Category Archives: #siouxfallsartists

CALL FOR ART INSTRUCTORS

About JAM Art and Supplies

Our Mission
To get affordable art and craft supplies into the hands of people who will use them, create an online community for local artists, and be a source of art information for Sioux Falls.
(A 501(c)3 non-profit since 2014.)

Like a thrift store, we take in donated, barely used supplies on a daily basis and resell them at a low price, making creating affordable for all. It’s a second chance for unused materials and keeps them out of landfills! We offer a range of learning opportunities. From Business Basics for Artists for adults to Creative Reuse Camps for kids, we are passionate about fostering art appreciation and developing creative thinking skills.

Job Description

JAM is currently seeking lead and assistant instructors in Visual Arts for our summer camp programming. Under supervision of JAM Executive Director, the summer camp instructors perform a variety of duties in coordinating and instructing art classes, camp activities, and supervision of children. Lesson plans are provided, with some leeway for creative improvisation.

Creative Reuse Summer Camp lead and assistant instructor positions are part time and classified as an independent contractor with no benefits entitled. Seeking one lead instructor and one assistant for multiple or all camp sessions. 9:00 to 4:00, Monday through Thursday, plus Thursday evening camper’s artist reception. Sessions dates:

JUNE 4-7 (ages 8-12)
JUNE 11-14 (ages 8-12)
JULY 16-19 (ages 8-12)
JULY 23-26 (ages 13-16)
AUGUST 6-9 (ages 8-12)
AUGUST 13-16 (ages 8-12)

One day campers will walk to the art studio of local creative reuse artist Steve Bormes. This walk is a couple blocks from JAM. Other projects will include art, games, and learning about creative uses for unusual materials. A collaborative art installation will be built each week, and will be displayed with a week-ending an art show on Thursday evening for friends and family.

Responsibilities Include

  • Implementing creative reuse art projects for campers ages 8 through 16 years old.
  • Supervising groups of children and facilitating activities, and lunch breaks throughout the day.
  • Walking campers to and from a local artist’s studio, making sure to create a safe environment not only when walking, but also while at the studio. Being alert and present at all times.
  • Strong technical skills in a variety of artistic mediums.
  • Initiative, self-direction and ability to be flexible and adapt to changes.
  • Great interpersonal and public speaking skills. Instructors should be engaging and patient in a classroom environment as you act as the face of JAM Art and Supplies.
  • Attending art reception at week’s end, and giving a short welcome/overview/commentary for guests.

Key Qualifications

  • Ideal candidate is a current art educator or practicing artist/creative.
  • Teaching, camp, or child care experience.
  • Ability to instruct a wide variety of techniques and ages.

Other skills and Abilities

This position requires physical effort. Frequent lifting of up to twenty-five pounds. Some bending, stooping and/or lifting will be required.

For full consideration, candidates must send the following in one complete document:

  • Cover Letter addressing their skills as they fit the job
  • Resume

Application

To apply for this position, please send the required materials to:

Jess Miller | Executive Director
jamartandsupplies@gmail.com

Please indicate your last name and “Summer Camp Lead Instructor Position” or “Summer Camp Assistant Instructor Position” in the subject line of the email. No phone calls, please. We will respond to those candidates whose qualifications are best aligned with the posted job description.

Requirements:
Chosen candidates will be required to provide proof of licenses, certifications, and education required for this position, and undergo a background check.

Hours: 30/camp week up to 180 hours total

Pay: Starting at $250/week

 

Intensive Painting Workshop Opportunity

2-WEEKEND INTENSIVE
5 FULL DAYS–30 HOURS OF INSTRUCTION! 
Dates: JANUARY 19-21 & 26-28
$550 + tax
Once-a-year opportunity!  This year’s winter still life painting workshop has been augmented to add an additional weekend of instruction, allowing more time for an immersive experience and practical application of creating a still life from start to finish.  
In this 2-weekend workshop, with over 30 hours of instruction, students will be guided through a step-by-step approach for designing and painting a still life–from initial setup and compostion, to block-in and final rendering.  The advantage of two weekends provides students additional hands-on experience into the final rendering process that cannot be covered in just one weekend, allowing time to explore ‘indirect’ (i.e. layered) painting techniques such as glazing and scumbling that are often employed as ‘finishing’ layers.  Instruction will be centered around balancing the elements of design, observational & conceptual understanding of form, as well as learning to render volume with tone, color, and paint application. Lectures will discuss materials, composition & design, color palette and color theory.  
Class Limit 10.  Designed for all skill levels.  Schedule consists of Friday evening demonstrations, followed by two full days of student work with personalized, one-on-one instruction.  A list of suggested materials will be provided with registration.

WORKSHOP SCHEDULE
FRIDAY 6pm – 9pm
Instructor demonstration & lecture
SATURDAY 9:30am – 4:30pm
Student work day separated into morning & afternoon sessions with an hour lunch break.  Individual instruction and demonstration throughout the day.
SUNDAY: 9:30am – 4:30pm
Student work day separated into morning & afternoon sessions with a break for lunch.  Individual instruction and demonstration throughout the day. 
 
Limit 10 students. 50% non-refundable down-payment due to hold place.
Contact Anna for more information or to REGISTER
 
 
PAYMENT & REGISTRATION
Tuition payable by cash, check or credit card (via Paypal).  50% down-payment is required to hold a spot.  
 

​Checks payable to Anna Youngers Fine Art.

To REGISTER, or for additional information, contact:
anna@annayoungers.com or (605) 929-5016

Sculptor Seeks to Restore Bronze Sculptures

Local sculpture artist, Darwin Wolf seeks to expand the preservation and restoration arm of his business, Wolf Bronze. If anyone within 300 miles of Sioux Falls sees a green sculpture that isn’t supposed to be green, contact Darwin. Get the word out!

See his work or contact him on his artist Facebook page Darwin Wolf, Sculptor.

Summer shower before waxing away the green.
Getting to work on Abe Lincoln at Sioux Falls’ Scheels during their reno. He has never looked this rough since!
Flat horizontal surfaces are the worst, but we restored this to new condition and the green never came back.

Simple: before and after the salts of winter get splashed on Abe’s boots at Sioux Falls Scheels.

10 BEST BLOG POSTS OF 2017

Man, is it just us or was 2017 on supersonic speed? As you may or may not know, one of our big goals here at JAM is to be a source of art information for the Sioux Falls community through our website and blog. We have published over 160 posts in the last year on topics ranging from local art events to local artists and art educators, and everything in between.

Didn’t get a chance to read them all? We got you. Here is our top 10 hit list of our most popular posts to help you ring in 2018.

[Psssst.  Want a backstage pass to the local art scene? Join our team! We are always looking for dedicated and reliable bloggers and photographers. We have internship opportunities, too. Holler at us!!]

JAM’S 2017 TOP 10

10. “RELEASE THE CRANES” AT THE WASHINGTON PAVILION

9. FIRST FRIDAY REVIEW: SEPTEMBER

8. AUGUSTANA STUDENT INVITATIONAL

7. ELEMENTS AND OTHER APRIL REVIEWS

6. ANGIE GILLESPIE: AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW

5. FIRST FRIDAY REVIEW: FEBRUARY

4. ANGELA BEHRENDS: AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW

3. GENEVA COSTA: AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW

2. ERIN NGUYEN: ART EDUCATOR

1. AMBER HANSEN: ART EDUCATOR

From all of us at JAM, Happy New Year!

CFA: The 2018 Arts Night Experience

Saturday, April 28, 2018
Mary W. Sommervold Hall
April 28th will be a night to celebrate art in our community. The 57th Annual Arts Night Experience will have a new look and taste. View selected art in the exhibition, Ripple Effect: Arts Night 2018, January 27 – April 22, 2018 in the Everist Gallery.

‘RIPPLE EFFECT’ EXHIBITION SUBMISSION FORM

‘THE WALL’ SUBMISSION FORM

The WALL is a series of small artworks hung on a single wall in the exhibition Ripple Effect: Arts Night 2018. Following the exhibition, the artworks will be displayed at The 2018 Arts Night Experience auction and gala on Saturday, April 28, where they will be sold as part of an online silent auction.

MAKE ART YOUR BUSINESS

Wish you could just make art for a living? Got the art part down, just not business savvy? We have the perfect opportunity for you. Our Business Class for Artists is guaranteed to get you rolling.

Acquire the knowledge you need in this 4-week, 2-hour class tailored specifically for artists who want to get serious about their art career. Taught by expert and coach Claudia Dail, with special guest appearances by other local experts, you will learn pivotal ways to focus your skills, find your niche, and market yourself. Learn alongside a group of your peers within a supportive, open setting. You’ll be sure to gain lasting relationships.

Quite a few local success stories have sprouted from this unique opportunity. Watch for those stories in the weeks to come. In the meantime, get registered!  Only $85 for all four sessions. Deadline to register is Monday, January 8. Space is limited.

REGISTER HERE

DAVID SIEH: AN INSPIRED INTERVIEW

Talking with David Sieh in his gallery at the 8th and Railroad Center was a great experience. I learned a lot about what it means to be a contemporary naturalist, and how David approaches his work. Though a small space, Se Gallery was a brightly lit workspace with a lot going on. Getting a glimpse into his artistic process and journey as an artist was a treat.
-Rachel

Rachel: Can you tell me a little bit about yourself as an artist and your preferred medium to work with?

David: Sure. I guess, like we were talking about before, I grew up in the Twin Cities area and then moved here. So my art evolved from nature, landscape and wildlife. Then I was exposed to more contemporary, abstract art, then very influenced by the New York school of artists, all the abstract expressionists and then into pop-art. So my art kind of combines all of that.

About me, I grew up in nature, surrounded by nature and I always had a love of art, to use color and design. Stuff with that really developed my interest in art and I schooled in art so I just continued down that path I guess.

David got his Bachelor of Sciences degree with an emphasis in art from the University of Sioux Falls after bouncing to Augustana and Vermillion for a while. He’s been making art for 30 plus years. He’s been in his current gallery space for over 5 years.

You write that exposure to Terry Redlin’s work drove you to a career in art. What about him and his work inspired you to start making art?

When I was in high school, Terry Redlin was living in Hastings, Minnesota. He was one of the first people to inspire me as far as having a career in art. I actually did go over to his house–his home studio–when he was very first promoting his work. He inspired me in that a person could do the art and make a living. I was very much into nature and environmental art at that time, and I still am. Even though my work doesn’t emulate his work or really show any influence of him, his career path influenced me.

You call yourself a contemporary naturalist painter. What does that mean to you personally and how does it affect your work as an artist?

I’m very inspired by nature, that’s where I recharge my batteries. I have to be alone in nature. I try to do a little bit everyday, even if it’s just walking down the sidewalk or just in the backyard; to kind of get in-tune, get in a rhythm with nature, so as a naturalist I learn from nature. Just seeing how complicated things are…color patterns, designs, all that stuff influences my aesthetic. As a contemporary naturalist, I express that in my own painting through my gestures, colors, compositions. So, my work comes off as non-representational a lot of the time, but still influenced by nature.

You started drawing and painting when you were young “as a form of communication.” How does art communicate to you and how do you see yourself communicating through art to others?

On the representation level it’s a relatively cut and dry conversation where people just see me representing nature or an image. Then I can also combine those images with other aspects so it changes the dialogue to where it makes things a little more complicated. People have to think about the relationship of two images side by side, often times in a conservation aspect where it makes you think about the fragile-ness of nature, also the complexities of nature. Then, if you were to look at the abstract art, it doesn’t necessarily have a dialogue about nature. Its dialogue is more of an emotional impact where hopefully people look at it and have an emotional, maybe even a physical reaction to it. You know, that guttural reaction where you really like something or you really don’t, and then you stop and think about why you do or don’t like it.

Do you feel like you have a responsibility through your art to communicate those things or feel as though you have a responsibility as an artist?

I definitely do. I feel that I have the ability, or talent or sometimes I even feel like I’m a medium. I don’t even know exactly where the work comes from or what the work is, I’m just the medium putting the work down. So yes, I feel that I do have a responsibility to create as much art as I physically can just to get those conversations rolling.

As a part of the Sioux Falls art community, what do you think of the art scene?

There’s a real good talent pool here in town, a lot of people interested in it, but as far as a collector base and as far as general public knowledge it’s really minimal. But it seems to grow a bit all the time.

David’s list of in-town favorite shows include the past “Artists Against Hunger” shows and the Washington Pavilion’s Arts Night. He recommends Exposure, Post Pilgrim, Rehfeld’s and Piper. His work can currently be found at Piper and his studio at 8th and Railroad. He has also done murals at the Great Plains Zoo and Delbridge Museum.

How often do you create new work? And how long does a piece usually take you to finish?

As you can see, I’ve got work that’s in different stages of finish. I paint every single day. I’m in the process constantly. I’m never out of the process.

I’m gonna go with the usual 50 years and 10 minutes. It’s years and years of developing your technique and style.

Do you have any future plans for shows or specific pieces of art?

For me the art career and the whole thing is a combination of steady and consistent and patience. I’ve been doing this for 30+ years, so for me it’s the long term game.

David does accept commissions, seeing them as “Totally relevant and necessary, and part of the process.”

Follow his work through his Facebook page.

Photo Tour: Ka-Chunk

On Friday, November 10, we had the opportunity to attend a local, one-of-a-kind vending machine art show at Ipso Gallery called “Ka-Chunk.” Both the prizes, as well as the machines were created by an assemblage of 30+ local artists. The engineer of Steve Bormes‘ dispenser even made the effort to create a wheelchair-friendly push button, a refreshing consideration! So impressed.

Tokens sold out not quite an hour into the evening. Prepared for the demand, the gallery had a collection of Fresh Produce limited edition swag to keep the vending going. It was a packed house from start to finish, and plenty for people of all ages. Here’s a little photo tour of the creative machines and prizes artists came up with for the night! 

FIRST FRIDAY REVIEW: NOVEMBER

This month I stopped by shows at Eastbank, Rug & Relic, and the Washington Pavilion. No new shows at the Pavilion this month, but all of the great activities for kids still happened. There were so many artists talking about their work at Eastbank, I spent most of my time there. The variety of work made fewer stops on my route doable, but I highly recommend stopping by some other locations as well. The Museum of Visual Materials and Rehfeld’s were two stops I had on my list. See more art shows on the Sioux Falls Arts Council webpage.            -Rachel

RUG & RELIC

This First Friday, Rug & Relic hosted a one-night-only feature show of over 150 pieces from Chris Vance. Vance’s work plays on familiar cartoon-like styles and bright colors to bring his work to life. Pieces like “Peanut Butter” take a more abstract turn, but use the same colors and curvy lines as his other styles. Other work on display at Rug & Relic included light sculptures from Steve Bormes, and paintings from other area artists.

EASTBANK

The first artist talk of the evening came from John Kolb. His art style is influenced heavily by his Christian roots. Kolb joked that the goal of one of the pieces on display was to see how many different ways he could do a cross. His pieces focus on shapes in a more abstract approach. He feels that sometimes he gets “locked into” greens and blues occasionally. Using a layering technique with his colors, Kolb’s pieces can get up to 5 coats of paint. He has around 5 pieces on display at Eastbank .

Linda Ackland-Kolb gave the second talk of the night, presenting and describing her pastel-painted beeswax works of art. Her pieces, though small, take a lot of work to get right. She fielded questions about the framing process as well, which is delicate since she does not use sealant to set her pieces. The work on display at Eastbank is a series of vessels and some fashion inspired pieces. Linda plans to branch into more clothing inspired pieces next.

Warren Arends ventured from on-canvas art into stonework and jewelery. His work started as a hobby, but now Arends has two students in soldering. He turns colorful stones from all different countries and continents into pendants and rings. His business, Arends Agates, custom makes every piece for individual requests.

Scott Chleborad was another featured artist at Eastbank. His work combines painting and photography that results in often psychedelic landscapes. Chleborad’s talk was short and to the point, with a few anecdotes about his process. His work with light and contrast makes his work unique and beautiful.

All of the artists’ work at Eastbank is worth a trip to 8th and Railroad to see. More than just these four artists have work on display, and the work they brought is just as exciting. Next First Friday, Eastbank will be doing a “postcard sale” of local art, so be sure to check out the current work on display before then.

 

WEAVING A COMMUNITY THROUGH CREATIVE USE

Weaving is recognized as one of the oldest crafts, dating as far back as 6000 BC. Beginning as a product of necessity, weaving looms were used to create clothing, bedding, and other textiles of a protective nature. This applied art developed into a means of expression, tapestries woven for posterity, for pleasure, for interaction.

When I began weaving four years ago, I had no idea what I was doing. I had been intrigued by the craft, and was looking to experiment in a new medium. My journey began when we tore down the half pipe skate ramp in my backyard. Using a four foot scrap of weathered plywood and about 200 nails, I had built myself a machine! Yes, it was warped, full of splinters and even kind of smelly, but it was mine. The design of the loom has not overcomplicated itself, and I was intrigued to use a method that had been utilized throughout time, and all over the globe.

After creating a few weaves, I began to learn, to understand. I adapted my design, and with the help of my father, built a new, improved frame loom. Something with an adjustable stand, something… easy to transport. Through trial and error, I have developed several variations of a standing loom since then, with designs for myself, Hawthorne Elementary, and for JAM Art and Supplies.

Art Teacher Lisa Brunick with her loom at Hawthorne Elementary

Two years ago, we began bringing the JAM loom with us to our booth at summer festivals. We attended events throughout the Sioux Empire, such as: the 605 Summer Classic, Jazzfest, the Farmer’s Market, That Sounds Decent, as well as the Sidewalk Arts Festival. Bringing this loom provided us a way to interact with the crowd, an icebreaker as well as a means to sharing our Creative Reuse mission with young and old alike.

Weaving is a popular means of community building across the country. Using a shared loom is a means of creating your own image and story. The viewer is provided with an actualized representation of problem solving, threads and materials interacting in a self-sustained chaos. Our community weaves represent Sioux Falls, and each participant that helped create the piece.

Each weave that was created was made from donated material, and gave purpose to some otherwise overlooked materials. Our weaves contain everything from yarn, fabric scraps, fake flowers, men’s neckwear, to old sweaters and jewelry. To date, JAM has created 11 large-scale weaves in the past two years, all made from the helping hands of our community. There is pride in production, and we are just beaming.

Please, join JAM on November 9th at Remedy Brewing Company for an all-ages get-together and fundraiser. Drink fine local craft beer, listen to live music, learn how to weave, and take a chance or 5 or 10 at winning one of our beautiful, community-crafted weavings!

Raffle Tickets are $10 each or 3 for $20.

You can pre-purchase raffle tickets at JAM anytime before the event, but make sure you join us the night of because we’re giving away a JAM VIP Membership, and you must be present to win. JAM VIP Memberships are a $250 value that includes one complimentary in-house event, a tshirt, bumper sticker, and 25% off every purchase made in our store!