Category Archives: Blog

5 things Jess wants you to know about our Fabric Swap

Did you know JAM gets new art and craft supply donations every day? I have said many times, “everyone has a donation.” But I didn’t actually realize that donations would be pouring in our doors faster than we can put them away. Which brings me to the first thing I wanted you to know:

1.  Lately, fabric has been stacking up. That is why we’re having a fabric swap.

2. The goal for us is to entice you with getting rid of fabric you have never used in return for new fabric for your next projects. But actually, what we’d really like is for you to fill up a bag of fabric in exchange for $10. That way you don’t actually have to part with any of your coveted fabric stash.

3. There is a lot of quilting fabric. I have fabric on almost every free surface in the store. Some of this is holiday, and we’ll be putting that away until the right season rolls around. In addition to our seasonal fabric, if you don’t take this fabric home we’ll have to put most of this fabric into our warehouse. Which is sad, don’t make me do that.

4. This is happening starting today, Thursday, May 14 through next week Tuesday. After Tuesday our normal price on fabric will continue. Did you know that normally our fabric is priced by you? We’re the only store in town that allows customers to truly name their price for a product.

5. I’m not sure when this will be happening again. If this goes well, it’s something we could do quarterly, or more. To ensure this is successful for all of us, please let at least one person know about this who could benefit from getting some cheap fabric. Close your eyes and imagine the joy that person will receive from you telling them about all of the patterns and colors here at JAM’s Fabric Swap; share this post with the share buttons above or below.

See you soon! Don’t forget, we’re closed Mondays!JAM-Profile-Signature_Jess

Skullmore: A New Zine In Town!

zine

/zēn/ – noun (informal); a magazine, especially a fanzine

One of the five different Skullmore covers. Artwork by Zach DeBoer
One of the five different Skullmore covers. Artwork by Zach DeBoer

A zine is similar to a magazine, but usually smaller in size and publication, and of the DIY variety. Tomorrow night is the release of a new zine, Skullmore, which is catered towards the creatives of South Dakota.   Skullmore is a collection of art, poetry, music, short stories and feature articles on galleries and businesses that support the arts community. The zine will feature full-color artwork and full-color covers, setting it apart from the traditional straight-from-the-copier zines. The five different covers feature the work of [from L-R in the picture below] Mercedes Nelson, Zach DeBoer, Marc Wagner, Lindy Wise, and Sharon Wagner-Larson.

Skullmore Covers featuring the work of local artists
Skullmore Covers featuring the work of local artists

Exposure Gallery and Studios will host a launch party for the zine in their back gallery from 6-9PM, which will exhibit original works featured in the first issue. This publication is thoughtful, cohesive, and FREE! Combined with the free beer that Exposure offers at their First Friday show, this could be a pretty cheap date for all your romantics out there.

The zine accepts all submissions related to the arts, and is curated by several individuals within the Skullmore family. For questions or content submissions, please contact them at mtskullmorepress@gmail.com.

Images taken from the Skullmore Facebook page.

JAM-Profile-Signature_Amy

Mr. Caraway and Mr. Carlson Go to Vishnu Bunny

Every artist has their peculiar obsessions. Some keep them hidden, preferring to let them lurk at the margins of their work. Others, like Kevin Caraway and Solomon Carson, place them front and center and render them in big, bold, strokes.

Thus, it is only fitting that Caraway and Carson will be exhibiting together this Friday at Vishnu Bunny, as part of the monthly First Fridays series. With a title like 1 + 1 =!?, one must be intrigued. Continue reading Mr. Caraway and Mr. Carlson Go to Vishnu Bunny

Prairie Star Gallery

As an artist, relationships with galleries, patrons, collectors, and the many other varieties of art enthusiasts become just as important, if not more so, than the created work itself. Creating art and showing it in a gallery space is not, in the least, simply about making money. Exhibiting works of art creates communication with the world outside of the studio. The artist and the gallerist share a certain level of involvement and appreciation with the art. –Jordan Thornton

A few weeks ago, I bought a stunning pair of turquoise earrings. The compliments have flowed every time I’ve worn them. When asked where I found them, I had the pleasure of steering each fashion frenzied female far away from the mall and straight to Prairie Star Gallery, a locally owned and operated Native American art gallery in Downtown Sioux Falls. These beautiful stones were turned into jewelry by one of the many talented artists represented by this local business. Continue reading Prairie Star Gallery

Blue Is The Warmest Color: The Art of Hilaire Hiler

While some artists (Picasso, Pollock and Warhol) loom larger than life in our cultural memory, it is only a precious few whose names are actually preserved for posterity. This is why, every once in awhile, one should look back at those artists who were lost to history and bring their unique, if limited achievements to light.

Hilaire Hiler is one of the Continue reading Blue Is The Warmest Color: The Art of Hilaire Hiler

Exposure Gallery and Studios

As an artist, relationships with galleries, patrons, collectors, and the many other varieties of art enthusiasts become just as important, if not more so, than the created work itself. Creating art and showing it in a gallery space is not, in the least, simply about making money. Exhibiting works of art creates communication with the world outside of the studio. The artist and the gallerist share a certain level of involvement and appreciation with the art. -JAM blogger Jordan Thornton
exposure-gallery-and-studio-sioux-falls
Last week, I found myself once again wandering through and autumn colored downtown Sioux Falls on my way to our most recent gallery interview: Exposure Gallery & Studios. Newly relocated at 401 N Phillips Ave in Sioux Falls, which, as my overly smartphone dependent self came to find, is a few blocks closer to The Falls than Google will lead you to believe. Zach DeBoer took time out of a Thursday afternoon to patiently wait on my very lost self, open the doors of his gallery, and to share the thought and ambition behind Exposure.
Zach: “The point of Exposure was to give exposure to artists and to people who wanted to make art and show art and be a part of a community… The main goal of the gallery, as opposed to other galleries, is to be a professional, contemporary gallery that focuses on giving a spotlight to those who maybe aren’t getting it.”

Continue reading Exposure Gallery and Studios

Art and Electioneering: A Short History of Campaign Posters

In the United States, art and politics have long been uneasy bedfellows. This has largely been true since  the onset of the Cold War, which effectively silenced many artists who had been weaned on the radical, leftist ideologies that had prevailed among the American avant-garde during the Twenties and Thirties.

Today, the trend has reversed itself somewhat.  On the whole, however, art remains more an instrument of personal expression (or simply “art for art’s sake”) than a means for making big political statements.

But even if artists try to stay away from politics, politics is by no means devoid of art. One can see this every election year, when Americans are inundated with paraphernalia from various political campaigns: posters, flyers, buttons bumper stickers, etc. Among these, posters tend to be the most interesting and the most likely to yield iconic cultural images.

So, in honor of election day 2014, let’s take look back at the history of the too-often neglected art of the campaign poster.

The first American president to use campaign posters to great effect was John Quincy Adams, who won the hotly contested election of 1824. They began to take on more interesting forms, however, during the presidential election of 1840, which saw the coming out party of Whig Party candidate and Indian Wars veteran William Henry Harrison.

Running under the slogan “Tippecanoe and Tyler Too”, Harrison styled himself as a bona fide Continue reading Art and Electioneering: A Short History of Campaign Posters

Kimble Bromley’s Art of Hypnosis

Picasso famously said that “Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.”

Kimble Bromley believes he has found one potential solution: hypnosis.

DSC_0101

Last Saturday, Bromley, whose series Moby Dick is currently on display at the Washington Pavilion, conducted a hypnosis workshop intended to unleash the inner child-artist of all those in attendance, including this writer.

Each participant was asked to Continue reading Kimble Bromley’s Art of Hypnosis

Making Sense Of It All: The Museum Of Visual Materials

As an artist, relationships with galleries, patrons, collectors, and the many other varieties of art enthusiasts become just as important, if not more so, than the created work itself. Creating art and showing it in a gallery space is not, in the least, simply about making money. Exhibiting works of art creates communication with the world outside of the studio. The artist and the gallerist share a certain level of involvement and appreciation with the art. –JAM blogger Jordan Thornton

Downtown Sioux Falls is rich with beautiful, historic architecture. One of the oldest buildings there is home to a non-profit by the name of The Museum of Visual Materials. A few days ago, I had the pleasure of interviewing Anna at the MoVM. Our morning was filled with hot coffee, a tour of the museum, and a conversation that shed light on the vision behind the museum.

The first question I had for Anna was not one that required much research, but ended up providing the majority of the information I was seeking to learn about the museum.

JAM: “Why is it called The Museum of Visual Materials?”

Anna: “The founder of the museum, Dr. Rose Faithe, named the museum after her uncle Dr. Mathew Faithe’s truck. He had labeled it the “Museum of Visual Materials” and drove around town showing the community the items he had collected throughout his many travels. She also wanted a place where the five senses could be explored.”

We then delved into the where and how of discovering the five senses throughout the museum.

museum-of-visual-materials-sioux-falls-artists-jam-art

Sight: The art gallery, the reason I had emailed Anna in the first place. The museum alternates artists every two months. Those interested in displaying their work Continue reading Making Sense Of It All: The Museum Of Visual Materials

ANDRES TORRES: AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW

Andres-Torres_FeaturedSometimes understanding what you don’t know can be one of the most beneficial truths to attach bearance. By acknowledging that void, there is an internal release provided, a demand for discovery and intuitive action. For Andres Torres, that visceral approach is matched with strong intellect and an explorative understanding of art theory. His abstract paintings have a captivating allure that provide interest for a multi-faceted audience, which he creates through finding an articulate intersection between playful and purpose.

JAM had the pleasure of talking with Andres before he moved to Wisconsin for graduate school. It feels so much longer than two months ago, when we were sitting outside in mid-August, enjoying iced tea and Torres’ thoughts. I have always enjoyed his company and valued his opinion, and his absence has not gone unnoticed. During these fleeting days of fall, take this time to read on, and reminisce on the warmth of summer, and the flowing thoughts of a genuine soul. ~Amy

paintings-on-the-floor-torres

What is the path that has led you to where you are today?

Well, I’d have to say that my mom was a huge part of me becoming an artist, along with my grandmother. I’ve always been exposed to Continue reading ANDRES TORRES: AN INSPIRING INTERVIEW