Category Archives: Blog

CFA: The 2018 Arts Night Experience

Saturday, April 28, 2018
Mary W. Sommervold Hall
April 28th will be a night to celebrate art in our community. The 57th Annual Arts Night Experience will have a new look and taste. View selected art in the exhibition, Ripple Effect: Arts Night 2018, January 27 – April 22, 2018 in the Everist Gallery.

‘RIPPLE EFFECT’ EXHIBITION SUBMISSION FORM

‘THE WALL’ SUBMISSION FORM

The WALL is a series of small artworks hung on a single wall in the exhibition Ripple Effect: Arts Night 2018. Following the exhibition, the artworks will be displayed at The 2018 Arts Night Experience auction and gala on Saturday, April 28, where they will be sold as part of an online silent auction.

CFA: AVERA PRAIRIE CENTER ROTATING GALLERY

Avera Prairie Center Rotating Gallery

Thank you for choosing to have your artwork featured at the Avera Prairie Center. Please review the information regarding the procedures for accepted artwork into the Rotating Gallery.

– Artwork must be of appropriate content for our patients and family members that utilize our services. We aim to provide a calming, healing experience for our visitors and are sensitive to their current emotional well-being. With that in mind, we recommend images that are uplifting, inspiring, and thought provoking. We will not accept any artwork that has dark, negative themes or images that do not abide by our Christian heritage and ministry.

– It is encouraged to send samples of your artwork to carol.rogers@avera.org.

– New installations of artwork will hang in the gallery for a three month rotation. The Artist is welcome to change out art if needed during that time frame. The Artist must also be willing to change out artwork if asked by staff from Avera.

– Installations are the first week in the quarter the Artist is featured. The Artist is responsible for installation and take down of artwork. If the Artist is unavailable during those times, arrangements can be made for drop off and retrieval of artwork.

– The Rotating Gallery’s 2018 schedule is: January-March, April-June,
July- September, and October-December.

– Artists are not provided any stipend for the use of their artwork. Avera will not reimburse any Artist for their expenses in producing the art works featured in the Rotating Gallery.

– Avera will provide reimbursement due to damages that might occur to artworks that are installed on the Walker Hanging System. Any artwork that is displayed on easels will be at the risk and expense to the Artist.

– The Artist is encouraged to provide a written statement about the artwork featured, and pamphlets, business cards, etc that viewers may take. The Prairie Center has thousands of visitors each month so this offers a great marketing opportunity.

– Avera does not receive a direct stipend for artwork sold while it has been in the Rotating Gallery. If an Artist chooses to donate proceeds from sold artwork, the Artist would need to contact the Avera McKennan Foundation. Donations should identify the Arts in Healing/Integrative Medicine program as the recipient of the donation.

– Please feel free to inform other Artists of this venue.

– All questions regarding the Rotating Gallery may be directed to Carol Rogers at carol.rogers@avera.org.

MAKE ART YOUR BUSINESS

Wish you could just make art for a living? Got the art part down, just not business savvy? We have the perfect opportunity for you. Our Business Class for Artists is guaranteed to get you rolling.

Acquire the knowledge you need in this 4-week, 2-hour class tailored specifically for artists who want to get serious about their art career. Taught by expert and coach Claudia Dail, with special guest appearances by other local experts, you will learn pivotal ways to focus your skills, find your niche, and market yourself. Learn alongside a group of your peers within a supportive, open setting. You’ll be sure to gain lasting relationships.

Quite a few local success stories have sprouted from this unique opportunity. Watch for those stories in the weeks to come. In the meantime, get registered!  Only $85 for all four sessions. Deadline to register is Monday, January 8. Space is limited.

REGISTER HERE

Holiday Crafts for the Not-So-Crafty

[Published in Hood Magazine‘s Holiday Gift Guide 2017.]

Looking for some holiday craft ideas but have no idea where to start? Inspiration comes from all kinds of places, including household items. Our inspiration for these crafts comes from those things we have in the house like clothespins, incomplete puzzles, mismatched plates and candy. Try these kid friendly crafts to jumpstart your imagination with household supplies:

Reindeer Friends. Try making reindeer from old clothespins. Supplies for them include googly eyes, pom poms for a nose, pipe cleaners for antlers, ribbon to hang with and glue. Want to try something a little different? Use a few extra clothespins and some popsicle sticks to make their bodies.

  

Candy Crafts. You can make the reindeer out of candy canes too! Use old candy that’s gone stale from last year or the leftover Halloween sweets. Try building Santa’s train with lifesavers for the engine and mints for wheels. Cut out paper snowflake templates and glue smarties or mints in the patterns.

Puzzle Decorations. From ornaments to door wreaths, old puzzles can make gorgeous decorations. Supplies include a puzzle, paint and hot glue. Paint the puzzle pieces then hot glue them together for the base ring. Then put a layer of glue on top of the base to begin adding more pieces. Repeat until the wreath is as thick as you like.

  Credit to DazzleWhileFrazzled.com for the gorgeous example of a wreath.

Tiered Platter. This craft makes a great housewarming gift for those holiday parties. First, get plates that go together and candlesticks or glasses with different heights. These need to support weight but still look nice. Start with the largest plate and use hot glue or super glue to attach the tallest candlestick on top of it. Let that dry, then glue the unattached end of the candlestick to the bottom of the second plate. Then repeat the process for the next candlestick and plate. Just want a cake stand? Glue the bottom of a strong glass to the underside of a cake plate.


Photo credit to Anna Wu’s blog.

Most craft supplies can be found at thrift stores or dollar stores if you don’t already have them at home. Visit local craft stores like JAM Art & Supplies for quality art materials like paints and brushes to add some flair to your projects. Want more craft ideas? Search “DIY gifts” on Pinterest to see what you can find!

DAVID SIEH: AN INSPIRED INTERVIEW

Talking with David Sieh in his gallery at the 8th and Railroad Center was a great experience. I learned a lot about what it means to be a contemporary naturalist, and how David approaches his work. Though a small space, Se Gallery was a brightly lit workspace with a lot going on. Getting a glimpse into his artistic process and journey as an artist was a treat.
-Rachel

Rachel: Can you tell me a little bit about yourself as an artist and your preferred medium to work with?

David: Sure. I guess, like we were talking about before, I grew up in the Twin Cities area and then moved here. So my art evolved from nature, landscape and wildlife. Then I was exposed to more contemporary, abstract art, then very influenced by the New York school of artists, all the abstract expressionists and then into pop-art. So my art kind of combines all of that.

About me, I grew up in nature, surrounded by nature and I always had a love of art, to use color and design. Stuff with that really developed my interest in art and I schooled in art so I just continued down that path I guess.

David got his Bachelor of Sciences degree with an emphasis in art from the University of Sioux Falls after bouncing to Augustana and Vermillion for a while. He’s been making art for 30 plus years. He’s been in his current gallery space for over 5 years.

You write that exposure to Terry Redlin’s work drove you to a career in art. What about him and his work inspired you to start making art?

When I was in high school, Terry Redlin was living in Hastings, Minnesota. He was one of the first people to inspire me as far as having a career in art. I actually did go over to his house–his home studio–when he was very first promoting his work. He inspired me in that a person could do the art and make a living. I was very much into nature and environmental art at that time, and I still am. Even though my work doesn’t emulate his work or really show any influence of him, his career path influenced me.

You call yourself a contemporary naturalist painter. What does that mean to you personally and how does it affect your work as an artist?

I’m very inspired by nature, that’s where I recharge my batteries. I have to be alone in nature. I try to do a little bit everyday, even if it’s just walking down the sidewalk or just in the backyard; to kind of get in-tune, get in a rhythm with nature, so as a naturalist I learn from nature. Just seeing how complicated things are…color patterns, designs, all that stuff influences my aesthetic. As a contemporary naturalist, I express that in my own painting through my gestures, colors, compositions. So, my work comes off as non-representational a lot of the time, but still influenced by nature.

You started drawing and painting when you were young “as a form of communication.” How does art communicate to you and how do you see yourself communicating through art to others?

On the representation level it’s a relatively cut and dry conversation where people just see me representing nature or an image. Then I can also combine those images with other aspects so it changes the dialogue to where it makes things a little more complicated. People have to think about the relationship of two images side by side, often times in a conservation aspect where it makes you think about the fragile-ness of nature, also the complexities of nature. Then, if you were to look at the abstract art, it doesn’t necessarily have a dialogue about nature. Its dialogue is more of an emotional impact where hopefully people look at it and have an emotional, maybe even a physical reaction to it. You know, that guttural reaction where you really like something or you really don’t, and then you stop and think about why you do or don’t like it.

Do you feel like you have a responsibility through your art to communicate those things or feel as though you have a responsibility as an artist?

I definitely do. I feel that I have the ability, or talent or sometimes I even feel like I’m a medium. I don’t even know exactly where the work comes from or what the work is, I’m just the medium putting the work down. So yes, I feel that I do have a responsibility to create as much art as I physically can just to get those conversations rolling.

As a part of the Sioux Falls art community, what do you think of the art scene?

There’s a real good talent pool here in town, a lot of people interested in it, but as far as a collector base and as far as general public knowledge it’s really minimal. But it seems to grow a bit all the time.

David’s list of in-town favorite shows include the past “Artists Against Hunger” shows and the Washington Pavilion’s Arts Night. He recommends Exposure, Post Pilgrim, Rehfeld’s and Piper. His work can currently be found at Piper and his studio at 8th and Railroad. He has also done murals at the Great Plains Zoo and Delbridge Museum.

How often do you create new work? And how long does a piece usually take you to finish?

As you can see, I’ve got work that’s in different stages of finish. I paint every single day. I’m in the process constantly. I’m never out of the process.

I’m gonna go with the usual 50 years and 10 minutes. It’s years and years of developing your technique and style.

Do you have any future plans for shows or specific pieces of art?

For me the art career and the whole thing is a combination of steady and consistent and patience. I’ve been doing this for 30+ years, so for me it’s the long term game.

David does accept commissions, seeing them as “Totally relevant and necessary, and part of the process.”

Follow his work through his Facebook page.

CFA: Student Creative Arts Competitions

With cash prizes up to $5,000, The ArtEffect Project recognizes student art projects that creatively interpret an Unsung Hero story through a visual arts project, short narrative film, play, or creative story. The ArtEffect Project is open to U.S. and international students in grades 6-12 and has a deadline of February 15, 2018. More info and a free 10 step art lesson plan can be found HERE.
With cash prizes up to $7,500, the Discovery Award recognizes student projects that celebrate Unsung Heroes from history uncovered through student research and creatively presented in a student-produced documentary film, play, or website. The Discovery Award is open to U.S. and international students in grades 4-12 and has a deadline of July 1, 2018. More info can be found HERE.
Both competitions are free to enter and offer a number of unrestricted cash prizes. But the real prize of these projects is invaluable—namely, that they are academically rigorous while simultaneously building character, civic participation, and a sense of shared humanity amongst young people.

WEAVING A COMMUNITY THROUGH CREATIVE USE

Weaving is recognized as one of the oldest crafts, dating as far back as 6000 BC. Beginning as a product of necessity, weaving looms were used to create clothing, bedding, and other textiles of a protective nature. This applied art developed into a means of expression, tapestries woven for posterity, for pleasure, for interaction.

When I began weaving four years ago, I had no idea what I was doing. I had been intrigued by the craft, and was looking to experiment in a new medium. My journey began when we tore down the half pipe skate ramp in my backyard. Using a four foot scrap of weathered plywood and about 200 nails, I had built myself a machine! Yes, it was warped, full of splinters and even kind of smelly, but it was mine. The design of the loom has not overcomplicated itself, and I was intrigued to use a method that had been utilized throughout time, and all over the globe.

After creating a few weaves, I began to learn, to understand. I adapted my design, and with the help of my father, built a new, improved frame loom. Something with an adjustable stand, something… easy to transport. Through trial and error, I have developed several variations of a standing loom since then, with designs for myself, Hawthorne Elementary, and for JAM Art and Supplies.

Art Teacher Lisa Brunick with her loom at Hawthorne Elementary

Two years ago, we began bringing the JAM loom with us to our booth at summer festivals. We attended events throughout the Sioux Empire, such as: the 605 Summer Classic, Jazzfest, the Farmer’s Market, That Sounds Decent, as well as the Sidewalk Arts Festival. Bringing this loom provided us a way to interact with the crowd, an icebreaker as well as a means to sharing our Creative Reuse mission with young and old alike.

Weaving is a popular means of community building across the country. Using a shared loom is a means of creating your own image and story. The viewer is provided with an actualized representation of problem solving, threads and materials interacting in a self-sustained chaos. Our community weaves represent Sioux Falls, and each participant that helped create the piece.

Each weave that was created was made from donated material, and gave purpose to some otherwise overlooked materials. Our weaves contain everything from yarn, fabric scraps, fake flowers, men’s neckwear, to old sweaters and jewelry. To date, JAM has created 11 large-scale weaves in the past two years, all made from the helping hands of our community. There is pride in production, and we are just beaming.

Please, join JAM on November 9th at Remedy Brewing Company for an all-ages get-together and fundraiser. Drink fine local craft beer, listen to live music, learn how to weave, and take a chance or 5 or 10 at winning one of our beautiful, community-crafted weavings!

Raffle Tickets are $10 each or 3 for $20.

You can pre-purchase raffle tickets at JAM anytime before the event, but make sure you join us the night of because we’re giving away a JAM VIP Membership, and you must be present to win. JAM VIP Memberships are a $250 value that includes one complimentary in-house event, a tshirt, bumper sticker, and 25% off every purchase made in our store!

ART STUDENTS CREATE STEAMROLLER PRINTS

Though the wind may have been a minor nuisance, it was a beautiful, sunny day to create art outdoors on Thursday, October 12. For the first time ever, in a parking lot on the campus of Augustana, a dozen art students and 2 faculty collaborated with Myrl & Roy’s Paving in Sioux Falls to create large-scale prints using a steamroller.

Working in teams, students spent months prior preparing their 4-by-8-foot fiberboards, utilizing everything from traditional hand-carving tools to electric routers in order to create a relief. The surfaces were inked, covered with material, paper, carpet, a board, then pressed by the steamroller to create the print. The pressure of the steamroller was crucial for image transfer.

Part of the challenge was to find fabric large enough to print on.  While many students used bedsheets, some were able to find fabric large enough. One group used a piece of satin that printed very well. Another group decided to quilt together pieces of fabric so that the colors coordinated with parts of the image in order to create a color-blocked, screen printed feel. It turned out fantastic!

Photo courtesy of Senior Art Student Katie Munson

Students found that designs with more detail, though beautiful, tended to be more difficult to image than those with less intricate carvings.

Approximately 50 large-scale prints were created in five hours. Some of them are currently hanging in the atrium of the humanities building at Augie through the end of the semester. Be sure to check them out!

Photo courtesy of Senior Art Student Katie Munson

Faculty:

  • Chad Nelson
  • Lindsay Twa

Augustana Students:

  • Colter Benson
  • Breanna Burklund
  • Taisya  Gowlovech
  • Hannah  Grapevine
  • Nora Strom
  • Lotte Solvang
  • Ajla Sundstrom
  • Ella Ng
  • Wyatt Dickson
  • Katlin Munson

Iowa State Students:

  • Caleb Henkelman
  • Jordan Luckow

Creative Soul Gathering

Creative people thrive off of each other. You are invited! You take your own supplies and materials and are doted on with amazing food, snacks, gorgeous views, and fellowship and crafting into the wee hours. See contact info below.

Volunteer Spotlight: Sara Bainter

The Volunteer Spotlight is a new series here on the JAM blog and I am a new blogger, so it’s a perfect match. You may be asking yourself what is the Volunteer Spotlight? Well, let me tell you. Each month we will pick one of the wonderful volunteers here at JAM and ask them many different questions about volunteering, their lives and any projects they’re excited about and want to share with us.

Ideally, I want to sit down face-to-face with my interviewee over a hot cup of tea, unfortunately for my first interview that wasn’t exactly how it went. Our busy schedules kept us apart, but email brought us together.  Say hello to the wonderful artist and poet, Sara Bainter, whom I have the pleasure of volunteering with at JAM.

Here it goes…

Shanda: How long have you been a volunteer at JAM? And why did you get involved?

Sara: I officially started volunteering January 2017? I started getting involved because I knew it would be a great place to volunteer and give back to a community that I felt like had already given so much to me artistically and otherwise since I moved here in March 2016.

What is the best part for you about volunteering at JAM?

The best part is getting to see all of the people who are shocked at the low price of their craft or art supplies, and are going home to create! I also love watching people’s reactions as they leave Exposure Gallery. It’s just a great feeling to experience it first hand.

What do you do at JAM?

I goof off or doodle a huge percentage of the time, and sometimes I put donations out like I’m supposed to. I like to help with Weird Art Wednesdays when I can. I love watching people of all ages come in and use art supplies for free for two hours while we work on creating projects together!

What would you tell someone who is thinking about volunteering at JAM?

You will be so appreciated and needed! Please help. (laughs out loud)

What is your art background?

I feel like that’s a very long story that maybe I should write. But it starts with me being very bored, isolated and lonely in Winner, South Dakota.

What project are you currently working on that you are really excited about?

Right now I’m in the middle of moving and turning my bedroom into an art installation to facilitate more dreaming and imagining.

You have a book coming out soon, tell us a little about that.

Campfire Poetry is the paraphrased journey of heartbreak, devastation and hope, which I illustrated with various mixed media. There is a guest illustration by Christopher Reistroffer! My intention is to give creative control of the lyrics to many different bands and see what comes out of those ideas and performances!

You have beautiful illustration in your book. What came first to you, the paintings or the words?

Thank you! The words definitely came first. It seems like suddenly poetry bled from every pore and I didn’t know when it would stop.

What emotions will be triggered while reading your book?

I’m hoping some people will feel empathy. Maybe others will feel like they are not the only ones with these experiences. I want hope to be a big part of the Campfire Poetry experience.

What was the most challenging part of writing this book? And what was the most rewarding part?

The challenging part of writing is in experiencing conflict worthy of inspiring others. I don’t think I have to talk specifically about what I went through, but I do have to talk about falling down and getting back up in the unique way that I did. I felt like I had no other choice than to write this book, and once it started coming together, I felt a deep responsibility to share it with others in hopes that it will help them.

How does it feel to finally have it done and in your hands?

I really only have had access to the only copy of the proof, and even though I had to change and fix a lot of things, it woke me up and I felt an even deeper responsibility to get the book into the hands of the right people.

Where and when can we buy your book?

The first copies of campfire poetry get here on November 6th. It will be available on Amazon.com. Just search Campfire Poetry or Sara Bainter… or stop me in the street and demand a copy because I will have some on me when they come out!

 

If you would like to volunteer at JAM our next hour-long training session will be Monday October 30th from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m. Must be 18 years old to volunteer alone, but under 18 can volunteer with a parent! You can find more info here.