Photo Tour: Ka-Chunk

On Friday, November 10, we had the opportunity to attend a local, one-of-a-kind vending machine art show at Ipso Gallery called “Ka-Chunk.” Both the prizes, as well as the machines were created by an assemblage of 30+ local artists. The engineer of Steve Bormes‘ dispenser even made the effort to create a wheelchair-friendly push button, a refreshing consideration! So impressed.

Tokens sold out not quite an hour into the evening. Prepared for the demand, the gallery had a collection of Fresh Produce limited edition swag to keep the vending going. It was a packed house from start to finish, and plenty for people of all ages. Here’s a little photo tour of the creative machines and prizes artists came up with for the night! 

EASTBANK POSTCARD SHOW

Eastbank Art Gallery Postcard Show
Show: November 28 to December 30
Reception: Friday December 1, 5-8 p.m.

A large collection of 4×6 original artist creations at $30 each.
Reception will feature dozens of artists and the show will continue through the month.
eastbankartgallery.net

FIRST FRIDAY REVIEW: NOVEMBER

This month I stopped by shows at Eastbank, Rug & Relic, and the Washington Pavilion. No new shows at the Pavilion this month, but all of the great activities for kids still happened. There were so many artists talking about their work at Eastbank, I spent most of my time there. The variety of work made fewer stops on my route doable, but I highly recommend stopping by some other locations as well. The Museum of Visual Materials and Rehfeld’s were two stops I had on my list. See more art shows on the Sioux Falls Arts Council webpage.            -Rachel

RUG & RELIC

This First Friday, Rug & Relic hosted a one-night-only feature show of over 150 pieces from Chris Vance. Vance’s work plays on familiar cartoon-like styles and bright colors to bring his work to life. Pieces like “Peanut Butter” take a more abstract turn, but use the same colors and curvy lines as his other styles. Other work on display at Rug & Relic included light sculptures from Steve Bormes, and paintings from other area artists.

EASTBANK

The first artist talk of the evening came from John Kolb. His art style is influenced heavily by his Christian roots. Kolb joked that the goal of one of the pieces on display was to see how many different ways he could do a cross. His pieces focus on shapes in a more abstract approach. He feels that sometimes he gets “locked into” greens and blues occasionally. Using a layering technique with his colors, Kolb’s pieces can get up to 5 coats of paint. He has around 5 pieces on display at Eastbank .

Linda Ackland-Kolb gave the second talk of the night, presenting and describing her pastel-painted beeswax works of art. Her pieces, though small, take a lot of work to get right. She fielded questions about the framing process as well, which is delicate since she does not use sealant to set her pieces. The work on display at Eastbank is a series of vessels and some fashion inspired pieces. Linda plans to branch into more clothing inspired pieces next.

Warren Arends ventured from on-canvas art into stonework and jewelery. His work started as a hobby, but now Arends has two students in soldering. He turns colorful stones from all different countries and continents into pendants and rings. His business, Arends Agates, custom makes every piece for individual requests.

Scott Chleborad was another featured artist at Eastbank. His work combines painting and photography that results in often psychedelic landscapes. Chleborad’s talk was short and to the point, with a few anecdotes about his process. His work with light and contrast makes his work unique and beautiful.

All of the artists’ work at Eastbank is worth a trip to 8th and Railroad to see. More than just these four artists have work on display, and the work they brought is just as exciting. Next First Friday, Eastbank will be doing a “postcard sale” of local art, so be sure to check out the current work on display before then.

 

CFA: Student Creative Arts Competitions

With cash prizes up to $5,000, The ArtEffect Project recognizes student art projects that creatively interpret an Unsung Hero story through a visual arts project, short narrative film, play, or creative story. The ArtEffect Project is open to U.S. and international students in grades 6-12 and has a deadline of February 15, 2018. More info and a free 10 step art lesson plan can be found HERE.
With cash prizes up to $7,500, the Discovery Award recognizes student projects that celebrate Unsung Heroes from history uncovered through student research and creatively presented in a student-produced documentary film, play, or website. The Discovery Award is open to U.S. and international students in grades 4-12 and has a deadline of July 1, 2018. More info can be found HERE.
Both competitions are free to enter and offer a number of unrestricted cash prizes. But the real prize of these projects is invaluable—namely, that they are academically rigorous while simultaneously building character, civic participation, and a sense of shared humanity amongst young people.

CFA: Brookings Arts Council Photography Exhibition

For South Dakota artists ages 14 and older

This January, the Brookings Arts Council will be presenting a collection of works dedicated solely to the exploration of photographic arts. Welcoming photographers of all levels, we want to see how you create compelling images reflecting all aspects of life. Whether it is abstract or representational, nature or urban, timeworn or new, personal or ordinary we want to see it!

ELIGIBILITY: All photographic processes in color and black and white. Please contact the Brookings Arts Council at 692-4177 with questions.

EXHIBITION DATES: January 3rd-26th, 2018

OPENING RECEPTION: Thursday, January 11, 2018, 4:30pm-6:30pm with awards presented at 5pm

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Friday, December 15, 2017

AWARDS: In each category BW and Color 1st: $75 2nd: $50 3rd: $25,

JUDGE: TBD

PICK UP WORK: Saturday and Tuesday, January 27 and 30, 12-5pm

ENTRY FEE Members: $20 per entry-limit of 2 works per artist.

EXHIBITION GUIDELINES • All work much be original and not previously exhibited at the Brookings Arts Council.

  • All 2D work must be ready to hang on a wire.
  • All 2D work must be framed or on gallery -wrapped canvas with finished edges.
  • Size of work: Minimum 8×10.
  • All work must be labeled on the back with title and artist’s name.

Deadline: 12-15-2017
Brookings Arts Council
524 4th St. Brookings SD 57006

Contact: Heather Kuhlman, Executive Director
email: directorbac@swiftel.net
Phone: 605.692.4177
Website: http://image8.photobiz.com/8521/20171101151906_243230.pdf

WEAVING A COMMUNITY THROUGH CREATIVE USE

Weaving is recognized as one of the oldest crafts, dating as far back as 6000 BC. Beginning as a product of necessity, weaving looms were used to create clothing, bedding, and other textiles of a protective nature. This applied art developed into a means of expression, tapestries woven for posterity, for pleasure, for interaction.

When I began weaving four years ago, I had no idea what I was doing. I had been intrigued by the craft, and was looking to experiment in a new medium. My journey began when we tore down the half pipe skate ramp in my backyard. Using a four foot scrap of weathered plywood and about 200 nails, I had built myself a machine! Yes, it was warped, full of splinters and even kind of smelly, but it was mine. The design of the loom has not overcomplicated itself, and I was intrigued to use a method that had been utilized throughout time, and all over the globe.

After creating a few weaves, I began to learn, to understand. I adapted my design, and with the help of my father, built a new, improved frame loom. Something with an adjustable stand, something… easy to transport. Through trial and error, I have developed several variations of a standing loom since then, with designs for myself, Hawthorne Elementary, and for JAM Art and Supplies.

Art Teacher Lisa Brunick with her loom at Hawthorne Elementary

Two years ago, we began bringing the JAM loom with us to our booth at summer festivals. We attended events throughout the Sioux Empire, such as: the 605 Summer Classic, Jazzfest, the Farmer’s Market, That Sounds Decent, as well as the Sidewalk Arts Festival. Bringing this loom provided us a way to interact with the crowd, an icebreaker as well as a means to sharing our Creative Reuse mission with young and old alike.

Weaving is a popular means of community building across the country. Using a shared loom is a means of creating your own image and story. The viewer is provided with an actualized representation of problem solving, threads and materials interacting in a self-sustained chaos. Our community weaves represent Sioux Falls, and each participant that helped create the piece.

Each weave that was created was made from donated material, and gave purpose to some otherwise overlooked materials. Our weaves contain everything from yarn, fabric scraps, fake flowers, men’s neckwear, to old sweaters and jewelry. To date, JAM has created 11 large-scale weaves in the past two years, all made from the helping hands of our community. There is pride in production, and we are just beaming.

Please, join JAM on November 9th at Remedy Brewing Company for an all-ages get-together and fundraiser. Drink fine local craft beer, listen to live music, learn how to weave, and take a chance or 5 or 10 at winning one of our beautiful, community-crafted weavings!

Raffle Tickets are $10 each or 3 for $20.

You can pre-purchase raffle tickets at JAM anytime before the event, but make sure you join us the night of because we’re giving away a JAM VIP Membership, and you must be present to win. JAM VIP Memberships are a $250 value that includes one complimentary in-house event, a tshirt, bumper sticker, and 25% off every purchase made in our store!

ART STUDENTS CREATE STEAMROLLER PRINTS

Though the wind may have been a minor nuisance, it was a beautiful, sunny day to create art outdoors on Thursday, October 12. For the first time ever, in a parking lot on the campus of Augustana, a dozen art students and 2 faculty collaborated with Myrl & Roy’s Paving in Sioux Falls to create large-scale prints using a steamroller.

Working in teams, students spent months prior preparing their 4-by-8-foot fiberboards, utilizing everything from traditional hand-carving tools to electric routers in order to create a relief. The surfaces were inked, covered with material, paper, carpet, a board, then pressed by the steamroller to create the print. The pressure of the steamroller was crucial for image transfer.

Part of the challenge was to find fabric large enough to print on.  While many students used bedsheets, some were able to find fabric large enough. One group used a piece of satin that printed very well. Another group decided to quilt together pieces of fabric so that the colors coordinated with parts of the image in order to create a color-blocked, screen printed feel. It turned out fantastic!

Photo courtesy of Senior Art Student Katie Munson

Students found that designs with more detail, though beautiful, tended to be more difficult to image than those with less intricate carvings.

Approximately 50 large-scale prints were created in five hours. Some of them are currently hanging in the atrium of the humanities building at Augie through the end of the semester. Be sure to check them out!

Photo courtesy of Senior Art Student Katie Munson

Faculty:

  • Chad Nelson
  • Lindsay Twa

Augustana Students:

  • Colter Benson
  • Breanna Burklund
  • Taisya  Gowlovech
  • Hannah  Grapevine
  • Nora Strom
  • Lotte Solvang
  • Ajla Sundstrom
  • Ella Ng
  • Wyatt Dickson
  • Katlin Munson

Iowa State Students:

  • Caleb Henkelman
  • Jordan Luckow

Arts council offers contributing businesses ‘seal of support’

via SiouxFalls.Business

The Sioux Falls Arts Council has started a merchant and corporate recognition program to give businesses a “seal of support” for contributing to the arts organization.

Businesses will receive the artist-designed seal to display on their websites and window fronts for a minimum $250 annual contribution.

The funds will support the arts council’s focus on arts coordination, cultivation and accessibility.

“The problem we had to solve was to create a stream of revenue that wouldn’t compete with the fundraising that programming-oriented arts organizations pursue,” executive director Kara Dirkson said. “They are the very organizations we want to see thrive.”

The seal was designed by Michael Hay. Businesses that make the donation also will be thanked on social media.

“These businesses and organizations think big about the arts,” Dirkson said. “They support the need for an organization that coordinates and cultivates the arts, so Sioux Falls can remain competitive in workforce development, tourism and overall quality of life.”

For information on obtaining a seal, click here.

Creative Soul Gathering

Creative people thrive off of each other. You are invited! You take your own supplies and materials and are doted on with amazing food, snacks, gorgeous views, and fellowship and crafting into the wee hours. See contact info below.

Volunteer Spotlight: Sara Bainter

The Volunteer Spotlight is a new series here on the JAM blog and I am a new blogger, so it’s a perfect match. You may be asking yourself what is the Volunteer Spotlight? Well, let me tell you. Each month we will pick one of the wonderful volunteers here at JAM and ask them many different questions about volunteering, their lives and any projects they’re excited about and want to share with us.

Ideally, I want to sit down face-to-face with my interviewee over a hot cup of tea, unfortunately for my first interview that wasn’t exactly how it went. Our busy schedules kept us apart, but email brought us together.  Say hello to the wonderful artist and poet, Sara Bainter, whom I have the pleasure of volunteering with at JAM.

Here it goes…

Shanda: How long have you been a volunteer at JAM? And why did you get involved?

Sara: I officially started volunteering January 2017? I started getting involved because I knew it would be a great place to volunteer and give back to a community that I felt like had already given so much to me artistically and otherwise since I moved here in March 2016.

What is the best part for you about volunteering at JAM?

The best part is getting to see all of the people who are shocked at the low price of their craft or art supplies, and are going home to create! I also love watching people’s reactions as they leave Exposure Gallery. It’s just a great feeling to experience it first hand.

What do you do at JAM?

I goof off or doodle a huge percentage of the time, and sometimes I put donations out like I’m supposed to. I like to help with Weird Art Wednesdays when I can. I love watching people of all ages come in and use art supplies for free for two hours while we work on creating projects together!

What would you tell someone who is thinking about volunteering at JAM?

You will be so appreciated and needed! Please help. (laughs out loud)

What is your art background?

I feel like that’s a very long story that maybe I should write. But it starts with me being very bored, isolated and lonely in Winner, South Dakota.

What project are you currently working on that you are really excited about?

Right now I’m in the middle of moving and turning my bedroom into an art installation to facilitate more dreaming and imagining.

You have a book coming out soon, tell us a little about that.

Campfire Poetry is the paraphrased journey of heartbreak, devastation and hope, which I illustrated with various mixed media. There is a guest illustration by Christopher Reistroffer! My intention is to give creative control of the lyrics to many different bands and see what comes out of those ideas and performances!

You have beautiful illustration in your book. What came first to you, the paintings or the words?

Thank you! The words definitely came first. It seems like suddenly poetry bled from every pore and I didn’t know when it would stop.

What emotions will be triggered while reading your book?

I’m hoping some people will feel empathy. Maybe others will feel like they are not the only ones with these experiences. I want hope to be a big part of the Campfire Poetry experience.

What was the most challenging part of writing this book? And what was the most rewarding part?

The challenging part of writing is in experiencing conflict worthy of inspiring others. I don’t think I have to talk specifically about what I went through, but I do have to talk about falling down and getting back up in the unique way that I did. I felt like I had no other choice than to write this book, and once it started coming together, I felt a deep responsibility to share it with others in hopes that it will help them.

How does it feel to finally have it done and in your hands?

I really only have had access to the only copy of the proof, and even though I had to change and fix a lot of things, it woke me up and I felt an even deeper responsibility to get the book into the hands of the right people.

Where and when can we buy your book?

The first copies of campfire poetry get here on November 6th. It will be available on Amazon.com. Just search Campfire Poetry or Sara Bainter… or stop me in the street and demand a copy because I will have some on me when they come out!

 

If you would like to volunteer at JAM our next hour-long training session will be Monday October 30th from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m. Must be 18 years old to volunteer alone, but under 18 can volunteer with a parent! You can find more info here.

for Sioux Falls Artists