Category Archives: Around and About

ART STUDENTS CREATE STEAMROLLER PRINTS

Though the wind may have been a minor nuisance, it was a beautiful, sunny day to create art outdoors on Thursday, October 12. For the first time ever, in a parking lot on the campus of Augustana, a dozen art students and 2 faculty collaborated with Myrl & Roy’s Paving in Sioux Falls to create large-scale prints using a steamroller.

Working in teams, students spent months prior preparing their 4-by-8-foot fiberboards, utilizing everything from traditional hand-carving tools to electric routers in order to create a relief. The surfaces were inked, covered with material, paper, carpet, a board, then pressed by the steamroller to create the print. The pressure of the steamroller was crucial for image transfer.

Part of the challenge was to find fabric large enough to print on.  While many students used bedsheets, some were able to find fabric large enough. One group used a piece of satin that printed very well. Another group decided to quilt together pieces of fabric so that the colors coordinated with parts of the image in order to create a color-blocked, screen printed feel. It turned out fantastic!

Photo courtesy of Senior Art Student Katie Munson

Students found that designs with more detail, though beautiful, tended to be more difficult to image than those with less intricate carvings.

Approximately 50 large-scale prints were created in five hours. Some of them are currently hanging in the atrium of the humanities building at Augie through the end of the semester. Be sure to check them out!

Photo courtesy of Senior Art Student Katie Munson

Faculty:

  • Chad Nelson
  • Lindsay Twa

Augustana Students:

  • Colter Benson
  • Breanna Burklund
  • Taisya  Gowlovech
  • Hannah  Grapevine
  • Nora Strom
  • Lotte Solvang
  • Ajla Sundstrom
  • Ella Ng
  • Wyatt Dickson
  • Katlin Munson

Iowa State Students:

  • Caleb Henkelman
  • Jordan Luckow

FIRST FRIDAY LOWDOWN

It is a loaded October First Friday! With Downtown Sioux Falls hosting the annual Art and Wine Walk, there are a lot of places to be, and a lot of art to see. Here’s a list of what’s going down, Wine Walk and otherwise!


First Friday Art & Wine Walk! A wide variety of artists and wine samples await, as you visit locations on both sides of the river in Downtown Sioux Falls from 5:00 – 9:00pm. Viewing the art and meeting artists is FREE, and for just $20, you’ll get a wristband to enjoy one sample of wine at each location. You can also purchase wine by the glass for $5. Wristbands can be purchased at any participating location on October 6, 2017, from 5:00 – 9:00pm.

2017 WINE WALK
Participating Locations and Artists:

8th & RR Center: 401 East 8th Street #200A (Two artists)
Red Door Creations – Painter
Dylan Jacobson
 – Cartoonist
Wine options:
Cupcake Riesling or 19 Crimes Banished Red Blend

A League of Your Own: 229 South Phillips Avenue
Nathan Rueckert – Recycled Baseball Art
Wine Options:
Luccio Peach Moscato or Cocobon Dark Red

Atoley Salon: 317 South Phillips Avenue
Rebekah Scott – Handmade Purses/Accessories
Wine Options:
Anna Pesä Synphony or Phat Hogg Red

Atoley Spa: 317 South Phillips Avenue
Chelsea Munson – Makeup Artistry
Wine Options:
Chloe Rose or Carnivor Zinfandel

Bead Co./Acorn19: 319 South Phillips Avenue
York & ME – Jewelry Art

Wine Options:
19 Crimes Hard Chard or 19 Crimes Banished Red Blend

CH Patisserie: 309 South Phillips Avenue #1
Merecedes Nelson – Photographer

Wine Options:
Benziger Chardonnay or Finca Las Moras Malbec

Chelsea’s Boutique: 220 South Phillips Avenue
Elisabeth Hunstad – Singer/Songwriter

Wine Options:
Slow Press Sauvignon Blanc or Concannon Petite Sirah

City Hall – Mayor’s Office: 224 West 9th Street – Artist Only Location
Various Artists – Pictured: Adam Petersen

Artist Only Location

Coffea Roasterie: 200 South Phillips Avenue
Amy Jarding – Weaver

Wine Options:
Alma Mora Sauvignon Blanc or William Hill Cabernet

Conversation Piece: 301 South Minnesota Avenue
Create Yourself a Make-&-Take Mug

Wine Options:
Risata Moscato d’Asti or Storypoint Pinot Noir

Great Outdoor Store: 201 East 10th Street
Reina Okawa – Mixed Media

Wine Options:
Mirassou Pinot Grigio or William Hill Cabernet

Home Porch Gifts: 217 South Phillips Avenue
Elaine Fritz – Stamp & Papercraft

Wine Options:
Concannon Founders Chardonnay or Cupcake Petite Sirah

J.H. & Sons: 216 South Phillips Avenue
Kirby Schultz – Painter

Wine Options:
Benziger Chardonnay or Insurrection Cabernet

JLG Architects: 232 South Main Avenue
Dustin Sinner – Painter

Wine Options:
Cupcake Riesling or Finca Las Moras Malbec

Lot 2029: 207 South Phillips Avenue
Art Diaz & Abby Hatch – Musicians

Wine Options:
Risata Moscato d’Asti or Leese Fitch Merlot

Luca’s Boutique: 401 East 8th Street #122
Rodger Ellingson – Painter

Wine Options:
Luccio Peach Moscato or Carnivor Zinfandel

NV Studio: 106 West 11th Street
Connie Herring – Sculptor/Jewelry Art

Artist Only Location

Plum’s Cooking Co.: 401 East 8th Street #107
Linda Napolitano – Cookie Artist/Baker

Wine Options:
Alma Mora Sauvignon Blanc or William Hill Cabernet

Prairie Berry East Bank: 322 East 8th Street
Mary Payton – Painter

Wine Options:
Anna Pesä Meritage 2014 or Red Ass Rhubarb

Rehfeld’s Art and Framing: 210 South Phillips Avenue
Kelly Dudgeon Tadlock – Painter

Wine Options:
Concannon Founders Chardonnay or Cocobon Dark Red

Rug & Relic: 401 East 8th Street #114
Jamie Jacobson – Painter

Wine Options:
Slow Press Sauvignon Blanc Crisp or Luccio Peach Moscato

Say Anything Jewelry: 225 South Phillips Avenue
Michael Swenson – Wood Working

Wine Options:
Alma Mora Sauvignon Blanc or Dark Horse Red Blend

Simply Perfect: 401 East 8th Street #108
Mercedes Maltese – Pottery and Henna

Wine Options:
Chloe Rose or Leese Fitch Merlot

Sioux Falls Design Center: 108 West 11th Street
Paul Boerboom – Painter

Wine Options:
Risata Moscato d’Asti or Concannon Petite Sirah

State Theatre: 316 South Phillips Avenue
Jim Sturdevant – Painter

Wine Options:
Mirassou Pinot Grigio or Leese Fitch Merlot

Sticks and Steel: 401 East 8th Street #118
Artist TBD Monday, October 2nd
Wine Options:
19 Crimes Hard Chard or Finca Las Moras Malbec

Unglued: 218 South Phillips Avenue
Cambium Wood Art

Wine Options:
Chloe Rose or Dark Horse Red Blend

Urban Archaeology: 126 South Phillips Avenue
Elizabeth Munger – Printmaker/Custom Letterpress

Wine Options:
Anna Pesä Synphony or Phat Hogg Red

Young and Richard’s: 222 South Phillips Avenue
Ne’Qwa Ornaments – Glass Ornaments

Wine Options:
Cupcake Riesling or Storypoint Pinot Noir

ALSO BE SURE TO CHECK OUT:

LOADED DECKS
Third Eye at Vishnu
7 to 11 p.m.
A juried skateboard art show. Twenty artists show their deck work along side a piece of their own art and will be judged best in show.

FREE FIRST FRIDAY
Washington Pavilion VAC
5 to 8 p.m.
6 p.m. Gallery Talks for the “South Dakota Governor’s 7th Biennial Art Exhibition” in the Everist Gallery.

FLIGHT EPHEMERAL
Exposure Gallery
6 to 9 p.m.
We’re back on First Friday this month with new work from painter/illustrator Sharon Wegner-Larsen and illustrator/graphic designer Molly O’Connor.

2ND ANNUAL PARKLET DESIGN COMPETITION
Sioux Falls Design Center
12 to 7 p.m.
“What do you get when you take six parking spaces along 11th street and turn them over to students from SDSU’s School of Design?” “The 2nd Annual Parklet Design Competition!” Come explore unique roadside installations and rethink how you view parking downtown. Play and public voting 12:00 – 7:00 pm. Awards at 7:15 pm

30th Annual Northern Plains Indian Art Market

The 30th annual Northern Plains Indian Art Market (NPIAM) continues its tradition of celebrating world-class American Indian art in a three-day event, September 22-24, in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The event showcases over 30 professional artists and features local artists such as: Kevin Brave Heart, Don Montileaux, Jim Yellow Hawk, Dwayne Wilcox, Jennifer White, Lynn Burnette, and Richard Red Owl.

NPIAM is an international gathering of American Indian artists—those who work in contemporary fine arts and those who create art using traditional materials, methods and styles. The show has become a national staple in showcasing American Indian art of the Northern Plains and artists have gained recognition through national publications and exhibits.

The event begins with an Art Reception and Juried Art Show at the Old Courthouse Museum in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, on Friday, September 22, from 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Artist Reception and Juried Art Show admission: $25.00 per person. The Juried Art show allows entries to compete for prestigious awards including: Best of Show—$1,500; Best of Fine Arts—$1,000; and Best of Tribal Arts—$1,000. Judging for the 2017 NPIAM Juried Show will take place Friday, September 22. Awards totaling more than $13,000 are also given in 18 art and medium divisions.
Jurors are selected from a national pool of American Indian art experts, scholars, and respected working artists. This year NPIAM welcomes Jill Ahlberg Yohe, Assistant Curator of Native American Art from Minneapolis Institute of Art; Angela Swedberg, Contemporary Artist and Certified Indian Artisan; Alexander Brier Marr, PhD Candidate in Visual and Cultural Studies from University of Rochester; and Jeffrey L. Viken, Chair, The Heritage Center at Red Cloud Indian School, Pine Ridge Reservation.

Juror’s forums are also being scheduled as part of the NPIAM’s mission to educate art enthusiasts about American Indian Art and its significance to Indian Culture. Forums are free and open to the public.
The event continues for Art Market days, September 23-24, at the Sioux Falls Convention Center. Market days allow participating artist to sell their work directly to art collectors, enthusiasts and local art buyers. The market is open Saturday, September 23, 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., and Sunday, September 24, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Art Market Admission is $5.00 daily or $7.00 for a 2-day pass, children under 12 are free.

About NPIAM The Northern Plains Indian Art Market (NPIAM) was established in 1988 by American Indian Services, Inc., of Sioux Falls, SD, as the Northern Plains Tribal Arts Show (NPTA). To be eligible to enter the NPIAM a Native American artist must be an enrolled member of 1 of 33 tribes in the United States and Canada the show recognizes as “Northern Plains.” American Indian Services produced the juried art show and market from 1988 to 2003. Since 2004, Sinte Gleska University of Rosebud, South Dakota, has been the producing organization. In the 30 years of its existence–one of the longest running Indian art shows in the country–over 800 artists from 7 Northern Plains states and two Canadian provinces have exhibited at NPTA/NPIAM. For more information, visit npiam.org or call Sinte Gleska University at 605-856-8100.

An Evening of Art, Architecture and Community

with keynote by Dale Lamphere
AIA South Dakota
Thursday, September 14, 2017 from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM (CDT)
Sioux Falls, SD
TICKETS HERE

Renowned sculptor and South Dakota artist laureate Dale Lamphere will give a free, public presentation as part of a celebration of art, architecture and community on Thursday, Sept. 14 in Sioux Falls.

An Evening of Art, Architecture and Community is sponsored by Architecture Incorporated and presented by the American Institute of Architects (AIA) South Dakota and the Great Plains chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA). The event begins at 7 p.m. at the Best Western Plus Ramkota Hotel on 3200 W. Maple St., with tickets available to the public at no charge.

AIA South Dakota will also recognize SDSU alumnus and business leader Jerry Lohr of J. Lohr Vineyards and Wines for his unparalleled support of the SDSU Department of Architecture.

Lamphere sculpted the breathtaking Dignity Statue that perches atop a bluff overlooking the Missouri River in Chamberlain and has been further immortalized in specialty state license plates. Lamphere has also been commissioned to build the Arc of Dreams, a massive stainless steel sculpture that will span the Big Sioux River in downtown Sioux Falls.

Lamphere will give a solo keynote presentation and take questions from the audience. An Evening of Art, Architecture and Community will also feature a brief panel on how art and architecture intermingle to shape community that will include:

Panelist: Dan Pitera, FAIA, executive director of the Detroit Collaborative Design Center and recipient of the coveted Whitney Young Award.
Panelist: Tanya Olson, ASLA, PLA, principal/owner at Tallgrass Landscape Architecture in Custer.
Panelist: Tim Barry, artist and managing partner of Hot Shops Art Center in Omaha.
Panelist: Kristine Bjerke, AIA, principal architect of Architecture Incorporated in Rapid City
Panelist: Dale Lamphere, South Dakota artist laureate, sculptor, owner of Lamphere Studio near Sturgis and founding board member of Arts South Dakota.
Moderator: Patri Acevedo, AIA, CPHC, vice president/present-elect of AIA South Dakota and market leader with JLG Architects in Rapid City.

“Release the Cranes” at the Washington Pavilion

For five years Reina Okawa’s cranes have greeted visitors at the north entrance of the Washington Pavilion. But this fall, the exhibit comes down. This Tuesday, August 29, the Pavilion offers a last gathering to appreciate the cranes that have become a fixture in the Sioux Falls community. The cranes have been at the Pavilion so long that Meagan Dion, the lead curator for the Visual Arts Center, clarified that the exhibit was always a temporary one. “It wasn’t ever intended to become a permanent installation,” she said. “But we wanted to give people as much time to appreciate [the cranes] as possible.”

Reina Okawa’s original sketch for “You, Me and the Cranes”

Since they were installed in 2012, the cranes have become a Sioux Falls community favorite. The send-off event  on August 29, “Release the Cranes! A Farewell Party”, celebrates the partnership between Reina Okawa and the Pavilion and gives the community a chance to say goodbye to the exhibit. Okawa will be at the event, though the actual removal of the cranes will not happen until later. The 30-foot-long strings of “You, Me and the Cranes” hold thousands of origami cranes, a limited number of which will be given away early at the party.

The farewell party intends to alert everyone that the cranes are going away, and ensure that the community has a chance to say goodbye. “We just want to make sure people can enjoy them one last time,” said Dion.

Some of Okawa’s other origami work is on display in the “Above the Fold” exhibit in the Visual Arts Center Gallery until September 16, 2017. The Visual Arts Center will be closed during the farewell party, but the cranes and her work in the gallery can be viewed any time the building is open until the end of the exhibition.
Please join us in saying goodbye to the cranes from 6-7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, August 29. If you’ve only seen the large cranes towards the bottom of the strings, try going to the fourth floor to see the smaller more colorful ones! You can RSVP on Facebook to the “Release the Cranes! A Farewell Party”

-Rachel

Above the Fold: New Expressions in Origami

(June 24-September 16, 2017)
Everest Gallery of the Washington Pavilion

It seems to me that the Washington Pavilion often appears as just a landmark to Sioux Falls inhabitants, and not much else. Contrary to this perception, however, the Pavilion is always changing; providing new sights, activities, and learning experiences. Recently, the Pavilion’s Visual Arts Center staff transformed their largest gallery (the Everest Gallery) to accommodate an exhibition that travels internationally. The show, Above the Fold: New Expressions in Origami, has been traveling since 2015, and features unique works of origami from artists around the world.

***********************

With my first step into the gallery, I was immediately aware that I would not be peering at any paper cranes that day. Instead, I was greeted by whimsical, inflated creatures that dangled from the ceiling, and fantastic forms encased in blown glass bubbles that surely could not be made of paper. The Pavilion’s assistant curator, Sarah Odens, was right when she stated that this “is origami like most of us have never seen before.” The works vary from large-scale installations, to optical illusions that hang flat on the wall. A massive, seven-foot-tall piece by Jiangmei Wu, is waiting in the back of the gallery to take your breath away!

While exploring the show, I also took some time to watch the PBS film that is screening in gallery. To my surprise, the artists interviewed within the film are many of the same artists featured within this show. I’m glad I took a few minutes to listen, as it outlined how these artists are at the forefront of the origami realm, but are also wildly intelligent engineers, architects, and mathematicians. They are not only changing the way we think about origami, but also how the science of folding can be applied to real world problems! I learned that origami artists like Robert Lang and Erik and Martin Demaine have used paper folding to solve issues surrounding air bag folding, expandable space telescopes, and human proteins that fold to fight disease!

I highly recommend making a stop at the Pavilion to see this show. As Odens mentioned, “pictures do not do this work justice… to see all these folds up close and in person is an experience.” Allow yourself to be amazed by these pieces! Make “connections to the origami [you] learned when [you] were young… and then see what paper can do and what origami artists, with science and mathematics, can achieve.”

This international show will be on display in the Everest Gallery of the Washington Pavilion until September 16, 2017. And don’t forget about Free First Fridays! On August 4th, not only will entrance to the Visual Arts Center be free, Robert Lang (one of the many artists and engineers featured in this show) will be speaking about his work, his education, and how he uses origami to solve real-world issues. Don’t miss out! Lang is speaking at 7 p.m. in the Belbas Theater of the Pavilion.

SIOUX FALLS PRIDE FESTIVAL

On Saturday, June 17, Sioux Falls held their Pride Festival at Terrace Park. Many people ventured out in the spurts of rain to enjoy being amongst the fun. There was a sense of unity and belonging for those in the LGBT+ community; it was such a beautiful feeling. Seeing the various flags representing different groups from the community was grand. There was your classic rainbow flag, but flags such as the bisexual flag and transgender flag were present. Many people sported their flags; whether they were using them as capes, painting them on their faces, or wearing clothes with their flag’s colors.

There was a variety of booths at the festival. Many booths offered information on topics such as LGBT+ rights, STDs, suicide, and many more. Many booths offered items for free, items like rainbow bracelets, rainbow sweatbands, pamphlets, pens, highlighters, chapsticks, and condoms. There was a booth for kids that allowed for crafts to be made, and another that had paper and paints for painting your own flag. Another attraction for the children was a bounce house, which sat near the crafts area. Flags, cups, stickers, pins, clothes, and jewelry designed with LGBT+ flags were also being sold at the event. If you were like me and had no cool rainbow gear, then this was the place to stock up on tons of it.

Down over at the stage, food and drinks were being sold. On the stage was a rainbow banner which read “#SUFUPRIDE”. Speakers stood on stage and spoke, performers played music, and drag shows were held. There also was an American Sign Language interpreter present. The drag shows were an exciting experience full of music and talented drag queens, and a drag king, showing off their talented dance moves and lip syncing skills. A performer dressed as Hulk Hogan even joined the stage for a bit. Overall, it was a fantastic time. An important thing I learned from the drag show was to tip the queens and kings. They deserve that money for all their amazing talent.

This was my first Pride, and it was an amazing experience. The feeling of happiness that I felt was extreme. I felt like a dog in a dinosaur skeleton exhibit. There was so much to see, learn, and buy. It also felt so open, like I could be true to myself. The area of the park that the event was held was packed. Many people from different generations were there: elders, adults, children, and babies. The amount of dogs there was astounding, as well. It was an event for families, friends, for everyone in the LGBT+ people, and their supporters. Definitely a unifying experience for LGBT+ community of Sioux Falls.

I highly recommend that all LGBT+ people, their families, friends, and supporters around the Sioux Falls area should venture down to Pride next year. It is an experience you will never forget. It is an event full of fun, love, and acceptance; an event to be who you are.

The Center for Equality/Sioux Falls Pride website: Here
Sioux Falls Pride Facebook page: Here

Beware the Locals – Coming soon!

Does Sioux Falls really have interesting things that happen within the city? You bet ya’! Filmmaker Dempsey Tapley has taken on the challenge of capturing these interesting things and people in the form of film–Beware the Locals. As time ticks faster, and as we approach another lovely Sioux Falls summer, I am genuinely excited to see all of the collaborative work come together. ~Hannah Continue reading Beware the Locals – Coming soon!

VAC GALLERY TALKS TOMORROW NIGHT

Carl Grupp will be speaking at 6:30 about his current exhibition with his own artwork, featured alongside pieces from his personal collection. Carl’s show is especially exciting for printmakers in our area; boasting a display of famous prints from Hokusai, Whistler, Goya, but also features local artists like Julie Punt, Mary Selvig, Martin Wanserski, and Lloyd Menard.

Also speaking, Brian Frink at 6 p.m. His show features colorful, strangely shaped paintings he calls “Magical landscapes” that reference the landscape of his surroundings in Mankato, MN. The paintings hang unconventionally from floor to ceiling in strange configurations. Frink is also the chairman of the Dept. of Art at the University of MN – Mankato, and owns the Blue Earth County Poor Farm, which acts as his studio and gathering place for creatives.

It is Free First Friday at the Visual Arts Center from 5 to 8.