticipate strong competition for this year’s show. Be sure to submit your application before the deadline of October 6, 2017.

As a signature program of the Center for Western Studies, this show and sale is designed to educate the public about the cultural importance and variety of regional art and artists. The largest and longest running show of its kind in the region, Artists of the Plains is an annual highlight of the Center’s Art Program and Educational Exhibits, one of several programming areas supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The hours of this year’s show will be:

  • Friday, February 16, Premiere Showing: 5:00 – 9:00 p.m., with the awards program at approximately 8:00 p.m.
  • Saturday, February 17, 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
  • Sunday, February 18, 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

The Center for Western Studies offers CASH AWARDS in the following categories: Two-Dimensional Best of Show ($200 first place and $100 second place) and Three-Dimensional Best of Show ($200 first place and $100 second place).

The show is a gift from the Center for Western Studies and its supporters to the artists and collectors of the Northern Plains. All staff time necessary to prepare, market, and conduct the show is underwritten by the Center’s operations budget and endowment. The Center does not take a commission on any artist’s event sales.

To be considered for the 2018 show, complete the artist questionnaire and return it to CWS by October 6, 2017. The Art Committee of the CWS Board of Directors will meet in October to select up to 25 artists to invite to the 2018 show and sale. Our visitors expect high quality and a variety of artwork at this event. Artists are asked to have a minimum of five original pieces for show and sale.

For more information or to ask questions, please contact Education Assistant Kristi Thomas at 605.274.4005 or kristi.thomas@augie.edu. The artist questionnaire can also be found on our website at: www.augie.edu/cws.

FIRST FRIDAY: AN ARTIST’S PERSPECTIVE BEHIND THE SCENES

September’s First Friday was filled with new experiences and new friendships. I challenged myself this month by doing as many different and exciting things as I could. Having my artwork present in two separate group art shows, while simultaneously displaying quality, was a big part of that challenge. 

My First Friday morning began with appearing on KELOLAND News to chat about the 5th Annual Tallgrass Recovery Art Show at Exposure Gallery, along with artists Betsy Ashworth and Joan Zephier. Personally, this wasn’t a first time being interviewed about my artwork, but it was a first having it air on television. As nerve-wracking as it was to piece together what I’d say to KELO, it was all worth it. Being able to have the chance to speak about a powerfully impacting exhibition is well worth any amount of nerves. I’m so thankful for Joan and everyone involved with the show.

“Here’s something you could do tonight. #Repost @mattholsen
・・・
The 5th Annual Tallgrass Recovery Art Show is tonight from 5-9 at Exposure Gallery. A preview of the amazing pieces coming up on KELOLAND News. #kelonews” -KELOLAND on Instagram.

The most surprising thing was the intense amount of people that showed up just for this healing event. I’m, at times, the type of person that would rather stay home and resist any chance to interact with people. Then there are special times that I’m able to move into a healthier mood that pushes me to meet folks and reach out. The reception was an incredibly eventful first.

A fun, interactive aspect to the exhibit is the People’s Choice Award. Attendees were asked to cast their vote before they left. With the pieces being displayed the entire month of September, I hope you have a chance to stop by to look around.

I enjoy seeing written, story-like pieces beside a visual artwork. It’s even more powerful when the viewer gets a written accompaniment to help lead their thinking, and walk them down a path of interpretation. I like to look for little body cues as viewers take in my work, as well. When someone is reading what I’ve placed before them, and they realize how it fits with everything else they’re seeing, that’s one of my favorite moments. It’s almost like an electric connection is sparked inside their eyes. Witnessing people light up with a specific passion for any artwork is a treat.

At 7:00 p.m. I had to hop, skip, and jump over to Vishnu Bunny Tattoo for the other group show I took part in this month. This show served as an introduction to local artists that the community may not have known about otherwise.

Both Exposure and Third Eye Gallery at Vishnu are constantly brainstorming new topics and themes for artists to submit and present on. Keep your eyes peeled for calls for art. A great resource is our very own Call For Art page on JAM’s website!

I’m not a fan of bland artist statements. I like to give information in a more engaging and fun way. The “theme” of my work displayed at Vishnu is similar to a timeline with missing chunks. So, I decided to make my statement more of a funky story to follow along with. I noticed that during the night, I had to point this fact out to folks. Most of whom I chatted with had never heard of an artist statement that didn’t just state the obvious facts.

For those of you reading who are wondering how to get your work into galleries, just keep going. Connect. Keep pushing. Keep meeting people. Keep working on your art. Keep taking in constructive criticism. Keep positive. What more is there to say?
www.patreon.com/HannahWendt

www.HannahWendt.com

An Evening of Art, Architecture and Community

with keynote by Dale Lamphere
AIA South Dakota
Thursday, September 14, 2017 from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM (CDT)
Sioux Falls, SD
TICKETS HERE

Renowned sculptor and South Dakota artist laureate Dale Lamphere will give a free, public presentation as part of a celebration of art, architecture and community on Thursday, Sept. 14 in Sioux Falls.

An Evening of Art, Architecture and Community is sponsored by Architecture Incorporated and presented by the American Institute of Architects (AIA) South Dakota and the Great Plains chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA). The event begins at 7 p.m. at the Best Western Plus Ramkota Hotel on 3200 W. Maple St., with tickets available to the public at no charge.

AIA South Dakota will also recognize SDSU alumnus and business leader Jerry Lohr of J. Lohr Vineyards and Wines for his unparalleled support of the SDSU Department of Architecture.

Lamphere sculpted the breathtaking Dignity Statue that perches atop a bluff overlooking the Missouri River in Chamberlain and has been further immortalized in specialty state license plates. Lamphere has also been commissioned to build the Arc of Dreams, a massive stainless steel sculpture that will span the Big Sioux River in downtown Sioux Falls.

Lamphere will give a solo keynote presentation and take questions from the audience. An Evening of Art, Architecture and Community will also feature a brief panel on how art and architecture intermingle to shape community that will include:

Panelist: Dan Pitera, FAIA, executive director of the Detroit Collaborative Design Center and recipient of the coveted Whitney Young Award.
Panelist: Tanya Olson, ASLA, PLA, principal/owner at Tallgrass Landscape Architecture in Custer.
Panelist: Tim Barry, artist and managing partner of Hot Shops Art Center in Omaha.
Panelist: Kristine Bjerke, AIA, principal architect of Architecture Incorporated in Rapid City
Panelist: Dale Lamphere, South Dakota artist laureate, sculptor, owner of Lamphere Studio near Sturgis and founding board member of Arts South Dakota.
Moderator: Patri Acevedo, AIA, CPHC, vice president/present-elect of AIA South Dakota and market leader with JLG Architects in Rapid City.

FIRST FRIDAY REVIEW: SEPTEMBER

Despite the rain earlier in the day, September’s First Friday was a popular place to be. This month, I visited the events at the Washington Pavilion, Rehfeld’s Gallery, Third Eye Gallery at Vishnu, Exposure Gallery, and the Block Party at 8th and Railroad. Talking to the artists at most of the galleries and learning about their work was a treat! The events were all family friendly and worth a trip downtown to see.

~Rachel

“Cracked Open” the Pavilion

Emily Stokes poses next to one of her pieces.

Introduced by Sarah Odens, the Assistant Curator of the VAC, and Jason Folkerts, the Director of the VAC, Emily Stokes appeared to talk about her new exhibition “Cracked Open.” Stokes was very open about her work and life, while telling the crowd her approach to art and her process. Though the gathering only included 18 people, Stokes embraced the intimate atmosphere and opened the floor to questions. She answered inquiries about printmaking, her storytelling, the process she uses and the inspiration for most of her art.

Stokes’ work in the Contemporary Gallery is a compilation of her box and printmaking work that encompasses her style well. The larger pieces on the wall have a simplicity and brightness to them that immediately attracts the eye. The work featured in the gallery is inspired by the differences between small towns and the contrast of living in different places. She explained that this exhibition is somewhat of a new venture for her, and the box concept in some of the pieces came from a desire to change things up a bit.

“I always think of Monet and his haystacks,” Stokes says. “The boxes became a way to kind of unify ideas.”

This exhibition was the first time for Stokes to see her bright work against a dark wall, an experience she excitedly shared with the audience. “It’s taken me awhile to get comfortable with color,” she said.

Her current project is one similar to the boxes, but branches out into more organically shaped creations. She has also been working with screen printing, though her favorite style is still drawing with a ballpoint pen.

As part of First Friday, the Pavilion had a scavenger hunt for children that included pieces in Stokes’ exhibition. Families came in and out of the gallery throughout the talk, producing a lively atmosphere. The unusually shaped pieces and familiar images are a great opportunity to expose kids to art they will understand.

Every side of Stokes’ art has something to it, and the three-dimensional features keep visitors on their toes throughout the exhibit. With the warm colors and farm life images, Stokes has produced a relatable and inspiring exhibition. Director Jason Folkerts said it best: “[She] does a good job of inheriting the Midwest.”

Also at the Pavilion is the “Above the Fold” exhibit with featured origami from nine artists. This exhibit is amazing and has some larger than life pieces that will delight children and adults alike!

Karen Kinder at Rehfeld’s Gallery

Karen Kinder poses next to her favorite animal: sheep.

Walking into Rehfeld’s I was greeted immediately by the new owner, Matt Jorgenson. He was exceptionally polite and helpful in my search for Karen Kinder, the artist of the reception at the gallery that night. The gallery itself was very open and the floor plan well-suited to the foot traffic of a busy First Friday reception. With over 30 artists’ work on display, I was worried I would not be able to identify Kinder’s work. Boy was I wrong! The gallery had set her pieces centrally, and my eyes were drawn immediately to her work.

While walking through the gallery, there was a noticeably different feel from the modern vibe of the Contemporary Gallery at the Pavilion. Rehfeld’s had a warmer and more at-home feel to it. There were children about from the moment I walked in, but much more subdued than the ones at the scavenger hunt. Kinder’s work added to this calmer vibe,  featuring farm and field landscapes with sheep and cattle.

Kinder had many friends and acquaintances visiting with her throughout my time at the gallery. When I finally got a chance to talk to her, the explanations of her work were as warm as the paintings themselves. “Color is just fun!” She said.

Kinder loves color, especially purple, and contrast is extremely important in her work. She also explained that sheep are her favorite animal to paint, though she appreciates the “angularity” of cows as well.

Kinder’s work is well worth a trip to Rehfeld’s, and a great fit for the family or date night. The warmth and farm-grown feel of her oil paintings are inviting and capture the essence of farm life in South Dakota.

Shiny, Happy People at Vishnu Bunny/Third Eye Gallery

Anna Glenski, Morgan Bentley, Hannah Wendt, Dustin Marie, Tyler Breske, Trista White Dove, and The Art of Lemmons were featured in Third Eye Gallery’s latest show. Unfortunately, I did not stay long enough to hear the music from Bodega Sushi and Granola featured that night. The artists put together an amazing array of art in different mediums. The work on display included everything from sculpture to charcoal drawings on newsprint.

The artwork in this gallery presented a different side to modern art that the previous exhibitions influenced by farm life could not achieve. The neons and saturated colors of pop culture icons filled the walls of the galleries, and mixed media pieces with global influence found their place there as well. Though the exhibition was listed as a family event, there were a few pieces present that included nudity or more adult themes that some families might want to avoid.

While many artists presented more abstract concepts, common themes throughout the exhibition were human forms, or parts of them, and pop culture references like Pokémon and the Joker. Along with the many brightly colored pieces, there were quite a few black and white or monochromatic pieces, as well. Some artists had a theme while others simply displayed a selection of their varying works. The variety of work displayed was a refreshing change of pace from the previous galleries I visited, though each gallery had its own charms.

Bonus Feature! Our own Hannah Wendt was featured at this exhibition. She also had work at my next stop–the 5th Annual Tallgrass Recovery Art Show.

Tallgrass 5th Annual Recovery Art Show

The last gallery stop on my First Friday tour was the busiest yet. Held at Exposure Gallery, the Tallgrass Recovery Art Show features the artwork of people who have been affected by addiction. On Facebook the gallery said, “Art is a medium for healing and we’re happy that we can help bring attention to the work that Tallgrass does each year in a small way.”

This show featured paintings, sculptures, and a few found-art style pieces. Most notable in the two room show were the larger-than-life sculpture of a man made of branches, and the fabric draped painted sign. A voting box sat next to the entryway of the gallery, and several visitors stopped to voice their opinion during my time at the show.

Many of the paintings featured words, quotes or the artist’s own thoughts on addiction. Another common motif throughout the show contrasted bright color with black and white or shades of gray. Subjects for the paintings and sculpture ranged from abstract to depictions of people. Though touching is not allowed, many pieces in the show make you want to reach out and feel their different textures and layers. This sort of tactile yearning was a unique experience among the gallery shows that night.

Some of the art in this show may be disturbing to younger audiences, but overall I would consider it family friendly. The pieces came from artists of different age ranges, and the perspectives were as varied as the artists themselves. The pieces in the show draw the audiences in, and simultaneously push them away. This show truly encompasses the different sides of addiction and recovery for an audience who may not have experience with the situation.

I ended the night at the 8th and Railroad Block Party. I didn’t stay long, but it was busy and the music was interesting! The band I heard was a blues group that included a didgeridoo and harmonica in their songs. First Friday was a hit, and there are lots of great new art shows to go see this month. I highly recommend all of the places I stopped at!

ANGELA BEHRENDS: AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW

Meeting Angela was a wonderful experience! I not only enjoyed insight into her work, but made a new friend. I was surprised to discover several pieces of artwork around Sioux Falls, that have left a significant mark on me, are hers. I was delighted to have the chance to chat more in-depth about those subjects with the artist herself.

-Hannah

Before any questions were asked, Angela jumped right into talking about her work. 

In 2012, I had a solo exhibition. My work was right outside that really long gallery–that A Gallery–I got to have that gallery during the “Beauty and The Beast show.” I did kind of a reboot of the piece that was on the wall. It was all these little bags of clear perfect water, and they were kind of jewel-like. It was suppose to be like a power plant, that could conduct energy from one end of the wall to the other. The wall was close to 30 feet long. So, I sent all of the energy down to one end and then it gathered with the copper wires connecting all of those. It gathered in a mirror, and I had crocheted some copper wire and put a bunch of stuff around that mirror so that the energy would gather around these little wires and come into that. We set up the lights so that the round mirror would reflect the spot of light down onto the floor. It was hung at a height where most people could see themselves in it, but they could also see other parts of the show around them.

At the SD Art Museum until 7/23/2017

I really liked that idea, but when the opportunity for the “Women at Work” show came up, I’m like ‘you know, I think it should be an installation piece instead of, you know, just an object.’ And so, I put that one up. I put India ink into some of the water bags. So there are some that are clear and beautiful and the light doesn’t really refract, but it’s bent to shine spots on the wall from when the lights hit it. Some of them got a tint, and some of them didn’t. Some of them got a lot of ink so that they were just super black. All of the black is up here on the top of the installation,  so some of the lighter stuff is down below, and there’s a spot over here that’s the bright clear water. It’s about water quality and us needing to save that resource and pipelines, and fracking and the fail rate.

You’re probably familiar with the feathers and branches in the Washington Pavilion Visual Arts Center. So, that’s one of mine that’s in a collection now. As part of a collaboration with Post Pilgrim and the Sioux Falls Design Center, Jennifer White and I did a Final Friday with the chalkboards. As far as I know, the chalkboards are still up. That night there were people leaning up against the wall, and as soon as they walked away I would be over there with the chalk fixing it. I guess I’m just a little bit of a freak that way.

A few steps down the street from the Sioux Falls Design Center is the Shriver’s window. You don’t have to go inside the building to see it, it’s just the corner display window at 11th and Phillips. I’ve got that 18 foot raw canvas laying on the floor. I had that thing along with me from when I went on the camping trip that produced the “sold” pictures on the boards. It was a site in the South Jenny Lake in the shadow of the national park. I rolled the canvas out on my camp site, and I brought a little bit of tobacco. I had worked with tobacco before as a staining drying material, so  that ended up being the brown color. I made some bison on the canvas. Then I needed charcoal, so I kind of fished some stuff out of my camp fire.  Along with that installation, I had made these tripods out of branches. They were meant to hold the canvas up. When I went to install the thing, I had some engineering issues and it didn’t work. Now, they are kind of a backdrop, or forest to that installation. So you walk up to the window, and you look down to see the piece.

Piece at Shriver’s Square

I did a Final Friday that was in conjunction with the PechaKucha. You get 20 images and you get 20 seconds per image. You are presenting whatever ideas, artwork, whatever it is that you do and that you’re passionate about. You share that, and then it goes up on a website. I haven’t had the guts to go listen to mine. I was so busy with Jennifer getting the “Love or Money” show together that I didn’t spend a lot of time preparing the PechaKucha. Anyway, it’s out there on the Net for everybody to see!

(See her presentation at Pechakucha Sioux Falls, Vol. 22 )

Angela working on Love or Money show at the Post Pilgrim Gallery

MAST (Madison Area Stands Together) is a local group that formed after the presidential election last year. There was a lot of concern about the travel bans, and the Visa issues. I work at Dakota State University, and we’ve got a lot of international students and faculty members, too, who are from all over the world, and they’re suddenly not able to move about and come and do their jobs. Everything was all kind of scary. So, we held a candle light vigil for them, just to let them know that we care and are concerned, too. This group developed out of that sense of helplessness. It recently came up that they need to have a logo.  So, I don’t know if this [see below] is going to be their final design, but I proposed it and people seem to be fairly excited about it. It was important that there was this sturdy something. I wanted that awareness with the eyes and everything. Then also, the horns are not being used, but they could be, you know. It’s like this defensible possibility.  And black and white is pretty powerful.

You just answered several of my questions there before I could even get to them. I like it–this should be a great time! Are you from Madison? 

I’m from southwestern Minnesota. I got out of there as quickly as I possibly could. I went to college in central Minnesota, and then I went to the Twin Cities, and kind of bounced all over the place there. I was a little too distracted, so I went back to UMM–University of Minnesota, Morris–to finish college and I floundered around for another number of years, then I went to graduate school in Lincoln, Nebraska. After that I moved to Vancouver, Washington for 7 or 8 years, and then I moved to South Dakota.

So, was your degree centered around your artwork? 

Yes, my masters degree is in sculpture. My undergraduate work was a duel emphasis in sculpture and printmaking. I tried to continue with printmaking in graduate school, but it didn’t work out very well. I had a studio that I loved, but it was in this dumpy old building that they were going to tear down. But it was a good quarter mile from the print studios, so that was kind of tough to get stuff back and forth, and I didn’t have any storage space in the print area. I mean, for graduate students, you just kind of carve out your space. You know, it’s all self directed, and I was busy enough with sculpture.

So then, how long have you been in South Dakota? 

2009. So, it’s close to eight and a half years. I’ve been at Dakota State University for eight years, and I started out there with one 3-D Design class, but that wasn’t enough to pay my rent. So, I taught ESL for one semester.

Was at the Sioux Falls Design Center, from artists’ travel snapshots with “SOLD” banner

Cool! You’ve been here for a while then.  You have your artwork and teach, too? 

Yes. I am employed full-time as a lecturer of art at Dakota State University in the digital and arts design department. During the summers, I haven’t done it for a couple of years, but this year I’m working as a part-time naturalist at Lake Herman State Park in Walkers Point Recreational Area. It’s kinda cool. I get the opportunity to come into contact with lots of different  kinds of people. You know, especially with the DSU stuff with students, and faculty, and community. I always try to get my students to focus on something that’s outside of the classroom. It’s not just about earning a grade; I mean it’s important stuff, this visual communication. We’ve got so much screen time and everything. I make them do everything analog. They have to cut paper, they have to tear things and make collages.

I’m not too great with technology, so that style is perfect for how my mind works. 

Well, I kind of call myself a dinosaur. I have sort of actively resisted–I mean I do the things I’m supposed to do for my job. I just think [technology] is another medium you can work in. Illustrator, Photoshop and InDesign; these are digital tools you can use, but you still need to have those basic design skills to make something descent. The MAST design that I made is cut paper. I started with drawing it on paper, and then cutting it out with an exact-o knife. Then I printed out the text that I wanted to have on there. I’m perfectly happy with designing the font, or the typeface, I should say. You have to have a sense of composition. You have to be able to make things communicate what they need to communicate. The digital image manipulation is not the end all of design skills. Yeah, I’m a dinosaur.

Magpie

You’ve already mentioned different inspirations that you have, do you have more that influence you? 

I think it’s vitally important that people connect with nature, and that has been so lacking. It’s like there’s this spiritual deficit, I think; maybe even like a sink hole. We get enough racing around, driving around looking at screens, typing things, you know. If you’re taking notes on a computer, you’re not making the same neural connections you would if you are writing with a pencil on paper, or drawing. You know, you have to have this physical connection with the stuff that you’re learning. It’s not as effective to just type things, and look at it on a screen. So, yes, there’s all this technology that we deal with, it is wonderful. There are things that give lots more efficiency, but do we really keep moving at that pace? It’s making everybody sick. Everybody’s not getting enough movement, enough exercise. It drives me crazy, and I’m in the middle of it, too. When I make something, installation work especially, when I make work I’m really careful about the path of the energy, and the path of the people in that energy. I work my ass off when I have the opportunity to put something up. Humility also has a place here. I’m always unsure about it, but I work as good as I can so that I can offer it as a gift to the people that go and see it. When I say I’ve got this show up and I want you to go see it, that’s like me with a little gift with a bow on it offering this experience, because I want to give that. I think it will do something, it will help somebody, or make them feel a certain way, or give them a moment of peace, or something like that. So, that’s my gift. I realize a lot of times when I’m saying, ‘go see the show’, and doing all that self promotion, it’s not self promotion to make a career for me. It’s that there’s a gift that I want to offer that’s not going to get unwrapped if you don’t go and see it.

Monotype prints “Cents”
“Walk Softly” presented in Love or Money show at the Post Pilgrim Gallery

Yeah, I like that point…where it’s just two-dimensional, and people just looking at something. I think sometimes people need that three-dimensional installation that’s actually intruding into their space. It’s very important, I agree.

So, it’s more experiential than something you would just look at. I think installation, and sculpture–three-dimensional stuff–has an easier inlet. There’s a lot of paintings out there, but there’s probably not a lot of paintings that will really pull you in and offer you the kind of physical, or emotional, experience that an environment can. That said, I’m not trying to make judgments on things that I don’t respond to.

Now, how can people contact you? Do you have a website?

Facebook is just fine. My profile picture is me kissing a fake bison. I do have a blog site. I call it an images only blog site, but I haven’t done a really good job of keeping up with stuff on that. So, most of the stuff is older. That is a place where they could go and see things.

www.angelabehrends.blogspot.com

“Land” 6′ 10″ made with artists’ hair

Can you describe your work, art and everything else, along with who you are in three words, or I should say, in three “sections”? 

Art, nature, joy. Those are the things that I seek, and seek to share. I want to add something for people who are stopping themselves because “I can’t draw, I can’t do this, or I can’t do that.” It’s really, really, really important for your heart and soul to just make stuff, and experience stuff. You know, get away from your computer for a little while, and connect with people and connect with nature. Really, really, really important. That’ll make us happier, and it’ll make the world a better place…make it easier to live in.

CFA: Voyage FCU Gallery

Voyage Federal Credit Union at Dawley Farms is searching for the next artist to fill their new gallery walls. The art has to be appropriate for a corporate setting, but various mediums are welcome (paintings, photography, sculptures, drawing, etc). The gallery is very open, and can easily handle 15-20 large pieces upwards of 6X6 or dozens of smaller pieces. They would love to check out your art, have you check out the space, have a combined show with another artist, or do a transfer show.

Contact Molly Brown at mollyb@voyagefcu.org or text 605-413-0096.

      

 

Art Maze II

A broad-shouldered man’s silhouette uses a screwdriver to open a sewing machine, presenting for his minor audience the inner mechanical workings before a curtain closes as swifty as it opened.

Stark, black coated walls light up with neon splatter paintings, changing perceptions with a flicker of lights.

A 22-year old man wanders through a hallway covered in flashing, colored lights endlessly reflected by tinfoil covered walls.

This, is Art Maze II.

Last weekend, Sioux Falls artists gathered at Exposure Gallery & Studios to present a two-floor interactive series of installations, portraits, and paintings.

Roughly 40 local artists worked in collaboration to fill every hallway, studio and corner with creations, produced using graffiti, charcoal, photography, duct tape, performance art, and everything in between…

via SDPB. To view more, click here.

CFA: MAKE IT CLICK SIDEWALK ART CAMPAIGN

  • Emergency Medical Services for Children is looking for artists to participate in a sidewalk chalk art competition to raise awareness for the importance of seat belt use. Nine artists will be selected via email submission. This campaign is scheduled to work in tandem with Downtown Riverfest and the public will be invited to vote for their favorite work on Saturday, August 19 from 4:30 – 6:30 p.m.  For more information, click here.
  • Deadline July 31 2017