EMILIE NETTINGA: AN INSPIRED INTERVIEW

Upon introductions, Emilie started in describing her recent artwork at her day job, Schmitt Music. The mural on the wall was installation-mounted to be sculpted to her designs of Sioux Falls, and the high school marching band community near the music shop’s location. 

“It’s definitely a learning experience. It’s new for me. I usually do clay sculpting. Actually, right now I am doing a series with beeswax, so it’s all different stuff. This is definitely something different – applying heat to it, and burning myself a lot.”

Did your boss ask you to create this?

“Yes he did. That’s what I went to school for, and I have degree in. This is my day job. They just built this new area for our repair man to have his own space to do instruments. This wall here was just big and plain. Actually, this is like my fourth attempt at doing this wall. I’ve painted it over and over and redone it, because that’s kind of an artist thing, but I never found what I wanted to do. I was like, I’m a sculptor and not really a painter, so lets do a wall that I can kind of make three dimensional. So, that’s what I’m going for.”

Describe to us what type of work you do, and your preferred mediums:

Sculpting of all different materials. I use to say I’m just a ceramics sculptor, I’m just a clay sculptor, but I’ve definitely branched out these past couple of years. Like I said earlier, the beeswax is super new for me…then styrofoam, and mostly three-dimensionals. 

Did you go to school for that? 

I went to school for fine art, but I had to study all the different mediums. To do that, you have to do painting, and printmaking and all that. 

Do you have more work at your house?

Yes, I have a series right now that I’m working on that is all about honey bees. I’m actually using real parts of beehives, and then beeswax to sculpt bees out of honeycombs and the wax.

All The Queen’s Drones, beeswax on true brood frame and hive box drawer.

How long have you been doing your specific medium? How has your work evolved over time?

I would actually say for sculpting it’s been since college. Probably about 9 years I’ve been doing all creative stuff, not just one certain thing. I’ve done all different crafts growing up…not just one specific thing. Oh man…overtime just the simple basic pottery wheel stuff, like cups and bowls, to putting it on the wall. 

Never done anything like this before, though. Did one sort of wall thing that was actually downtown. In the basement of JAM there was a thing called Art Maze, last year. They asked local artists to pretty much do whatever they wanted with the space. People walked through it like a maze. I did drywall mud on the walls, kind of like a mural to do something different, but never with styrofoam. 

Are there any factors that led you to where you are today?

I mean it’s kind of a cliche thing. I was doing something with my hands since I can really remember. Not necessarily coloring in coloring books, but kind of building and making things. It eventually led to the three-dimensional stuff. Just trying to do a painted mural like the one here took three different times, and kept getting painted over. I just couldn’t get it on the flat perspective, it didn’t look good to me. So, it evolved into this.

What usually inspires you to create your work?

Honestly, for this specific one right next to us, my experience from working here these last couple of years. I didn’t know a lot about the band scene and high school marching band until I worked here. Right down the street is the biggest Sioux Falls high school. In this area, and kind of in the country, they are really good. Their marching band performances are outstanding. Just hearing them in the summer, and their practices inspired me. So, this mural is going to be kind of a city with marching bands and stuff like that. 

The rest of my work, like the beeswax and everyday life things…it’s kind of advocating, because bees are super important. So, it’s about using the most natural things. All of it is the real thing. I’m using real beehives, and not using glue or paint. All the materials belong to bees. 

How long does it typically take you to complete a project?

This one took me a long time. Since like last December, so that doesn’t count. This one would be my longest one. I don’t have a specific set date on it, yet. But, I would say for me it takes longer than a lot people. For me it takes months to do sculptural things. I can’t do quick drawings or paintings. People can do stuff in like a day. Takes me quite longer to do stuff. It also, takes me longer because I have a 3-year-old, and I have my own business, and I work here. 

What is your other business?

I just started two months ago – art appraisal, and music instrument appraisal. So, I’m fitting it all in. It can definitely take months to do sculptural things. If its clay, it takes building, letting it dry, and firing it. I don’t get to commit to a lot of shows, because I don’t have a big compilation of works waiting around. But that’s ok, that’s just who I am. I have stuff made specifically for certain things. 

Emilie’s studio.

Have you sold any of your work?

I have sold smaller works. Downtown Sioux Falls does a great job with the downtown shows for local artists and stuff. The last couple of years I’ve done little clay pieces that were framed. I made like relief things, kind of like this with clay, and actually just fit them with regular picture frames. No glass or anything, and they were painted and everything. So, I’ve sold things like that.

Vivian Vintage, framed ceramic bas-relief-frame is also upholstered by hand.

Do you have anything you want to work on in the future? 

Yes I do. I feel like it’s kind of secretive, but I’ll give a clue. I definitely have a big idea specifically involving coffee, and like the downtown coffee scene. Using actual parts of coffee, the beans, and all that. 

Any skills you would like to develop over time that you haven’t yet?

I don’t know. I would definitely say, sculpting things I have never tried before. Metal working, actually…not sure if you guys noticed the sculpture walk. I would like to do a sculpture like that, but I haven’t done anything that huge, monumental or big. So, just learning how to work with bronze is a long-term goal of mine. 

Gilded Goldenrod, framed ceramic bas-relief.

How has Sioux Falls influenced your work? What are your thoughts on the art community in Sioux Falls?

I’m not native here. I’ve been here for like 5 years or so. So, just kind of taking it all in – a lot of the downtown vibe, the people that are down there. The art scene has been influential. I’ve even included the city logo, and the city itself with the old buildings in some of my works. 

I think it’s really growing. It’s kind of…I use the word vibrating, and you feel it when you are down there. It’s just growing a lot. People should check into it. 

What advice would you give to anyone starting out as an artist?

I would say, just be authentic, and just be who you are. Don’t try to fit in a certain bubble of art. What you are inspired to make, make it. Make it genuine, and for yourself. There will be people who will find you. 

FIND EMILIE:
Facebook: @emilieearmark
Instagram: @emilieearmark
Website: EarMark Evaluations

ADAM BEILKE: AN INSPIRED INTERVIEW

This college student, and Sioux Falls native, has art in his bones. Say “hey,” to Adam Beilke!

Describe to us what type of work you do, and what your preferred mediums are:

So, I’m kind of like mixed-media. I like making a lot of digital stuff, because I’m a Graphic Design student. I like doing that, but I also respect the art of traditional acrylic painting, so I do a lot of that, too. Just, like, all across the board.

Do you go to college then?

I’m a second year at Southeast Tech, and it’s only a 2 year degree.

How long have you been doing your specific medium? How has your work evolved over time?

Digital probably 3 years, and then painting I’ve been doing since high school.

I’m always looking at new artists and new styles, so I’m always getting inspired by different stuff…getting new ideas. I think I have a better understanding of what I want to make as time goes on.

Who are your favorite artists?

Off the top of my head, Keith Herring, the 80s artist. I like his simplicity. I like a lot of famous stuff like Picasso and Andy Warhol.

Some other favorite artists include Keith Haring, Alex Grey, Adam Jones, Craig Gleason, Sidney Howard, Nick Guenzler, Karnn Bhullar, Allie Craig and Merritt Cates.

There’s some cool local art, I just can’t think of any local artists off the top of my head.

Were there any factors that led you to where you are today?

I was just always interested in art in high school. Ever since I got out, I’ve been trying to book art exhibits and stuff. So, I’m always continuing it and practicing it.

Do you display your art anywhere?

In the process of making new pieces for my second art exhibit with my friend, Sam Babcock. He and I have known each other since middle school and he was the first person I reached out to about a collaborative show. He and I rented out gallery space at the Museum of Visual Materials this past spring. That was my first art show. We’re going to have another one in the summer. I plan to also work with some other local artists sometime in the near future.

What usually inspires you to create your work?

Usually other peoples stuff. It depends. I kind of have to be in the mood for it. If I have an idea, I have to act on it, and I never know when it’ll hit me. So, it kind of just varies.

How long does it typically take you to complete a project?

Usually, it can only be a couple hours if I’m just sitting down and working on it. But painting, it can be like hours on end. That stuff takes like a long time.

Do you have anything you want to work on in the future? 

I am currently trying to create and develop a clothing brand called “Viable Psyche.” This brand will serve as a way to tie in my passion for clothes-making, along with my design and art compositions. The name and logo represent growth and functionality between the mind, soul, or spirit, yet I encourage people to find their own meaning within its style. As of now, it doesn’t have an official website, but I do have a temporary artist shop using Threadless. I hope to be able to fund and launch a more independent website in the future as the brand (hopefully) grows. I’m selling shirts at Last Stop CD Shop, and also a record store downtown, as well.

Any skills you would like to develop over time that you have not yet done?

In the art world, maybe watercolor. I’m awful at watercolor, but my dad’s really good at it. I’ve never gotten to master that. I’m always retracing over my mistakes and stuff. I don’t know…I think there’s always a lot of stuff you can do with digital art. People are always creating new things and trying to figure out new technical stuff, and finding new techniques all the time.

So, you said your dad does watercolor painting. Does that inspire you?

Yeah, it’s weird because I’ve been drawing since I can remember. My mom’s also an art teacher at Lincoln High School. It just seemed right.

I find that my purest form of inspiration comes from listening to music. Artists tend to rely on looking at what other people are making, which can be a vital way to keep on top of trends and styles, but using music can be a great tool in coming up with my ideas. My CD and Spotify collection span across many genres, causing different emotions and thoughts to transfer upon listening. There’s nothing better than being able to tune out and start from scratch using only the creative influences of audio.

How has Sioux Falls influenced your work? 

I really like the culture here. I’ve been to a ton of exhibits at the Washington Pavilion. I think downtown has a cool creative scene. I think we all kind of inspire each other a bit.

What are your thoughts on the art community here?

Pretty cool. I like them. Like I said, I can’t name any local artists off the top of my head, but seeing stuff that’s around, it’s cool that we’re adapting to new styles and stuff.

What advice would you give to anyone starting out as an artist?

My advice would be not to try too hard. Being yourself is the most genuine thing you can do when it comes to being an artist. You don’t have to make a canvas. Draw whatever’s on the top of your head. Starting out with just a sketchbook, you can get as many ideas out as possible, then you can kind of pick and choose projects. Just starting out with a sketchpad and being original, drawing to have fun – those are the most important things I can recommend.

STORE: www.viablepsyche.threadless.com

INSTAGRAM: @viablepsyche

FACEBOOK: @viablepsyche

MOLLIE LAGE: AN INSPIRED INTERVIEW

“The Most effective way to do it, is to do it.”  – Amelia Earhart

With a heap to do the next handful of months – like finish graduate school, a graduate committee review, gallery exhibitions and shows, commissions, teaching a photo class for the first time, and full-time teaching at Washington High – Mollie Lage still carves out time to get in her studio, and hustle that art. We could not think of a better local artist to kick off the year (and revival) of our Inspired Interview Series. So, without further adieu…meet Mollie!

Describe to us what type of work you do, and your preferred mediums:

The art that I make when I’m not working on commissions is mostly abstract, and socially or emotionally motivated. I call it conceptual art because it’s based off of ideas rather than physical subject matter.

I also enjoy creating works that represent stories, which is why commissions are so important to me. It gives me the chance to bring someone else’s idea to life, and is a unique opportunity to give back. Acrylic and charcoal are my mediums of choice, but as a high school teacher, I’ve been dabbling in just about everything!

What’s the story about the people that you paint?

The show that I’m working on right now is called Visual Language. I teach at Washington High School where there’s a high ELL (English Language Learner) population. For instance, the parachute painting is called “Inadequate Safeties.” These students (some of them coming from refugee camps or war town countries) don’t always have the resources that they need to succeed, not necessarily academically, but in a lot of other ways, which is why I’ve been using my recent artwork to gain support for LSS Center for New Americans, an amazing source of help.

Old Enough”, the painting of a hand holding the balloons, is about the how in some countries birthdays aren’t celebrated, so when coming to America, the children have no idea how old they are. When some immigrants and refugees come into the United States, they have to give a date of birth, so they just put down January 1st of whatever year they think might be right. So, thinking about the mental ability of an average 9 year old versus an average 13 year old, that’s a disadvantage in itself. The balloons are for those students.

The portraits of the ladies are an attempt to represent idea formulation, and potential growth coming from people who don’t look the same as one another. Something that I’ve noticed as a teacher is that when a student doesn’t speak English very well, there can be a tendency to feel it’s necessary to water down the content they’re supposed to be learning. However, unless there has been major trauma or an event that has caused cognitive or educational delays (which is sometimes relevant), a 16-year-old who doesn’t speak English is just as aware and capable as an American born 16-year-old. Some adult refugees or immigrants were doctors in their country, but now have menial jobs or no jobs because of the language barrier, and the assumptions that employers make. I wanted to portray that thought, so I’m calling the series, “We are not weak.”

How long have you been doing your specific medium? How has your work evolved over time?

The first time I used acrylic, other than when I painted Christmas decor with my mom, was in high school, but it terrified me then because I was used to drawing. I got heavily into painting my sophomore year of college, and have been working with it since then, which was about 8 years ago.

Over years of teaching more realistic and technical skills that I wouldn’t necessarily say I had honed in on in high school and college, my work has turned from almost completely abstract (focusing mostly on color and texture) into something somewhere in the middle of abstract and realistic. I still love abstract painting, but I’m not afraid to get highly detailed in some areas of my work. I’ve begun to love making artwork that resonates and means something to other people, too, even ones that I don’t personally know. It’s so enriching to facilitate that connection.

Were there any factors that led you to where you are today?

First of all, my family has always been supportive in my artistic endeavors, so I don’t know where I’d be without them. At first that [endeavor] was music, but in high school I started developing a strong passion for drawing. When I went to the University of Sioux Falls, I went as an art education major with a music minor. Then, I dropped the education major, because the idea of teaching terrified me, and I added a psychology degree instead. Because of that switch, which I eventually switched back, I interviewed for an internship at Sanford in the arts and healthcare realm. I was offered the internship, which was a wonderful, heart wrenching, inspiring experience. Through it, I grew exponentially as an artist because of the emotional impact of working with children and adults who were battling, winning, or losing to cancer. Not only that, but the other artists that I worked with, and the unlimited number of supplies at my fingertips, funneled me into a making spree that hasn’t completely stopped since then. My husband, Chase, has also been a huge support, pushing me to make when I want to avoid it. We’ve been married for 6 months, and I’ve done more with my art than ever before.

Opportunities that fell into my lap, like traveling to Europe with my choir and art department in college, changed my life, my way of thinking about the world, and expanded my brain. Those thing I never expected or even wanted to experience, because I didn’t understand how immensely important they would be in my life. Traveling and teaching are an accurate representation of how my artist journey has been going so far – not knowing I needed something, and then having it plopped in my lap. I thank God for leading me here, allowing me to work my butt off doing what I love. I think it’s so important to say yes. even when you’re scared or don’t feel ready, because that’s how you’re forced to get ready, because that’s how I got here.

What usually inspires you to create your work?

It’s different every time. It can be something social or emotional that is triggering an urge to make. Sometimes it’s just a great way to think through a problem or an idea. Other times, a story has been shared with me, and I am trying to get it down for that person or that group of people. Other times it’s recreational, and fueled by the music that‘s playing.

How long does it typically take you to complete a project?

Until recently, I would go through spurts where I’d paint for 2 days straight, and then wouldn’t paint for weeks or months, but lately I’ve been trying to be more consistent. The amount of time a project takes really depends on the size and complexity of the project, but I am a pretty prolific painter when I get down to it.

Do you have anything you want to work on in the future? 

As far as artwork goes, I plan to continue doing a mix of commissions and originals. I plan to show Visual Language in 2019 and 2020 around Sioux Falls, calling more attention to the Center for New Americans. I plan to have WHS student work up alongside my own work at Dunn Bros in March. After that, The Museum of Visual Materials is hosting my work from September to October, and then I’ll be showing at the downtown Coffea from December to March of 2020. I’m working to fill up the year!

As that body of work is being shown, my plan is to continue with the fundraising project that I’ve been doing the last few months. I just created a website, MLSFStudio.com, which I’m using to host print sales of my own artwork. Each season I’ll be making mini prints of that artwork available. 50% of the proceeds from those mini print sales will be donated to the Center for New Americans.

Any skills you would like to develop over time?

Developing myself into a local business owner is something I’d like to do, but as far as making art goes, I’ll never stop working on my technical and design skills.

“Blown Away” Acrylic and Charcoal on Birch Board, 2018

How has Sioux Falls influenced your work? 

Sioux Falls has been a lovely supporter of the arts since I first moved here, and it’s only getting better. My students here, and the people I interact with at work and in my personal life, are frequently leaving me feeling motivated to make. Obviously, my teaching career at Washington in Sioux Falls has been a huge influence in my latest body of work.

“The Will” 30×30 Mixed Media

What are your thoughts on the art community in Sioux Falls?

The art community here is smaller just because Sioux Falls is smaller, but we are definitely blossoming, and seeing more and more people reaching out to get the arts involved in their projects. We have the Sculpture Walk, the Pavilion with Arts Night and the fine arts center, First Fridays, and more galleries and places willing and ready to host artwork. We’re definitely growing, and with that growth, more opportunities to be successful as an artist here. Lastly, most Sioux Falls people see the value in supporting local artists, businesses, and food producers, which has created an encouraging environment for us to do what we do.

Mollie with her cat, Chip.

What advice would you give to anyone starting out as an artist?

Just keep making, and don’t be afraid to put yourself out there. Hone your skill and be diligent. Don’t take criticism harshly even if it’s harsh, just consider it. Look at what you make, and either toss the criticism to the side, or take it as kind advice and use it to get better. Even if you don’t always feel confident about what you’ve made, which you won’t, put yourself out there to other people anyway, because as a collective of human beings with lots of opinions, skills, thoughts, and ideas, the people around you are your greatest resource.

__________________________

Find Mollie’s work!

FACEBOOK: MLSF Studio

INSTAGRAM: @mlsf.studio

WEBSITE/SHOP: www.mlsfstudio.com

P.S. Check out our Art Educator Interview with Mollie from back in 2015!

39th Annual Artists of the Plains

Date: February 15 – February 17, 2019

Times: Friday: 5-9 p.m.; Saturday: 10 a.m.- 6 p.m.; Sunday: 10 a.m.- 3 p.m.

Location: Hilton Garden Inn, 201 E. 8th Street, in downtown Sioux Falls

Ticket Info: Free and open to the public.


Now in its 39th year, the Artists of the Plains Art Show and Sale, sponsored by the Center for Western Studies at Augustana University, is a staple for art lovers from all over the region. The show will once again be held at the beautiful Hilton Garden Inn, 201 E. 8th Street, Downtown Sioux Falls. The event is free and open to the public and Art Show attendees will enjoy free underground parking.

The artwork of more than 30 artists from across the region, including Augustana University students, will be on display and for sale. This one of a kind show provides a wonderful opportunity for the public to meet one-on-one with area artists and discuss their work, including both popular, well-established artists and remarkable up-and-coming artists you’ll be hearing about for years to come.

Artists invited to the 2019 show work in many different media — oil, acrylic, watercolor, 2-D/3-D mixed media, sculpture, jewelry, pottery, and photography — and works will be available for sale at a variety of price points. There is something for everyone at the Artists of the Plains Art Show and Sale.


Hours are:

  • Friday, Feb. 15: 5-9 p.m. (premier showing and reception; awards ceremony will begin at 8 p.m.)
  • Saturday, Feb. 16: 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
  • Sunday, Feb 17: 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.

The Center for Western Studies offers cash awards in the following categories: Two-Dimensional Best of Show ($200 first place and $100 second place) and Three-Dimensional Best of Show ($200 first place and $100 second place).


Artists who have been invited:

In addition to these artists, a number of Augustana University art students will be exhibiting and selling their work.

As a signature program of the Center for Western Studies, this show and sale is designed to educate the public about the cultural importance and variety of regional art and artists. The largest and longest running show if its kind in the region, Artists of the Plains is an annual highlight of the Center’s Art Program and Educational Exhibits, one of several programming areas supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The event is a gift to the artists and collectors of the Northern Plains.

For further information, please contact Education Assistant Kristi Thomas at 605.274.4005.

Mayor TenHaken unveils City Hall art exhibits

Mayor Paul TenHaken and the Sioux Falls Arts Council introduced the first pieces of a rotating art exhibit on Friday.

The pieces will rotate every few months and will display works from artists across the region.

The mayor said the hope is to showcase the talented artisans who contribute so much to the community.

Artist Rodger Ellingson, whose painting called “The Band” was selected for the exhibit, said it was inspired by his son’s time in the Lincoln High School band.

“It’s one of my favorites, just because of the band connection, the State connection and just, I like it,” he said.

Artists interested in showcasing their art should contact the Sioux Falls Arts Council.

via KSFY. To view the video, click here.

Rehfeld’s and Alzheimer’s Association Partnering to Find Cure

Every 65 seconds someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s. Right now there is no cure for the disease, but that’s not stopping an area business from stepping up to help find a cure.

The 3rd Annual Art Benefit for Alzheimer’s kicked off Friday. Rehfeld Art and Framing is teaming up with the Alzheimer’s Association for the event.

Sioux Falls Artist Idali Hall’s painting is up for raffle, and all proceeds benefit the association.

Rehfeld’s owner Matt Jorgenson’s grandmother died from Alzheimer’s and his father currently has it, so he says he’s passionate about helping the organization.

“We’re starting to see a really good positive response to it. It’s a great way to raise awareness for the cause as well as get a great piece of art work into someone’s hands,” says Jorgenson.

Alzheimer’s is the 6th leading cause of death in the U.S. The disease robs a person of their memory and personality and eventually leads to death.

The Alzheimer’s Association of South Dakota wants people to know they are here to help.

“It’s important for families to know…

via KDLT. To view more, click here.

The Power Of Music: How It Boosts Creativity And Inspires Your Art

by Lucy Chambers
JAM Contributing Writer

Many of us intuitively know the power music has to get our creative juices flowing and inspire art, but there’s also research to back it up. In one recent study, participants tried various creative exercises all measuring divergent thinking — the ability to come up with creative or innovative ideas. Participants who listened to happy music did significantly better than those who performed in silence. These results suggest listening to happy music can boost creativity and open you up to new ways of approaching your art. But let’s take a deeper look at how music listening promotes creative thinking by stimulating higher brain function and altering mood.

Music boosts higher brain functioning

It’s not just happy music which has a positive effect on the brain and creative abilities. When people listen to their preferred genre — whether it’s classical, rock, pop or jazz — they perform better on cognitive tests. For example, in one study, participants who listened to Franz Schubert achieved higher results than participants who sat in silence. The experiment was then performed again, but with participants listening to a Stephen King audiobook. The listening preferences of the individual were found to matter most. “The people who liked Mozart better do better after Mozart, and the people who liked the story better do better on the cognitive test after the story”, Glenn Schellenberg, psychology professor at the University of Toronto and leader of the study, explains.

The link between creativity and positivity

While it’s difficult to measure the extent to which listening to music boosts creativity, it’s been proven to inspire higher brain functioning — which is necessary to reach your full creative potential. All that matters is you like the music you’re listening to. If the music puts you in a positive mood, your art and creativity may benefit as a result. This is likely because happiness is a positive emotion which opens up the mind and awakens our desire to explore, create, and play, explains researcher Barbara Fredrickson.

Music and creative brain waves

Further research has shown the power music has on brain waves, which helps make sense of its ability to inspire creativity and art. When you’re awake, your brain produces beta waves between 14 and 20 hertz. Beta waves are stimulating; they improve focus, logical thinking, memory, and problem solving. When you’re in a creative flow, your brain heightens to alpha waves between 4 and 7 hertz. Your brain also produces alpha waves between 8 and 13 hertz when you listen to music with a pulse of 60 beats per minute. So, listening to relaxing music — like classical music, for example — can help you become more creative and inspired.

Ultimately, if music can put you in a positive frame of mind, it may benefit you cognitively and creatively. However, that’s not to downplay the potential benefits of listening to sad music either. Sad music elicits feelings of empathy, which can expose you to creative insights you wouldn’t otherwise get. So, the next time you have an art session, put on some music and unlock your full creative potential.

Lucy Chambers is a professional freelance writer with many years experience across a variety of sectors. She made the move to freelancing from a stressful corporate job, and loves the work-life balance it offers her.

CFA: JAM January Show

Call for NEW ART  

JAM Gallery January show | From Auld to New

Requirements: Art needs to have been created within the last 6 months, and not yet shown. Multiple pieces welcome. A photo of your face also needed.

Pieces due to JAM by the 17th. Show goes up on the 18th. Reception is on the 19th. Art hangs through the end of the month.

Direct message Sam Lopez or JAM with title/price (and photo of your face for promo). Questions, contact Sam at 605-254-5211.

MEET THE CREATIVE: DEREK “FOCUS” SMITH

Graffiti artist and About The Life, Inc. Co-Founder, Derek “Focus” Smith, has combined his culture and his love of art to make a difference where it matters. One of his most recent works is a 20-foot-by-20-foot mural in Art Alley in honor of the children who were recently discovered in unmarked graves near the Sioux San Hospital land (formerly the Rapid City Indian Boarding School). Focus also has had works in the Dahl Arts Center, at different events, and in Pine Ridge, among other places. 605 chatted with the artist to see more of what’s behind the spray can.

SOME PEOPLE MAY KNOW MY WORK FROM……murals I’ve painted in Pine Ridge while working with local students to promote their cultural awareness, as well as from “WhereThe Wild Things Are,” South Dakota’s first ever graffiti exhibit [at the Dahl].

I WAS DRAWN TO MURALS WHEN…I would see the graffiti murals in bigger cities. Figuring out how I could do that became magnetic, a gravitational force…

via 605 Magazine. To view more, click here.

Arc of Dreams hits the road

Sioux Falls newest piece of art hit the road Tuesday morning.

Sections of the Arc of Dreams were loaded onto six semis in Denver early Tuesday morning. The sculpture was assembled and polished at site in the mile high city.

Crews will make the seven-hour drive to Sturgis, where artist Dale Lamphere has a studio. Lamphere will put the final touches on the sculpture over the winter.

The Arc of Dreams will be installed over the Big Sioux River in downtown Sioux Falls in the spring of 2019.

This one-of-a-kind sculpture has been in the works for five years, from the design process to fundraising and construction. At the center of the Arc of Dreams is a 18-foot gap, 70 feet above the river, representing the leap of faith dreamers take to see their dreams come true.

via KSFY. To view more, click here.

for Sioux Falls Artists