All posts by Tana Zwart

Artist Brings Washington Pavilion Staircase to Life

The Washington Pavilion is known for its lively shows, movies and exhibits.

Now it’s added the talents of a man who is bringing more life to the Pavilion through his art work.

“I’ve always drawn. I’ve just never stopped,” says Chuck Bennis of Brookings.

Bennis can now add this mural to his resume. It depicts space, Falls Park and South Dakota while wrapping around a stairwell at the Washington Pavilion.

“What I wanted to do with this space is to make an ordinary stairwell, and make it something special,” says Bennis.

Bennis free handed the entire piece with markers. He’ll be satisfied if he can inspire just one person to start drawing.

“I hope my style connects with this space too. It’s something bold something fun,” says Bennis.

Those with the Pavilion knew the stairs were the right place to bring this masterpiece.

“Everybody is just kind of walking up and going up and down them. It was one of those great locations where we thought we could really utilize this,” says Washington Pavilion Director Jason Folkerts…

via KDLT. To view more, click here.

Sioux Falls Design Center celebrates variety of design disciplines

The Sioux Falls Design Center is hosting a week-long event to celebrate the various types of design like architecture, landscape, and graphic design. There are several events planned throughout the week at different locations in Downtown Sioux Falls.

Sioux Falls Design Week – Sustainable Neighborhood Summit

It started on Friday, September 28th but doesn’t end until Friday, October 5th. The various activities include workshops, panel discussions, talks, demonstrations, and a pop-up shop of local designers. All of the events are free to attend.

On Monday, there is a hands-on workshop that explores the design thinking process and how you can solve problems through the lens of the end user. It’s from 4:00 PM until 6:00 PM…

via KSFY. To view more, click here.

HANG OUT WITH ELI SHOW

Sioux Falls Heritage Museums preparator Eli Show gets to work directly with all of the objects patrons see daily at the Old Courthouse Museum. Show is currently coordinating the next big exhibit, “Toys,” which opens November 29 from 5-8 p.m. and will be full of nostalgic toys from the 1920s through the 90s and 2000s.

Also a well known artist himself and one of the masterminds behind local band We All Have Hooks for Hands, 605 got to get a look at what a typical day in his life looks like.

I really enjoy stopping at Queen City Bakery before work or when I’m out running errands. I’m obsessed with their doughnut muffins. I’m currently working on my dad-bod, so I need baked goods.

I usually buy most of my clothes online, but if I’m looking for a good pair of “mom jeans” to lounge around in, I’ll hit up a few thrift stores. My OG faves are St. Vincent de Paul or Union Gospel Mission Thrift

via 605 Magazine. To view more, click here.

Youngers Studio Tuesday Night Drawing Group Resumes

Tuesday Night Drawing Group resumes this week!
Tues, Oct 2nd– Nude figure pose, Ann will be our model
6:30-9:00pm
$12
Send a reply or call/text if you plan to attend 🙂

Looking forward to seeing you all again!
 
—————————————
– OCTOBER SCHEDULE –
10/2 – Nude Figure (Ann)
10/9 – Portrait/Costume
10/16 – Nude Figure (Marcus)
10/23 – Nude Figure (Monica)
10/30 – Nude Figure (Monica)
ANNA YOUNGERS FINE ART
335 N. Main Ave. Ste. 210
Sioux Falls, SD 57104
605.929.5016
www.annayoungers.com
anna@annayoungers.com

FULL CIRCLE BOOK CO-OP TO OPEN SHOP NOVEMBER 2

After a diligent year and a half, Sion Lidster and Jason Kurtz of Full Circle Book Co-op will open their official brick-and-mortar location in Sioux Falls. A creative space for local artists of all ages and trades, FCBC is sure to be a springboard for countless local projects and ideas. We are so excited for our brothers in grassroots art advocacy. Congratulations and welcome to downtown!   – Tana

Tana: Tell us a little about the Full Circle Book Co-op. What is it? How did the idea come about?

Sion Lidster: In its most basic form, the FCBC is a creative hub – based around a used books shop, events space and beer/wine/coffee/conversation bar – that serves affordable food!

The idea is to create a place where artists and fans of the arts can come to hang out, talk, work and meet each other. I hope that it will help inspire artistic projects and ideas.

A physical space is important in artistic movements, and I believe that service to the arts goes far beyond the artists themselves. It becomes the duty of businesses to afford artists their lifestyle, if they do indeed support that community. This means low prices and open arms. It means a meal that won’t break the bank, a full coffee cup, a round of beer and merriment. We want to feed the arts, literally!

The idea came about in order to solve a problem we were facing. Me and my friend and business partner, Jason Kurtz, both run literary non-profits, and we were struggling to find all age venues to host our events that didn’t cost more than we could afford. We decided to work together to create a space that would not only provide this, but would hopefully become an inspiring home for all artists looking for one. The co-op idea came about because we want to encourage community, but want to make it clear that you do not have to be a member to shop with us – our membership program provides additional benefits.

After a year and a half of pop-up shops and events around the community, you guys have secured a physical location. Was that always the goal? What has been the process? Where will it be located?

It was always the goal to have a physical location. In fact, we were quick to announce that the space was coming last summer before we hit some road bumps (we are artists and optimists first)! Those road bumps taught us some valuable lessons that we are now bringing to our new location. Funnily enough, the location we have now was actually the first place we ever wanted to lease – so, full circle it is!

We will be located at 123 W 10thSt, Downtown Sioux Falls (the former Hydra building).

What’s your vision for the space?

You will walk through the door to an eye full of books and histories. You will walk on and find someone writing in a notebook. There may be a passionate conversation at the bar. There’ll be poetry on the walls. There will be an artist selling their wares in a booth. A non-profit will be holding a meeting in our scriptorium. You’ll look at a menu of delicious, shareable meals. Depending on the day, you may be treated to open mic poetry, live jazz, stand-up comedy, independent theatre, figure drawing, or a zine-making workshop.

A place where you are going to come and find a surprise – whether that is a book that you never knew you wanted, a painting you’ve never seen, or a person you’ve never met. A community meeting point, open and welcoming to all.

You launched a Kickstarter to raise funds toward initial expenses. Can you give us some of those details?

Yes, we have a Kickstarter running until Thursday, October 18th. We are asking for $10,000 dollars to cover initial start-up costs, such as inventory, kitchen equipment, building improvements/maintenance, licenses, and the Kickstarter costs themselves.

We are offering a number of rewards for your donations, from gift certificates to swag bags to lifetime memberships, and more! More info here.

For those who might not be able to help monetarily, what are some other ways they can offer support?

Being a grassroots effort, there are many ways to support us that does not require your money. Sharing our posts. Inviting people to our events on social media. Interviewing us. Holding events with us. Word of mouth. Handing out fliers. Volunteering. Donating books.

Currently, $100 (100 points), a donation of 100 books (100 points), or volunteering 20 hours (5 points an hour), or a combination, will get you a year’s rolling membership. These are real physical ways to keep the doors open.

You are for the community by the community. What are some ways the community can get involved once your space is up and running?

Absolutely.

The easiest way to get involved is to just simply ‘turn up.’ Come and buy our books, drink our coffee, join us for happy hour. Come and eat with us, break bread, share your news. Be a part of what this could be. The dream is to make this a living space, something memorable. We cannot, and don’t want to, do it without you.

If you want to hold an event, get in touch with us. If you have a non-profit and need a meeting space, get in touch with us. Consider us for your birthday parties, holiday parties, fundraising parties…
Come and perform with us, share your poetry, your acting, your painting. Bring us your books and prints to sell on the shelves…
Come to our classes, become members, bring a friend…
Create with us…

When will you officially open?

The official opening date is Friday, November 2nd. There will be a weekend full of festivities!

What kind of events will you host?

Open mic poetry, independent theatre, writing courses, TED-X style presentations, game nights, pub quiz, figure drawing, independent cinema, first page reads, writing critiques, cultural celebrations, salon-style conversations, live comedy, live podcasting, book clubs and book explorations, artistic happy hours, acting classes, photography classes, journaling classes, jazz brunch… and more!
We have many lists!

Even though you are a book co-op, like you said you are a creative space, and will have opportunities for a ray of artists. What kind of opportunities will you have available to visual artists?

When I speak of artists I speak of all mediums –  written, visual, and beyond.

We want a space that is dedicated to a featured monthly visual artist. Somewhere where, instead of merely hosting work as a backdrop to our shop, we are working with the artist as part of an idea, an installation, for them to get the best of their work.

We are also going to have a space to sell prints, as well as a booth that can be hired at any time during our opening hours for people to sell their work (not specific to visual, but totally included.)

How can they reach out to you to get involved?

The easiest and quickest way is by liking and messaging us on Facebook, where Jason will get back to you quickly.

What is the best way to keep in the know? Newsletter sign-up, Facebook?

Join up to our newsletter (fullcirclebookcoop.com)
Like us on Facebook/Instagram (@fullcirclebookcoop)
Donate to Kickstarter

How do you see things a year from now?

Looking back on one hell of an experiment, hopefully with a full house of poets and artists to celebrate with us!

Any other pertinent details I might be missing? 

I think this covered the wider, more in-depth bases really well. Got to cover ground that our ‘elevator pitch’ doesn’t scratch, so thank you very much for the questions!!!

Make sure to mark your calendars for November 2!

 

Dickson Receives Harold Spitznagel Medal for Achievement in Art

Augustana senior Wyatt Dickson (Sioux Falls) has been awarded the prestigious Harold Spitznagel Medal for Achievement in Art, the highest award presented by the Augustana art department to student-artists who demonstrate the highest standards of excellence in all their artistic endeavors throughout their Augustana careers.

The award, which was presented on Friday, April 27, during the opening reception for the 2018 Senior Art Show in the Eide/Dalrymple Gallery, is only bestowed occasionally and was last given to a graduating senior art major in 2014.

Dickson transferred to Augustana University in 2016.

Art department faculty said from the moment Dickson arrived, he became integral to the fabric of the department has been a model and mentor for other students.

“One of Wyatt’s outstanding qualities is his compassion,” said Painting Professor Tom Shields. “He has, on numerous occasions, volunteered to help other students and faculty in various capacities.”…

via Augie.edu. View more here.

How to make art into a business? Sioux Falls nonprofit has answers

The first time Claudia Dail hosted a business class for artists, she could see there was a need for her kind of expertise.

Artists are great at what they do, but in the era of entrepreneur there is plenty of opportunity for creative minds to transform their ideas into a viable business.

That means learning skills in the world of finance and marketing.

“It was very well attended, it was very well received,” Dail said. “I could see these artists were sponges for business information.”

That was in 2014.

Dail has continued to find widespread interest in her business classes among the local artist community in Sioux Falls and recently announced a slate of fall workshops starting in October.

Her educational service, The Watering Can, is offering a day-long class Oct. 20 calls “Nuts and Bolts,” dividing the day up into four sections covering legal considerations, setting up a business in South Dakota, accounting techniques and pricing work…

via the Argus. To view more, click here.

Nominations open for 24th biennial Governor’s Awards in the Arts

For more information, contact: 
Shari Kosel, Program & Communications Director 
shari@ArtsSouthDakota.org 

Nominations open for 24th biennial Governor’s Awards in the Arts 

Arts South Dakota and the South Dakota Arts Council co-sponsor the biennial Governor’s Awards in the Arts to recognize individuals and businesses that have made a statewide impact through artistic excellence or outstanding support of the arts. 

Nominations are open through November 15. More information about the awards and nomination forms are available at ArtsSouthDakota.org. The classifications for these awards are: 

  • Distinction in Creative Achievement: Nominees in this lifetime achievement category should be individual artists who have made significant contributions in any of the various arts disciplines. 
  • Outstanding Service in Arts Education: Nominees in this lifetime achievement category should be individuals who have made significant contributions to arts education as a teacher, mentor or catalyst. 
  • Outstanding Support of the Arts by an Individual: Nominees in this lifetime achievement category should be individuals who have made outstanding contributions in supporting and encouraging the arts with their time, talent or funding. 
  • Outstanding Support of the Arts by an Organization or Business: Nominees in this lifetime achievement category should be an organization, business or corporation that has demonstrated leadership in supporting and encouraging the arts through time, talent and funding, or by funding and presenting projects by South Dakota artists for public education and enjoyment. 
  • Outstanding Support of the Arts to Native Nations with Lands in South Dakota: This award will be given to an individual, organization or business from South Dakota that has made significant contributions through the arts to Native nations with lands in South Dakota. The recipient will have demonstrated strong arts traditions and revitalization in Native communities by promoting social justice and cultural understanding.

The Governor’s Awards in the Arts will be presented at the Ramkota Hotel & Conference Center in Pierre on February 12, 2019. Recipients must be present to accept the award. Nominations may be made by an organization, institution or individual and must be postmarked no later than November 15, 2018. Employees and board members of Arts South Dakota and the South Dakota Arts Council are not eligible for these awards. 

Materials to be submitted include one copy of the nomination form and a brief personal history of the nominee and summary of accomplishments of the nominee, no more than three pages in length. Samples or representations of artists work are encouraged and must be submitted in triplicate. Up to five letters of support may be submitted. All materials should be mailed to: Arts South Dakota, PO Box 2496, Sioux Falls, SD 57101 Phone: (605) 252-5979 or may be uploaded via ArtsSouthDakota.org. 

Someone You Should Know: Artist Shaine Schroeder

Art has always been a part of Shaine Schroeder’s life. As a little boy he picked up drawing.

He’s more recently taken his work to a larger space.

“You could sit down for an hour and a half and draw on an 8 by 10 piece of paper and it can look fine but it’s a totally different story when you’re putting it onto a 30 foot wall,” he said.

His work graces the back patio of M.B. Haskett.

It also hangs on the walls of another restaurant, Bro’s Brasserie Americano.

His most recent piece, the mural behind Pave’s newest upstairs bar, came with a new challenge.

“I had to paint on the ceiling. Behind the bar is this kind of curved quarter circle that basically transitions on to the ceiling and I never painted on anything like that.”

One of his most well known pieces is also one of his favorites.

“The piece’s name is Confetti,” he said, standing outside of the mural painted on the side of Common Sense.

“I had a blast doing it. I think the colors speak to everything I’ve ever wanted to express.”

Bright colors are a staple in his work.

“I love Sioux falls, it’s just, hard for anyone in this city to have six months of gray skies so that’s kind of the message that I’m trying to get across is like, ‘Hey it’s not that bad, take a look at this.”…

via KDLT. To view more, click here.

23-year-old opens first Native-owned museum in Rapid City

After a year, Lakota Dream Museum has come to past

” About a year and a half ago, I was sitting in my college dorm room and I always thought you know we have one of the greatest cultures throughout American history and world history but we don’t have a place we can call home,” said Adonis Saltes, president of Lakota Dream.

The 23-year-old walked us through what is known to be the first Native owned and operated museum in Rapid City.

“This is my favorite exhibition in the museum. What we are looking at right now is one of the four white buffalo calves ever known to this century to be born” he said.

From the top to the bottom, Lakota Dream is home to a handful of sacred relics and the Native regalia that we may think we know so well.

“We wanted to paint the face black and red because if you look back in the history, one of our great chiefs rain the face, that’s the way he use to paint his face,” Saltes continued.

At the museum, you do not just see it, you experience the culture through the tales of the people…

via KEVN. To view more, click here.